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Factory Marking on Kienzle Clock

KurtinSA

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Nov 24, 2014
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I'm working on this Kienzle clock. I think it is dated to 1912-1913. It's always interesting to find new things on these clocks. As seen in the other picture, this back plate has a serial number and that is also on the inside of the front plate as well as on the underside of the pendulum. There were marks on the inside of the spring barrel as well as the barrel cover and the winding arbor...I didn't take pictures of those before I finished servicing the barrel. But there are more markings and some I hadn't seen before.

Kienzle was known to put "hash" marks on the webs of the wheels...I've circled a single hash mark on the first wheel. The there were two more serial numbers. One is inside the circle at the top. This part is the bridge that holds the intermediate wheel onto the front plate. They took the trouble to stamp the full serial number on the flat part. The other arrow points to the inside view of the holder for the anchor pivot. They stamped the serial number around the circle of the part holder. I've also shown what the front side of the front plate looks like for a reference to these two items.

I had never seen this kind of detail before.

Kurt

27KienzleFrt.jpg KienzleMarks.jpg KienzleFrtPlt.jpg
 
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etmb61

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I have a similar clock #126176. I'll have to take a look at it now. My parts movement #102188 has only the last 3 digits inside the front plate and only the last digit on the smaller parts. Interesting.

Eric
 

KurtinSA

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Something else is strange. The front plate has a number of extra holes that are either threaded or through holes...some are even countersunk. I wonder if a mistake was made and they reused the plate somehow. Or the blank could have been used for another model Kienzle clock.

Kurt

KienzleFrtHoles.jpg
 

etmb61

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A number of clocks made in that serial number range were the calendar clocks. That's what the extra holes are for. I checked my clock and it doesn't have the extra holes or the extra digits on the front plate or small parts.

Eric
 

KurtinSA

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Nov 24, 2014
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I'm on to another Kienzle clock and found different stampings inside the clock. The back plate serial number is 110235, so likely about 1911 date. I found "235" on the inside of the front plate and the numbers "55" inside the barrel and cover as well as on the winding arbor. Also, on the intermediate wheel bridge and the inside of the front plate pivot holder it also has "55" stamped on them. Interesting that in this case "55" is used but that is not part of the original serial number. What struck me on the clock I previously posted above was the extent they went to to get the full serial number on the pivot holder and wheel bridge. Not that on this somewhat earlier clock.

Kurt

26KienzleFrt.jpg
 

Dells

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Oct 18, 2019
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I have just stripped the JUF with marble base ( double elephant) and on the inside of the plates and barrel are the numbers 3 and 40 I can understand one number to match parts but why the extra number ?
Dell
 

KurtinSA

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I don't remember if there's been a discussion about the numbering. But I wonder if one number is to keep parts together for the clock, and the other number represents the specific worker doing the assembly. :?|

Kurt
 

Dells

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Sounds reasonable Kurt but we will probably never know.
Dell
 

etmb61

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Kienzle made a lot of other types of clocks in addition to torsion clocks. I would think that their shop practices, such as numbering movement parts, would be apparent in their other types of clocks.

Just a thought.

Eric
 

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