Farmer's Daughter Cuckoo Animation-how to make Man Climb Ladder

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by KBPinNH, Oct 29, 2017.

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  1. KBPinNH

    KBPinNH Registered User

    May 24, 2016
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    My Farmer's Daughter Cuckoo is working beautifully except I have no idea how to assemble the
    rotation wheel for the man to climb the ladder. I know the music runs and man climbs the ladder at the same time.

    I purchased this clock from eBay to overhaul. This is my 7th cuckoo I have worked on, so I am still an apprentice.

    If anyone has a picture of what the wheel mechanism that moves the man on the ladder, looks like, it would be so helpful! I may be missing some pieces.

    I have attached the parts that I have.
    Man Ladder, hook that moves the man with a brass weight on the end (inside) IMG_3529.JPG IMG_3530.JPG IMG_3531.JPG
    Brass frame, rotation wheel, steel axis, black rubber piece to slide on axis, clear plastic tube.

    Issues: I don't see what moves the axis, attached to the rotation wheel. The axis ( steel nail) rotates freely and can come in and out freely.
    How does the music chain catch onto the rubber ? And how does the rubber move the axis when they don't catch each other and rotate freely.
    Is my axis piece worn down?

    perplexed, much appreciation for your help:)
     
  2. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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    Jan 1, 2005
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    Pliz show us a pic of the front of the clock.
     
  3. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

    Aug 17, 2014
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    Ahem:

    Farmer's daughter. Man. Ladder.

    I am shocked and horrified.

    M Kinsler

    Then what happens?
     
  4. KBPinNH

    KBPinNH Registered User

    May 24, 2016
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    31B5A7D7-CBBE-4DF1-8C23-4705C72B6C12.jpeg 4C3EF628-C7E4-4B98-A3EC-4D8FC705BACA.jpeg 7CA1CFF1-FD16-4478-ABF8-36A67097ABAB.jpeg 4141B622-B5C0-4055-9FCE-9C9849322574.jpeg 1201191D-934B-4406-9869-F274D44B958A.jpeg 3FBFB944-8633-428A-8370-E4295B95D156.jpeg 89D2DCCF-D1F1-465E-8CCD-A6835CE310A2.jpeg 31B5A7D7-CBBE-4DF1-8C23-4705C72B6C12.jpeg 4C3EF628-C7E4-4B98-A3EC-4D8FC705BACA.jpeg 7CA1CFF1-FD16-4478-ABF8-36A67097ABAB.jpeg Thank you for asking,
    I have posted a picture of this Schmeckenbecher clock Farmers Daughter or The Elopement Clock
    My sequential pics show how the man can be pulled up the ladder from a hook coming from the inside. He drops down by counterweight on the inside.
    If anyone has a working clock and could post a close up picture of the inside mechanism which moves the man on the ladder, I could figure this out.
    Thx for your time,
     
  5. JTD

    JTD Registered User

    Sep 27, 2005
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    Mr Kinsler, don't be too shocked! Actually, nothing much happened. This is not showing an elopement, it is depicting the old south German/Austrian custom called 'fensterln'. The young man shows the young lady that he is serious about her by risking her father's anger by climbing up to her window and/or entering her room, where they spend some happy hours before he departs down the ladder.

    In olden days in country villages it was very difficult for young people to meet openly, still less to show affection to each other, and 'fensterln' was a way of getting round the strict moral etiquette of the day. More often than not, even though the Father was supposed to be furious, he often knew what was going on and turned a blind eye, providing he approved of the prospective son-in-law.

    It's a nice clock, hope the young man doesn't have to wait too long before you can enable him to visit his girl.

    JTD
     
  6. KBPinNH

    KBPinNH Registered User

    May 24, 2016
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    Excellent local folklore! I will save this with the clock.
    I do hope to get the young moving soon:/
    Thx!
     
  7. Chris D

    Chris D Registered User

    Sep 8, 2009
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    Here's a pic of how it should look. Your two main issues are the rubber pulley is worn out and the "axis" isn't attached to the pulley. It should be one solid shaft with the "axis" attached on the end with the set screw. Your best option is to get one of these BLACK FOREST IMPORTS, INC - Parts & Accessories - Cuckoo Clocks | Chain & Chain Parts - Cuckoo | Chain Pully Case Guide - Cuckoo | N/A | but it's not going to be easy. You need to flip the shaft so it looks like yours. Problem is one side is reduced and then has a clip on the end to hold it together. So when you flip it, one hole will need to be opened up and the other would get a bushing to make it smaller. You may be able to use your bracket, but I have a feeling someone may have modified it.


    IMG_20171030_083616229.jpg
     
  8. KBPinNH

    KBPinNH Registered User

    May 24, 2016
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    Hi Chris,
    Super instructions and picture.

    I will be back later on with an update after I order the parts. I hope I can reuse my bracket.

    I am quite sure this clock has been modified a few times. I had quite a few adjustments to make along the way of reassembling.
    I also see two sets of scew holes to hold the pulley bracket to the housing.
    And, the "nail axis" is too long - rubbing the clock mechanism.
    So - on the right track thanks to your help from this forum!! And, I am excited to know the history depicted by this folk scene!! Double bonus! I will be back soon.
    Thanks for your time!!
     
  9. KBPinNH

    KBPinNH Registered User

    May 24, 2016
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    I have the mechanism working. I did order the rubber wheel on the shaft that you recommended.
    After all, I reused my nail axis, replaced the rubber wheel from my new part, shortened and anchored the nail so it would not pull out, and stabilized the nail axis with the rubber wheel, so it would move the nail axis when the chain rubbed the wheel. All is great. Tricky, with success. I will post a video link soon. Thanks to these forum replies.
     

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