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February Watch of the Month

John Cote

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The February 2006 interstatetime.com Watch of the Month is probably more like the Watch of the Year. I have been collecting for several decades and I have rarely seen a watch of this quality and importance. You can read about it in detail at the link below, but I will start here by saying that it is a 20 size Key Wind Waltham/Nashua American Grade watch. On top of that, it is a Presidential presentation by Abraham Lincoln.

If that is enough to make you want to take a look, click the link below:

CLICK HERE:

Please take a minute to thank NAWCC Chapter 149 member Peter Stammler for letting me use his watch as Watch of the Month and for taking the very nice photos.
 

John Cote

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The February 2006 interstatetime.com Watch of the Month is probably more like the Watch of the Year. I have been collecting for several decades and I have rarely seen a watch of this quality and importance. You can read about it in detail at the link below, but I will start here by saying that it is a 20 size Key Wind Waltham/Nashua American Grade watch. On top of that, it is a Presidential presentation by Abraham Lincoln.

If that is enough to make you want to take a look, click the link below:

CLICK HERE:

Please take a minute to thank NAWCC Chapter 149 member Peter Stammler for letting me use his watch as Watch of the Month and for taking the very nice photos.
 

Kent

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Yes, thanks John!
 

John Cote

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Thank you Jeff and Kent, but don't thank me. I just built the little presentation. Thank Peter. It is his watch and he took the photos.
 

Jerry Treiman

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Thanks to John, and Pete, too!
 

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That is quite a find and a keeper, to say the least! It is certainly a museum piece.


(I am glad the chop shops didn't find it first! :biggrin: )
 

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Thanks Peter, for sharing it and thanks John for putting it on-line. It is really a great example.

As you all may know, this is a really special example. I recall seeing one other without a vibrating HS stud, but this is the only Nashua production example I know of.

Here is a link to the more standard example from a couple of years later. It looks like I need to change my description of this watch to correct the starting date.
 

John Cote

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Thanks to Tom And Jerry (what a pair) for putting up the links to other references on these KW-20 Presidential Presentation watches.

It is interesting that the other watches have different degrees of enameling in the engravings on both sides of the cases. Peter's watch shows no signs of ever having been enameled. The case is in such good shape that the thought of the enamel having worn or been scraped off just doesn't work for me. Maybe this early example just never had it done?
 

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Thanks everybody for showing appreciation to this fine piece. As John writes there are absolutely no traces of any enameling on this one as opposed to others I have seen pics of. The engraving's crevices simply are not deep enough for any filling. Wonder if there could be any documentation on what event gave reason for presenting such a watch? I have found out something about the steamer Mississippi and thats fascinating reading to say the least, but I have not been able to learn anything about the man whom it was given to, Capt B.A. Oberg. I have reason to believe he was a Swede, though.

I am very proud of this watch, which has so many interesting and unique features: First of all a Nashua watch;
then a Presidential presentation watch, and an early one, too! One of the very first maybe? Given for some (good?)reason during the Civil War;
And of course an early 20s Waltham with the interesting Stratton's barrel, all beatifully executed.
Lastly it has a HEAVY 18" golden chain attached, wonder if it was there from the beginning? It has an older swedish golden winding key attached, but the connecting ring has a Swedish hall mark for 1862.
 

Tom McIntyre

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Peter, I think your example could very well be the first one. It would be wonderful to uncover the original accounts of the rescue and the parties involved.

The rules for these watches were that they were to be awarded to captains of foreign vessels for the rescue of American sailors at sea. The geat bulk of these awards were after Lincoln's death.

You might notice that the watch I posted and the one Jerry posted from the 2002 Seminar Exhibit are both in the same run at 150,001. There are 90 watches in that run that were made between 1865 and 1868, and I would guess that they were all Presidential Award watches. Since they were awarded to foreign captains, they would be scattered all over the world.

There are other later watches by Waltham and other companies with similar citations, but none have the impact of the 20 size American Grade vibrators or Peter's wonderful Nashua production example.
 

John Cote

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I decided to do a little searching on my own about BA Oberg and the Steamship Mississippi. Like Peter, I could not find anything about Capt Oberg, but the Mississippi is easy to find because it was a very important ship. It was one of the first Steamships built for the American Navy and her first commander was famous Commodore Matthew C. Perry.

What follows is a partial quote from: Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, Department of the Navy, Naval Historical Center, Washington Navy Yard, Washington, DC.

"The first Mississippi, a side-wheel steamer, was laid down by Philadelphia Navy Yard in 1839; built under the personal supervision of Commodore Matthew C. Perry; commissioned 22 December 1841, Capt. W. D. Salter in command; and launched several weeks later.
After several years of service in the Home Squadron, during which she performed experiments crucial to development of the steam Navy, Mississippi joined the West Indian Squadron in 1845 as flagship for Commodore Perry. During the Mexican War, she took part in expeditions against Alvarado, Tampico, Panuco, and Laguna do los Terminos, all successful in tightening American control of the Mexican coastline and interrupting coastwise commerce and military supply operations.
She returned to Norfolk for repairs 1 January 1847, then arrived Vera Cruz 21 March carrying Perry to take command of the American Fleet. At once she and her men plunged into amphibious operations against Vera Cruz, supplying guns and their crews to be taken ashore for the battery which fought the city to surrender in 4 days. Through the remainder of the war, Mississippi contributed guns, men, and boats to a series of coastal raids on Mexico’s east coast, taking part in the capture of Tobasco in June.
Mississippi cruised the Mediterranean during 1849-51, then returned to the United States to prepare for service as flagship in Commodore Perry’s momentous voyage to Japan. The squadron cleared Hampton Roads 24 November 1852, for Madeira, the Cape of Good Hope, Hong Kong, and Shanghai, which was reached 4 May 1853.
The squadron now approached Japan by calls in the Ryukyus and Bonins, and entered Tokyo Bay 8 July 1853. Commodore Perry proceeded, in one of the most difficult, skillful, and significant naval/diplomatic missions ever recorded, to negotiate a trade treaty with the Japanese, hitherto absolutely opposed to opening their country to Western trade and influence. After further cruising in the Far East, Mississippi and the squadron returned to Japan 12 February 1854 and 31 March the Treaty of Kanagawa was signed.
Mississippi returned to New York 23 April 1855, and again sailed for the Far East 19 August 1857, to base at Shanghai and patrol in support of America’s burgeoning trade with the Orient. As flagship for Commodore Josiah Tatnall, she was present during the British and French attack on the Chinese forts at Taku in June 1859, and 2 months later she landed a force at Shanghai when the American consul requested her aid in restoring order to city, torn by civil strife. She returned to ordinary at Boston in 1860, but was reactivated when the Civil War became inevitable. She arrived off Key West to institute the blockade there 8 June 1861, and 5 days later made her first capture, schooner Forest King bound with coffee from Rio de Janeiro to New Orleans. On 27 November, off Northeast Pass, Mississippi River, she joined Vincennes in capturing British bark Empress, again carrying coffee from Rio to New Orleans. The following spring she joined Farragut’s squadron for the planned assault on New Orleans. After several attempts, on 7 April 1862 she and Pensacola successfully passed over the bar at Southwest Pass, the heaviest ships ever to enter the river to that time.
As Farragut brought his fleet up the river, a key engagement was that with Forts Jackson and St. Philip 24 April, during which Mississippi ran Confederate ram Manassas ashore, wrecking her with two mighty broadsides. The city was now doomed, and Mississippi, her heavy draft making her less suitable to river operations than lighter ships, remained off New Orleans for much of the next year.
Ordered upriver for the operations against Port Hudson, Mississippi sailed with six other ships, lashed in pairs while she sailed alone. On 14 March 1863, she grounded while attempting to pass the forts guarding Port Hudson. Under enemy fire, every effort was made to refloat her by her commanding officer Capt. Melancthon Smith, and his executive officer, later to be famed as Admiral George Dewey. At last her machinery was destroyed, her battery spiked, and she was fired to prevent Confederate capture. When the flames reached her magazines, she blew up and sank. She had lost 64 killed, the ships in company saving 223 of her crew."
 

Tom McIntyre

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Wonderful bit of history John but if she sank/blew up in 1863 how do you suppose Oberg saved her crew in 1862? :confused:
 

John Cote

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Well, good question! Perhaps I have the wrong Mississippi, or perhaps the engraver got it wrong, or....well, I don't know.

Maybe Peter can chime in and tell us if this corresponds to what he has uncovered?
 

Jeff Hess

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The schooner General Harney, one of "the historic craft of the Sound" was CAptained by a Captain Oberg in 1865.


(found on the net)
 

Jeff Hess

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Here is an odd and perhaps only anecdotal entry to this thread.

EVery sinlge sea wreck presenation watch I have ever owned was not verifiable. EVery sinlge one I was not able to find the incidnet with the men named.

Odd.

Jeff
 

hc3

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Entirely different vessels. The ship that carried Perry was the USS (United States Ship) Mississippi, a large steam frigate of the U. S. Navu. The oberg ship would have been a commercial vessel- no way the USS Miss. would have been referred to as the "Am. Steamer".

But what a great watch.
 

Greg Frauenhoff

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Peter,

You have super watch. Thanks to you, John and Tom for the pictures/description/discussion.
 

John Cote

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Originally posted by hc3:
Entirely different vessels. The ship that carried Perry was the USS (United States Ship) Mississippi, a large steam frigate of the U. S. Navu. The oberg ship would have been a commercial vessel- no way the USS Miss. would have been referred to as the "Am. Steamer".
This makes sense to me. Thanks for the information. I guess I should not have assumed that the first ship I ran across named The Mississippi that sank during the Civil War, would be the ship refered to on the watch. My bad.
 
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Dave Chaplain

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Dunno ...

1. if she were the 1st steamer to join the Navy, she may have been refered to as Am. Steamer

2. if she was the heaviest and 1st to cross the sandbar at the mouth of the Mississippi River, her first few tries before succeeding probably resulted in one or more groundings - in 1862 - which could well have necessitated a rescue.

Nothing is proven, but I wouldn't rule this out just yet.
 

Dave Chaplain

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Here's an excerpt from a Mexican-American War correspondent, referring to the Naval ship Mississippi (from 1846):

"The American steamer Mississippi arrived at Vera Cruz on the 30th of March, and sailed again on the 31st, with Mr. Slidell, the American Minister, on board.Off Havannah on the 10th of April, the Medway met Her Majesty's ship Canopus, on her way to Halifax, New Brunswick, from Jamaica."
 

Dr. Jon

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While I always appreciate Jef Hess's contributions his note that he has never been able to find an account of presentation watch was especially interesting.


I have a later presentation watch, I really like it but its not in the same league with the one that started this thread. What it has in common is a very interesting presentee and absolutely no reference to the events described in the inscription, although even more interesting events of that Captain and that ship were reported later.

From that I have come to believe that these presentations were a way of buying silence. They commemorated events where real service was rendered but that it was not obvious to all involved and that the ship owners preferred that it not be made public.

On my watch the action was clearaly spelled out but probably was not evident except to the crew involved, certainly not the passengers and the steamship line prefered that the puiblic not be alarmed.

I had come that that theory before Jeff's post and I appreciate the support (or brickbats)
 

Modersohn

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Possibly this quotation, which I found, has some relevance in determining the identity of Capt. Oberg?

If this leads anywhere I will post further, but am confused as anyone by the possible derivation of the watch. it may be entirely irrelevant, since the schooner in question seems to have sailed in the American NW, therefore not likely in the appropriate vicinity.

[oops--somehow copied the wrong passage, and will have to re=find it tomorrow. It involved a Capt. Oberg. But what does Jeff Hess know further about the Oberg that he alluded to?]

Would Lincoln have given presentation medals or commemorations to allow the owners of commercial vessels to cover up the details of some untoward events at sea?

While the lack of historical record is interesting and suggestive, it's not clear what it's suggestive of, exactly.


Jessica
 

beta21

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I have not been able to find out much more than what's allready been written here. It's confusing that the watch is engraved 1862 and the Mississippi wrecked in 1863, but of course some other event than a total wreckage could have led to a rescue.
Tom, you write that the rules for giving these watches said "they were to be awarded to captains of foreign vessels for the rescue of American sailors at SEA" This ship didn't sink at sea, but on the river.
May be there are some kind of records in Washington about the circumstances round these watches??
Here's another thread about this http://history-sites.com/mb/cw/cwnavy/index.cgi?read=774
 

John Cote

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Well, how about this information from a January 1994 article in the "Morning Sentinel" of Waterville Maine by Osborne Ellis.

Ellis writes about 980 men of the 13th Maine being loaded with their gear aboard the steamer S.S. Mississippi (not the Frigate mentioned in the above article) in Boston for the trip to Ship Island Mississippi where they were to join General Benjamin Butler' forces. On the morning of February 28, 1862, the Mississippi with all aboard ran aground on Frying Pan Shoal off Cape Fear Lighthouse.

The article makes mention of a US Naval ship, the Gunboat Mount Vernon, coming to the rescue. It also mentions that the Mount Vernon was a much smaller vessel. I suppose it is possible that not all of the crew and troops could fit on the Mount Vernon, and that another ship in the area may have aided in the rescue. There is no mention of another ship that I can find. However, there is a lot of reference to bad seamanship and "stupidity" on the part of the Master of the Mississippi. There is also mention of the fact that the Mississippi was rushed into service before adequate sea trials were conducted. I suppose it is possible that detail of the incident were repressed to save embarrassment.
 

beta21

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John, this seems to be right on the spot! Very well done and thanks very much.
 

Dr. Jon

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In this case it may have been diplomatic necessity. The Brits we leaning towards the South and ruled the Sea. A Swedish Captain who aided the US Navy might have been a diplomatic problem and everyone involved may have found it beneficial to keep a foreign ship out of the news.

Similarly, Steamship lines much preferred for people to regard their ships as safe instead of being run by heroic captains.
 

John Cote

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All,

The whole exercise, of researching and writing about this watch, and the subsequent back and forth on this and other internet forums brings out for me some interesting thoughts about history and the internet as a research tool.

The internet had made it much easier to find references to written and graphic material on almost any subject including horology and maritime history. It has also made it much easier for interested parties to correspond and get feedback from their colleagues. However, what I have seen here goes a long way towards confirming for me that, just because it is easier to get lots of information, does not mean that people will therefore necessarily come to valid conclusions on a subject more often. In fact, if one is not careful, it is easy to find something in print, draw a wrong conclusion and then write and spread that wrong conclusion again on the internet to what ever audience is ready to read it.

I am not saying that the same thing did not happen when people had to go to the library to do research. We know it happened. However, now it is so much easier for people with no research training to find material which looks like it relates to their search, but which in reality may have nothing to do with what they are looking for. If this material leads them down the path to a false conclusion, which they then publish on the internet and which is subsequently read and assumed to be true by anyone else who is interested, history is distorted. With the internet, history is distorted much more often and easily.

I need to remember this not only when I am doing my own research, but when I am looking at conclusions drawn by other internet horology bloggers.
 

John Cote

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By the way, it is probably just as easy to draw bad conclusions about 16s Bunn Specials as it is about a Nashua...'cause there is more information out there....good and bad. ;)
 

Dave Chaplain

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John is so right about that! Inferences must point to source documentation, and assumptions must be stated as such. Those things by themselves would go a long way in weeding out the more valuable material from the less valuable. Now if only we could be sure that original documentation is absolutely correct!

And by example, nothing I've read here points conclusively to the origin of Peter's watch.

In any case, I love Peter's watch and would like to own it. I do know about this extremly rare Omega keywind, which I confirmed in person that even the Omega museum in Bienne / Biel does not have, that might be available for trade ... ;~))

:biggrin:
 

Modersohn

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Clearly one must view all information, on or off the internet, with a critical eye.

This is especially true here, since most of us aren't trained historians, and most internet sources are questionable and lacking proper documentation.

The reliability of sources and also the amount of time we have to devote to pinning down authenticity or verifying facts or theories is limited.

Serious esearch is labor-intensive, in part because it involves subsidiary consdieration of rebutting, or confuting evidence. Thus, one must go beyond simply finding evidence, to checking the existence of other, as yet undetermined, counterevidence.

John Cote's last contribution (factual one, that is) seems like a great advance in explaining the question here.

I myself would love more clarification of the denomination of various types and qualities of ships during the civil war period, since many merchant ships were called into combat. But I do think if we check one another, and keep the dialogue going, we can do valid historical research.

Constant reconfirmation of claims, which often are repeated word for word from one "source" to another--without any independent sourcing, or footnoting-- is so important.

I'm really pleased, though, with this discussion.

Jessica
 

Dr. Jon

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I based my supposition on these watches being the only reference to an event on
1) Jeff's observation on the watches has had
2) My own research on a watch with some similarlity in being presentation to a Captain who prevented a maritome disaster.

While I used mostly internet resources, they were primarily the digitized archives of the New York Times and the Brooklyn Shipping News. In the case of my watch these sources produced significant biographical information on my recipeint descriptions of a minor event at sea and an epic tale of heroic actions when the ship encountered a hurricane but absolutely nothing on the incident described by the inscription of the watch.

I similarly searched the New York Times archive for information on the SS Mississippi and Captain Oberg and found nothing I could relate to the incident of the inscription. There were references to the ship and to Ben Butler's campaign at New Orleans.

I have a lot of issues with the way the current New York Times "reports" the news as it sees it but their on line archive is, except for being electronicly searchable, an original source document. It was not a prominenet a source then as it became in the 1880's but it was operating and reported extensively on maritme events. Hopefully it was more objective than it is today and better researched but it is still about as reliable a source as there is. Right or wrong it is authenticaly contemporary.



It seems that the events that would motivate such a presentation and the presentations themselves would be newsworthy, the lack of news on tihs is surprising, at least by modern standards.

My hypothesis that there was no reporting on the incidents is a tad hard to footnote.
 

Dave Chaplain

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I find John Cotes information from the "Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, Department of the Navy, Naval Historical Center, Washington Navy Yard, Washington, DC." to be the most interesting and factual.

The additional excerpt I found through Google from the Mexican-American War correspondent was also interesting to me as it:
a) corroborates the history and whereabouts of the American steamer Mississippi
b) notes that Minister Slidell, a New Orleans plantation owner now with a city named after him, was on-board her

This ship had quite a wonderful history and was obviousy a "important" ship based on who it carried and what roles it played. To me, this would make any accident it might be involved in very newsworthy, and warrant a presentation watch to any Capt who came to her side.

John's 1st note indicated the Mississippi was the first heavy ship to cross the sand bar at South Pass. The results of this monumentous incident directly led to the fall of New Orleans early in the Civil War as there was no militia mass stationed there at the time as no one believed heavy ships could approach the city from the South. When they did succeed, they were positioned literally a rocks throw from the center of the city, and it fell in short order. The loss was a devasting blow to the Confederates.

Anyway, back to the ship. If it failed on several occasions to cross the bar in 1862, an area that had many foreign ships waiting at bay for the Union Navy to allow passage through the river to New Orleans, there would have been ample opportunity for a foreign ship at sea (in the Gulf of Mexico) to come to the rescue of the grounded Mississippi. And not jut any ship grounded but one with such an illustruous history as the Mississippi had, which would make for great PR.

The other story of the 'lesser Mississippi' explicitly identifies a smaller US Naval ship as the one that came to the rescue. If Oberg was the Capt. of that smaller vessel, his name would beon the ranksof Civil War vets - which I've not been able to find.

If I were Peter - I'd stay on the trail of the 'greater Mississippi' that sank in 1863.

All of this is great discussion!

Dave
 

Tom McIntyre

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Dave,

I ran across the wording of the legislation a couple of years ago, but I am virtually certain that the awards were only to foreign captains.

An American commander and particularly one under arms would not have been eligible. Of course, the watch in question may have preceded the legislation and the watch may have been the model for the others.
 

Modersohn

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Tom's point is very much to the point, I think. If the Captains were not American, they may not have been thought sufficiently important to note in news stories.

Also, I wouldn't assume that the newspapers of the 19th C. were more accurate about anything than those of today.

Still, today, despite globalization, newspaper statistisc reporting the number of people who've died in,the Iraq war usually means the number of American's who've died. Avoiding all politics, still it's relevant that non-US citizens often just don't seem as tangible or graspable as US citizens involved in an episode.

For example, in the grounding of the Mississippi at the Shoal, and during several other incidents, there was tremendous chaos and threatened loss of life. The news accounts that I found were quite vague about who, exactly, came to rescue the ship (or to keep it from being swamped).

Whether there are other sources that givec greater detail, I really would doubt that the year on the watch is wrong. Could be, but seems somehow unlikely,.

Jessica
 

Dr. Jon

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I think John Cote's article is the best candidate for the incident. It is possible that a Foreign ship would be near Cape Fear.

It is very unlikely that any foreign merchantmen or military vessels were near New Orleans. That was a combat zone. Any merchantemn in tha rea would have been carrying cargo for the Confederacy would have stayed clear of the US Navy.

Near Cape Fear the same conditions apply but there was no active combat. Still, a Naval Vessel would have been under orders to impound a foreign cargo in that area. The whole idea was blockade and this means preventing ships from delivering cargo to the Confederacy.

Such a ship coming to the aid of a Naval vessel would be in keeping with maritime tradition but a big problem. The recued would be still under orders to seize the cargo from the rescuer. If Oberg was there with two Naval vessels the negotiations between Captains must have been interesting. No one involved would want the incident in the news. This is possible, but unlikely.

I still think it was an unrecorded event.
 

Dave Chaplain

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At the start of the Civil War, New Orleans was 2nd largest port (behind New York) in North America.

"As the war went on, the naval forces, securing the cooperation of small bodies of troops, gradually obtained a foothold at various points and converted the blockade into a military occupation. These points then became the headquarters of the different squadrons--ports for rendezvous, refitment, and supply, for the "repairs and coal" that were forever drawing away the blockaders from their stations at critical moments. By the spring of 1862 all the squadrons were well provided in this respect, though some of the centres of occupation were occasionally recovered by the enemy. Especially on the coast of Texas, blockade and occupation alternated at the different Passes throughout the war, partly in consequence of the want of troops to hold the occupied points. Curiously enough, too, these centres of occupation became in a small way centres of blockade-running--Nassaus and Bermudas on a diminutive scale. Norfolk, Beaufort in North Carolina, Hilton Head with its sutler's shops, Pensacola, and New Orleans each carried on a trade, prosperous as far as it went, with the surrounding coast. At New Orleans, the blockade of Lake Ponchartrain was kept up long after the city was taken, not to prevent access to the port, but to capture the illicit traders that cleared from it; and Farragut was obliged to remonstrate sharply with the Collector for the readiness with which papers covering the trade were issued by the custom-house."
Source: "The Blockade and the Cruisers" (Chapter 2) by James Russell Soley

It appears that altough illegal, the Customs House in New Orleans continued to offer papers to those imports successful in entering the port, and those successful in exporting goods out. New Orleanians are famous for their disregard for government authority ...
 

Dave Chaplain

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Dave Chaplain

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I love this stuff ...

FOREIGN AND COLONIAL NEWS: AMERICA.
The Illustrated London News, vol. 42, no. 1199, p. 422.

April 18, 1863

FOREIGN AND COLONIAL NEWS.
AMERICA.
By the arrival of the Inman steamer Etna we have telegrams from New York to the morning of the 4th inst.

War News.
The Federal accounts of the partially successful attempt of Commodore Farragut to pass the Port Hudson batteries have at length seen the light. The Hartford, the flagship, accompanied by the Albatross, advanced to the attack, followed by five other steamers. The Port Hudson batteries opened upon them, and an engagement ensued, which lasted from ten o'clock at night until daybreak on the next day (Sunday). The Hartford and the Albatross passed safely. All the other vessels were driven back, except the steamer Mississippi, which grounded immediately opposite Port Hudson, and was blown up by order of her commander. Sixty of her crew were killed or missing. Upon the other vessels ten men, including Commander Cumming, were killed and thirty wounded. Confederate accounts state that only two men in the Port Hudson batteries were wounded. Fears are entertained by the Federals lest their two isolated vessels fall a victim to the three steam-rams in the possession of the Confederates.
 

Jeff Hess

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This one has me reeling. I have searched the net until my fingers feel like mush.

Nada. Zip.

Drives me crazy. As I said earlier in the thread, every "Rescue watch" that I have owned, (none Waltham) had unverifiable circumstances.

Most I have had have been other brands. Most I have kind of written off as fakes. This one looks very very real and I firmly beleive it is real. But it just drives me crazy. This has turned into a late night habit. "Trying to find Oberg again?" is not something I ever thought I would hear my wife say over and over late at nite.......

Jeff
 

Clint Geller

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Alas, this very interesting thread is so old that all of the links given in the beginning posts are now broken. Can they be fixed?
 
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John Cote

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Alas, this very interesting thread is so old that all of the links given in the beginning posts are now broken. Can they be fixed?
Due to a lot of issues to stupid and numerous to detail, the links are broken. One of these days when life calms down I will do my best to resurrect the site and the links. I will probably have to be after my duties on the NAWCC board are over.
 
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Tom McIntyre

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The AWCo pieces and Interstate Time are both available on the Internet Archive. It appears that you protected all the images on InterstateTime.com so those are not available in the archive.

I was surprised to see that you had let your registration expire, although the "harvesters" are not asking very much for it. :)
 

Tom McIntyre

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I have 14 domains that I have been paying $8 to $15/year for about 12 years now. I have been offered $10,000 for mcintyre.com three or four times over the past few years. I have owned it since the early 1980's. I have owned AWCo.org since the 90's.

I just bought a new Waltham wristwatch for about the same money.

I do resent that those I consider Internet grave robbers are making that kind of money. In some cases the "sale" replacements are ntentionally offensive to coerce you into rescuing the domain.

There is the associated scam that tries to get domain name owners to pay outrageous renewal fees for domains that they do own by mailing "urgent" renewal notices to those they see are due for renewal even though those solicitors are not the current registrar.
 

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