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American After 1900 First time owner questions ST #2 Regulator

ChimeTime

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May 4, 2021
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Very excited to acquire my first #2 ST Regulator in excellent shape today at a small town clock shop. Only 2 hours into ownership and I already have some basic questions...
  • The shop owner was convinced this is a clock from the 1920's based on the shape of the woodwork on the lower end, and Roman numeral dial. But the clock is blonde oak and doesn't show 100 years of wear. There are no paper labels, but the case is stamped "24" near the lower door hinge. I'm fairly certain it's one of the Talley re-issues (which is fine with me). Who is right ?
  • We dismounted the weight for transport and he showed me how to use rubber bands to hold the pulley in place, but then he said the pendulum did not dis-mount on the #2. That seems very strange for a clock with such a long pendulum. All the on-line spare parts seem to have a standard looking pendulum hook, but I can't see far enough up inside to tell about this one. Should it dis-connect ?
  • The brass pendulum bob measures about 3.8" in diameter, that seems to be large based on the on-line description of spares. He told me some parts were missing when they purchased it at a country antique auction. The clock runs great. I don't intend to change anything just yet, but did later clocks come with larger bobs ?
According to my phone app, the clock is spot-on and I'm already loving this thing. :emoji_relaxed:
Thanks in advance for any replies.

st2.jpg st1.jpg
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Well, the ones I see usually have two screws through the dial face. All have a pemdulum hook but for a short haul, I usually tape and go. Others will know much more about what you have there. Willie X
 
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bruce linde

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The ones with two screws through the dial typically have number 77 movements and I would support peace behind the dial. We need to at least see the inside bottom of the case and any label that might be there, but the only way to really identify what you have is to pull the hands, remove the dial and take a look at the movement… And even then these were one of the most counterfeited clocks ever.

First impressions though or that it looks nice and congratulations.
 

bruce linde

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And, that case bottom goes back to when they were originally made starting in the 1860s, and of course the pendulums are removable, and I just noticed the part about there was no label. Typically the 70s re-issues had a label in the bottom that said number whatever of 4000
 

brian fisher

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it looks awfully clean for its "age" as you say. just from the photos, i would perhaps assume its a repro. are you comfortable taking the dial off and shooting some pix of what is under there?
 

bruce linde

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It’s really simple to pull the dial… Remove the tapered pan holding the minute hand in place, pull out the second hand with a thumb and forefinger, and twist and pull the hour hand off. Remove the screws holding the dial in place and you (we!) can see what’s under the hood. Seth Thomas dials were notorious for the paint flaking off… This is either a repro clock or a repainted/replacement dial.

either way, classic design, lovely clock…. it was one of those that infected w the clock bug. :)
 

new2clocks

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Apr 25, 2005
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In the mid-1970s, the Seth Thomas Company authorized these (and other) of their earlier models to be manufactured.

If your clock is, in fact, a mid-1970s Seth Thomas #2, then your clock is a legitimate Seth Thomas clock of 1970s vintage.

The term "reproduction" in the clock world entails negative connotations. The Seth Thomas clocks of the mid-1970s are authorized reissues of their earlier models and are as legitimate as the same model Seth Thomas made in 1900.

A picture of the movement can confirm whether your clock is an authorized reissue.

The Seth Thomas reissues, BTW, are collectible.

Regards.
 

ChimeTime

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Thanks for the replies. I have also come to the same conclusion that the movement needs a good look. Unfortunately, I already have 3 clocks apart that require repair. Therefore, it's hard to disassemble (even temporarily) a clock that is accurate enough to keep up with quartz movements !! :emoji_yum:

But we'll get there.
 

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