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Family Jewelry clock of unknown background

Jabrams

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Dec 3, 2020
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My family had a jewelry store in south Arkansas dating back to the late 1800. At some point in the early part of the store my great great grandfather got a large regulator floor clock. We have a picture of it in the store we think from 1890s. Over time the store has gone out of business but my father ended up with the clock a after his death it was passed to me. It is an amazing part of our family but we know very little about it. The story is a family member brought the clock over from Europe but we have no proof of it. We can not find any marks on the clock to help give us some history on it. I know the mercury glass vials we’re broken during the move to my parents house and we are going to look for a replacement if possible. If anyone could give us a hint on the the history of this wonderful piece we would appreciate it. We are trying to understand more of how it fits in our family prior to the store.
Thank you so much

F167C879-1449-4D92-A1F4-BA709FC9CCD2.jpeg A0E2EDA3-EB20-4411-9966-696602646DA6.jpeg B3EAA1A1-0573-4887-A81A-2715A97D9215.jpeg D0E04FDE-BD01-4357-93BD-4B977EB036F2.jpeg 5B379B74-C74F-4146-8EB5-DE0F7A3B71D1.jpeg 85112110-9B79-4209-A5A1-5F2CA5BD690F.jpeg
 

Jmeechie

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Dec 8, 2010
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Hi and welcome. What a beautiful clock! This style of clock is referred to as a Jewelers Regulator and the movement was more than likely made in the region of France /Switzerland. Unfortunately there isn’t much information available on makers. These style of clocks were centerpieces in a jewelers as they were very accurate as well as status for the shop! It appears the dial is brass and may have been silvered at one time. It is also missing its sweep second hand. As far as age the style of movement range from around 1860 to 1930’s ish. I’m suspecting your clock is possibly around 1880‘s but there’ll be others along shortly with more knowledge. A lot of these clocks cases were produced here in America with only the movements and pendulums being imported.
As far as the mercury vials there will be a lot of debate on using or not mercury. Personally the cost of I’ll suspect around 10 lbs of mercury may sway you to using an alternative like silver foil lined vials filled with lead shot! The pendulums on these movements usually were around 13 lbs.
Cheers,
James
 
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Joeydeluxed

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from my failing memory I believe your clock to be an Ansonia or a Seth Thomas. I'll pull out my books later and look up the exact model number. By the way, your clock appears to be missing its sweep second hand that attaches through the hole in the center of the other 2 hands.
 

Grant Perry

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It does resemble the #11 regulator from Ansonia in Tran’s book. The hands look different, but may have been replaced? It indicates 1880 for a
date. I didn’t find anything close in the Seth Thomas regulators, but I’m sure others may be able to confirm the identity.
 
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Jabrams

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Wow that looks to be it. Thank you all so much. The clock mystery is solved. We will always cherish it but to learn more about the history is wonderful. Now to get it working. Thank you all.
 

Jabrams

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Thank you. Makes us a smile when we look at it. I was wondering what these metal inserts in the wood are for. They are in the bottom of the cabinet area. They have holes almost like air vents. They do but come out that I can tell but have not pulled much.
Again thank you all for the help as we learn all about our wonderful family treasure.

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bruce linde

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if it were mine, i would re-silver the dial and find appropriate hands... including the sweep second hand jewelers regulators are known for... that last bit might require some effort as there is a piece that screws into place that acts as a bushing for the front escape wheel arbor that holds the second hand.... some closeer-up photos might help.
 

Dick C

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Oct 14, 2009
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Thank you. Makes us a smile when we look at it. I was wondering what these metal inserts in the wood are for. They are in the bottom of the cabinet area. They have holes almost like air vents. They do but come out that I can tell but have not pulled much.
Again thank you all for the help as we learn all about our wonderful family treasure.

View attachment 625627 View attachment 625628
This is a guess....they may be screwed in to the base in order to secure the top to the base. Look at the crack in the base in line with the two possible screws. I would be careful before any further movement of the clock.
 

bruce linde

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The best way to move it is to remove the pendulum carefully and then remove the movement from the case… In other words reduce the weight as much as possible.

I would also consider having a specialist come out and check for mercury contamination… You’re probably OK, but better safe than sorry
 

BrendanD

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Jul 15, 2014
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Hi and welcome. What a beautiful clock! This style of clock is referred to as a Jewelers Regulator and the movement was more than likely made in the region of France /Switzerland. Unfortunately there isn’t much information available on makers. These style of clocks were centerpieces in a jewelers as they were very accurate as well as status for the shop! It appears the dial is brass and may have been silvered at one time. It is also missing its sweep second hand. As far as age the style of movement range from around 1860 to 1930’s ish. I’m suspecting your clock is possibly around 1880‘s but there’ll be others along shortly with more knowledge. A lot of these clocks cases were produced here in America with only the movements and pendulums being imported.
As far as the mercury vials there will be a lot of debate on using or not mercury. Personally the cost of I’ll suspect around 10 lbs of mercury may sway you to using an alternative like silver foil lined vials filled with lead shot! The pendulums on these movements usually were around 13 lbs.
Cheers,
James
It looks like a Waterbury, with the pinwheel and all..
 

bruce linde

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Did you see Post # 4 above?
and, waterbury (and, i assume, ansonia) used swiss pinwheel movements... until they didn't. waterbury started making their own and my later no. 8 has a waterbury movement with deadbeat escapement.
 

Steven Thornberry

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and, waterbury (and, i assume, ansonia) used swiss pinwheel movements... until they didn't. waterbury started making their own and my later no. 8 has a waterbury movement with deadbeat escapement.
They did, but the clock has been identified as an Ansonia. What’s your point?