Evil Vienna update

Fitzclan

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Interesting and informative thread. We're All pulling for you Bangs. I know you won't rest until it purrs, and it will...
 

bangster

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Well, I'm back to this.

Shucked it down. No noticeable wear in pivot holes. Smooth broached them earlier. Polished pivots again earlier. Re-bushed front winding arbor pivots.
Spotted no obvious conflict between wheels & pinions.

Back together oiled and on test stand.

Runs strongly for 2 or 3 minutes, pendulum loses amplitude, suddenly stops. Does same thing several times. Obvious diagnosis: EW not getting enough juice to power the pendulum.

Right?

Spotted no power bandits inside the movement. If they are hiding there, I cain't see them. Maybe not enough power being input. Weight is 3 lb. Jacked it up to 4 lb.
That oughtta drive the pendulum. Right?

Didn't. No change in behavior. Diagnosis probably wrong: not lack of power to EW
OR power thief in movement strong enough to overcome 4 lb weights. Hiding where?

With all the hours I have invested in this creature, I can't afford to declare defeat and give it back without payment. But I may have to. If the patient dies, the doctor still gets paid. If the clock won't come to life, the clocksmith hasn't fulfilled his half of the deal. I wouldn't know how to charge a customer for not fixing his clock.

I need to get this sumbidge out of my life, and on to other clocks a-waiting.
 

R. Croswell

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Well, I'm back to this.

Shucked it down. No noticeable wear in pivot holes. Smooth broached them earlier. Polished pivots again earlier. Re-bushed front winding arbor pivots.
Spotted no obvious conflict between wheels & pinions.

Back together oiled and on test stand.

Runs strongly for 2 or 3 minutes, pendulum loses amplitude, suddenly stops. Does same thing several times. Obvious diagnosis: EW not getting enough juice to power the pendulum.

Right?

Spotted no power bandits inside the movement. If they are hiding there, I cain't see them. Maybe not enough power being input. Weight is 3 lb. Jacked it up to 4 lb.
That oughtta drive the pendulum. Right?

Didn't. No change in behavior. Diagnosis probably wrong: not lack of power to EW
OR power thief in movement strong enough to overcome 4 lb weights. Hiding where?

With all the hours I have invested in this creature, I can't afford to declare defeat and give it back without payment. But I may have to. If the patient dies, the doctor still gets paid. If the clock won't come to life, the clocksmith hasn't fulfilled his half of the deal. I wouldn't know how to charge a customer for not fixing his clock.

I need to get this sumbidge out of my life, and on to other clocks a-waiting.
So far we have mostly focused on "power bandits inside the movement". I believe we ruled out issues with the strike train while keeping in mind that it is normal for the strike train to rob a little power going into warning. One thing we have not looked at is the escapement. I don't think we have even see a picture of it. Assuming that you have enough weight, and no bandits in the going train, what's left is the escapement and the coupling (crutch) to the pendulum. But we all know the definition of "assume", so can you first please verify the following:

1) There has been NO bushing work done (by you or others in the past) anywhere in the going train except the winding arbor bushing you just did.
2) ALL the pivots have a mirror bright polished finish.
3) There is no more than the slightest side-to-side clearance of pivots in the pivot holes
4) ALL arbors have some discernible "end shake"

You could do one more test for bandits by removing the verge and determining how much wright (force) is requires to start the wheels turning. This going train starts and stops each tick. It proves nothing that it will spin up and does not jamb. Its the power requires to take it from stop to going that's critical. Perhaps the best way is to replace the weight with a container and add or remove "junk" until the train will just start to turn on its own each time after you stop it. I don't know just how much weight it should require but my gut tells me that it has to be something less than 1 lb.

Now if the train is free of bandits, can you please post some still pictures and a video (at least a minute or two in length) of the escapement in operation?

The symptoms you are experiencing are not unlike when the boundary between the impulse face and dead face of the pallet is rounded off, or the RW tooth is landing on the boundary instead if the dead face, or if there is excessive lock. You want the EW teeth to land just on the dead side of the boundary. Don't make the mistake of going for maximum lock to increase pendulum swing. The impulse face transfers the power. Excessive lock just demands that the pendulum swing further on the same amount of impulse power. If it has Vulliamy-type pallets that have been messed with it can be challenging at best to get them right. Do you know if that is the case?

RC
 

tom427cid

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Hey Bang,
A thought just occurred to me a while back I had a similar problem and after polishing the pallets etc. they were inadvertently installed reversed. Funny thing is they looked fine. But clock exhibited the problems you describe.
Might have a look at the angles of the pallets.
Hope this might help.
tom
 

Colin Drake

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Hey Bang,
A thought just occurred to me a while back I had a similar problem and after polishing the pallets etc. they were inadvertently installed reversed. Funny thing is they looked fine. But clock exhibited the problems you describe.
Might have a look at the angles of the pallets.
Hope this might help.
tom
I would agree. When it comes to Vienna regulators that I get in for repair, roughly 1 in 10 have the escapement out of adjustment. It is always critical to confirm that the escapement is functioning properly.

As far as troubleshooting clocks here is my advice for those looking to improve.

There will always be a distinct problem. There should never be any "maybe" or "what if" in the scenario. By correcting for such "what if" situations, you can often times end up shooting your self in the foot, and then be forced to go back and undo the damage you may have done after the true problem presents itself.

It is human nature to jump to conclusions, often mislabeling "correlations" as "proof" and accepting things they hear most to be fact without question. This is how we get things like the belief that removing blood from your body will make you healthy , getting stabbed with needles will take relieve your back ache, or the belief that when a clock won't run, more grease and oil will help. The thing is, we are terrible at drawing accurate conclusions, and we do it particularly when we think we are great at it. It is easy to assume something, but it is another thing to prove that corporations are suppressing many thousands of cancer researchers world wide from releasing their cure or that the US military planed to invade Texas because empty Walmarts were being used to store shipping containers (by Walmart). It may sound off topic, but being able to catch myself assuming something thing rather than proving it has really helped to take the guesswork out of trouble shooting clocks.

To trouble shoot a clock I always say to start from the ground up (Ideally this is all done as it's assembled). Check each and every part one at a time. Move on to the next part only when you can say with confidence that one part is in good functioning order, and all of it's interactions with the other components of the clock are as intended. This must be done throughout the movement. These things are not magic, nor are they haunted. They are machines that operate entirely upon simple physics. What works on paper will work in real life. If you can't say with confidence that the clock will run, there is no point in testing it. No amount of crossed fingers will prevent the problem returning with a vengeance.

If you don't know how two things should interact, look it up and figure it out. If you do know how the two should interact, challenge your understanding. The belief that one has nothing left to learn is a sure sign that they don't know quite as much as they think they do. In a scientific study, those who rated themselves highest when it came to their understanding of logic went on to receive the lowest scores.

It may sound like a lot of effort, but once you get the hang of it, it should only take a half an hour or so, and it can save days of frustration.
 

R. Croswell

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I would agree. When it comes to Vienna regulators that I get in for repair, roughly 1 in 10 have the escapement out of adjustment. It is always critical to confirm that the escapement is functioning properly.(emphasis added)
This is absolutely true, but unfortunately, I'm afraid that many inexperienced operators, especially those who's experience is mostly with over-powered American clocks with recoil escapements, may incorrectly conclude that a precision escapement is functioning properly when it isn't. It is easy for one to conclude that an escapement is functioning as it should as long as it "tick- tocks" when the pendulum is swung and doesn't hang up or skip teeth. Two big problems surrounding the type of escapement usually found in movements such as we are discussing are: 1) someone who doesn't understand all they know has already messed with the escapement, and 2) In an attempt to "fix" a clock that won't run one jumps to the conclusion without proof that the escapement IS the problem and proceeds to adjust everything that can be adjusted whether it is the problem or not thereby creating additional issues.

One critical parameter is the lift angle of the impulse face. If the pallets have been free-hand ground or reversed the lift angle(s) may be off Dave LaBounty posted this easy method to check lift angles; http://www.abouttime-clockmaking.com/downloads/Finding the Lift Angles.pdf Typically the lift is about 2 degrees. Too steep a lift angle can be like starting a stick-shift car in 3rd. gear. A few years ago I had a similar issue with a clock that wouldn't keep running. Everything checked perfect and the lift angle was 2 degrees. After consulting with an expert, I reduced the lift angle to 1.5 degrees to give the pallets a little more mechanical advantage (like shifting into a lower gear) after which the clock ran perfectly. I would caution against changing any design parameters unless one is sure there is no other problem and/or something has been previously altered.

There will always be a distinct problem. There should never be any "maybe" or "what if" in the scenario. By correcting for such "what if" situations, you can often times end up shooting your self in the foot, and then be forced to go back and undo the damage you may have done after the true problem presents itself.
Good advice generally, but wear can affect many parts, and combined with improper adjustments, and such things as previously install bushings with incorrect depthing, etc, it is not uncommon for a clock to present for repair that has more than one distinct problem. The point is still well taken - identify the problem before fixing it or one is likely to generate more problems.

RC
 
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Colin Drake

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Good advice generally, but wear can affect many parts, and combined with improper adjustments, and such things as previously install bushings with incorrect depthing, etc, it is not uncommon for a clock to present for repair that has more than one distinct problem. The point is still well taken - identify the problem before fixing it or one is likely to generate more problems.RC
Yes, I said a whole lot more than I meant to, and didn't totally read it through. I am just glad that I was able to get a point in there somewhere.
 
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tom427cid

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These things are not magic, nor are they haunted. They are machines that operate entirely upon simple physics. What works on paper will work in real life. If you can't say with confidence that the clock will run, there is no point in testing it. No amount of crossed fingers will prevent the problem returning with a vengeance..
Since we all know Murphy's Law I would like to share the second and more important half.
Ofca's collory states that "All mechanical objects are inherently hostile".
Hope this helps.
tom
 

R. Croswell

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Since we all know Murphy's Law I would like to share the second and more important half.
Ofca's collory states that "All mechanical objects are inherently hostile".
Hope this helps.
tom
Well Tom, I think "Ofca's collory" is something of an oxymoron. Hostility is an emotional response not "simple physics". Simple machines obeying the laws of physics are incapable of emotion and therefore incapable of hostility. If one accepts that mechanical clocks can be hostile, then we acknowledge that they can have "attitude". If they have attitude then they CAN be evil, which is what Bangs originally concluded. It therefore follows that he should make no further attempt to repair this clock and seek the services of an exorcist before it takes serious revenge and attempts to physically injure him.

"Twilight zone physics" is interesting stuff. I have one clock that isn't evil and runs fine except when is realizes that I have brought in another clock, It then gets jealous and will stop until I move the new clock to another room. Now I'm not sure if the clock itself - a mechanical device that is supposed to have no emotions - is doing this, or if some evil spirit as possessed it.........but lets not go there, I have to sleep tonight!

RC
 

G J M

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"Twilight zone physics" is interesting stuff. I have one clock that isn't evil and runs fine except when is realizes that I have brought in another clock, It then gets jealous and will stop until I move the new clock to another room. Now I'm not sure if the clock itself - a mechanical device that is supposed to have no emotions - is doing this, or if some evil spirit as possessed it.........but lets not go there, I have to sleep tonight!

RC[/QUOTE]

I think a lot of machinery big or small can have a personality. What the difference is?
I have a clock that will run fine anywhere in the house as long as the dial is facing north or south but no matter where it is it will only run five minutes or so with the dial facing east or west.
I have to sleep also so rather than it being possessed I blame it on the magnetic pull from the north pole.
G
 

bangster

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(a) It's impossible to make a live action video of the escapement, since it's buried down between solid plates. Only chance is a shot straight down through the top, which doesn't give a helpful perspective.
(b) If we are talking about reshaping and adjusting removable deadbeat pallets, we're talking beyond my skill level. Never done it. Don't want to learn how by messing with somebody else's clock.
(c) I yam SO totally fed up with this narrative. I have a jillion hours tied up in two clocks that I can't keep running --this one and the Ansonia from another thread. They have eaten up my time, and I don't seem to be making any progress at all. If I can't turn a corner in the next few days, I'm going to give up any notion of making a profit from them, and see if LaBounty will be willing to accept the challenge. I desperately want to get them out the door, and out of my life, in running condition no matter what it costs me. Right now, I'm just spinning my wheels trying to follow up everbody's suggestions and advice...without progress. Pardon me for whining, gang, but I've just about had it. There are other clocks waiting for months to get my attention, and I owe it to the owners to make some progress on them. There are more suggestions to follow up, more wheels to spin, but this will have to come to an end soon. (Growl, mumble..) :emoji_angry:
 

RJSoftware

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Well the quickness of the stopping points to escape wheel and/or anchor/palettes. But could also be the gear pushing ew. I doubt any gears lower because it would run for longer stretches after clearing a lower gear problem.

The next s couple of steps involve work. I

1. You have to test each pivot/arbor for true in the lathe. Each side. Understand also that some difficult to install gears get re-bent on the install. It happens. The high speed test reveals bent arbor pivots as blur. Holding a straight edge to mainspring barrels helps.

2. Depthing check. When doing bushing work it is common to go too deep on pinion to wheel depth. When you do the high speed test the escape wheel shouls (excuse expression) haul a**. When its not right, as in a mesh too tight, the free wheeling high speed test, the movement whirls allong but not at that frightening speed. The ew should rumble like a rae car, not spin allong like a horse and buggy show (,english lady gently cracking light whip.. go dear horsey go).

But you cant just open the bushing on the side that gives the pinion more space. Close the bushing hole a good bit first by punching round nose in center, then open with broach pushing sideways with fingers so to walk the cutting in the favored direction. If you just open the side needed and not close other then nothing prevents it from drifting back.

Shoot for pinion depth of 80%. This really means a little more airspace than perceivable. So when you start to see the air gap of the wheels teeth in bottom of pinion, add a red heads hair more.

One of these days I need to make a clock depthing tool. The watch one I have is too small for clock gears.
 
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R. Croswell

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(bangster)
Pardon me for whining, gang, but I've just about had it. There are other clocks waiting for months to get my attention, and I owe it to the owners to make some progress on them. There are more suggestions to follow up, more wheels to spin, but this will have to come to an end soon. (Growl, mumble..)
Well if you are expecting failure you will certainly not be disappointed. First have confidence in what you have already done and the tests and observations that you have already made. This is not the time to be talking about re-depthing wheels and pinions. Unless I'm mistaken, you didn't do any bushing work and it is safe to assume that the original pivot locations are correct and that the clock did run OK at one time. You have checked the going train and found that everything is free and turning properly so for now have confidence in your evaluation and assume that it is OK. That leaves the escapement. You said...
If we are talking about reshaping and adjusting removable deadbeat pallets, we're talking beyond my skill level
That type of deadbeat escapement functions exactly like any other deadbeat escapement with a solid anchor. The biggest problem with the adjustable pallets is that someone may have already messed with them............but we don't know that so for the moment assume that they have not been messed with. I'm sure you know the basics of adjusting a deadbeat escapement. Forget all you know about recoil escapements, and forget about attempting to get maximum pendulum swing by setting the verge as close as possible without binding - that won't work here. If you can't get a video, it may be hard to see visually but you must confirm that the escape wheel teeth are landing on the dead face and not on the impulse face. Stand on your head, use mirrors or what ever but try to confirm this. One test is to very very slowly advance the crutch until a tooth drops. Advancing the crutch further should result in no movement of the EW. Repeat but this time after the tooth just drops move the crutch backward ever so slightly which should result in no movement of the EW. If the EW moves during either test the teeth are not on the dead face. If the teeth are not landing on the dead face the clock will not run or will run weakly. If the verge is set too deep there will be too much lock and there will not be enough impulse to drive the pendulum far enough to release a tooth and the clock will stop. Reduce the depth of the anchor to the point where the EW teeth just lands on the edge of the dead face but not on the impulse face and not on the line between the impulse and dead faces. Adjusting the depth of the anchor should be something you can do. There is no need discussing any other possibilities until you can confirm whether the escapement is working properly. Don't attempt to adjust or reshape the pallet nibs if that is beyond your skill level, but you can adjust the verge depth if necessary without causing any damage and you can confirm whether the escapement is or is not functioning properly. That I believe is your next step. If that does not yield success, then we look at one more thing....... or you farm the job out to become someone else's headache.

Good luck.

RC
 

bangster

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I am farming it out to Dick Feldman, who has graciously offered to intercede with the Devil. We'll see what he discovers.
 

tracerjack

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This tale of woe has gotten quite interesting. Please keep us posted as to how it eventually turns out.
 

bruce linde

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bangster

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'Cept they don't have any for sale.

Meanwhile, both the Evil Vienna and the wretched Ansonia with the Brocot escapement are off to Dick Feldman, to see what he can discover.

And with them out of the house, it'll take me a while to get back into the rhythm of repairing clocks, instead of sitting day after day and beating my head against those wicked sunsabidges.

I think I'll take some Johnnie Walker and watch TV for a while.
 
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R. Croswell

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'Cept they don't have any for sale.

Meanwhile, both the Evil Vienna and the wretched Ansonia with the Brocot escapement are off to Dick Feldman, to see what he can discover.
There are usually a variety of those borescopes on eBay. Be sure to get one with a focal length appropriate for what you want to see. Caution: the one I purchased directed me to an unsafe website to download software. I found that the camera softwear already on my PC worked just fine.

We should all pray Dick! I hope you will let us all know what Dick finds to be the problem.

RC
 

Dave T

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Been away for a while. And looking for an up date on the "evil Vienna" Any progress?
 

bangster

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It's, currently in the hands of Dick Feldman. We'll see what he discovers.
 
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manfromblan

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Just finished one with similar problem. Movement was rough with some bad repairs. Even though it ran the swing & impulse was weak. Went through the time train again to make sure all was ok. Anyway the problem was that the pallets in the verge had been adjusted incorrectly. After the pallets were adjusted correctly the movement runs strong with good impulse & no stoppages. The escapement eccentric had also been adjusted & was chewed up along with the screws holding the pallets.
 

Carl Bergquist

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I have been following this thread and I am becoming frustrated. I have a few Viennas and have been this route. I'm a rookie but I have not seen the tension between the minute hand and the washer behind the minute tube discussed. My clock would run up a storm with the minute hand off, but put the tapered pin in to hold the minute hand in place and not slipping and it would grind to a halt in a few minutes. I know some of these clocks don't have the little diamond shaped tension spring but I find that you need to be very careful with the pressure on the tapered pin holding the minute hand in place. Sorry if this has been discussed earlier or maybe this movement does not use this method of hand attachment.
 

bruce linde

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i try to polish the backs of hour cannons that might rub against the front plate, and the front edges of same that might hit the backs of the minute hands... which i also make sure are smooth and polished. i've also been known to shorten the height of an hour cannon ever-so-slightly (where do-able). it's important to look carefully at what happens when you insert a tapered pin, to make sure nothing is going to rub any more than it ought to.
 

RJSoftware

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Yes, exactly. Often on American cukoo clocks, similar situation, the problem is resolved easily by slightly grinding the hour cannon's top edge, thus making the cannon tube length just a hair bit shorter. What this does is prevent the back of the minute hand from rubbing on the hour cannon tube. On the cukoo example the minute hand arbor has a square shank section. The depth of how far the minute hand is pushed/held down is determined by raised edge on minute hand arbor. That level sinks after years as back plate bushing and pivot wear. Thus the back of the minute hand binds into the top edge of the hour cannon. The clutch/friction washer pushes them together. Removing a small microscopic amount of the cannon tube top edge with a stone works.
 

bangster

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The current status of the Evil Vienna. Dick Feldman worked his magic on it and got it to run reliably for him. Shipped it back to me, and I can't get it to run for more than 20 minutes. Go figure. I been here before, alas. All I can do is continue to do stuff until something works. Light a candle for me. :(:mad::confused:
 

bruce linde

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o_O
The current status of the Evil Vienna. Dick Feldman worked his magic on it and got it to run reliably for him. Shipped it back to me, and I can't get it to run for more than 20 minutes. Go figure. I been here before, alas. All I can do is continue to do stuff until something works. Light a candle for me. :(:mad::confused:
pls remove hands and dial, and then replace hands and upload some video of it running... and stopping.

pleas ealso verify that the wall it’s hanging on is truly perpendicular to the floor, and that the suspension spring is hanging straight... and that it’s in beat... and that the pendulum isn’t hitting anything or scraping... and that the pendulum swings true... and that the clock is hanging parallel to the wall it’s hanging on... and that the crutch slot is neither too sloppy or too tight.

also... when he shipped it back to you... how was it packed? and... have you tried running the movement on a test stand, i.e., not in the case? would love to see video of that, as well.

whatever it is, it is something... and we will find it. :)
 

bangster

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I have never put it in the case. It is sitting on a test stand, in view of everbody. No hands or stuff. Just Mr. Movement. Dick is an expert at packing; no fault there. If anything has "happened to it" or "been done to it, it's on my watch, not his. And I'm purty good at unwrapping
a movement without mucking it up. Cain't think of what may have happened to it or been done to it since it left Dick's hands. But I still cain't get it to run more than 20 minutes. As soon as I make any progress, I will jump back in here and report it.
o_O
 

bruce linde

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i was thinking maybe the suspension spring wasn't hanging true, pendulum hitting back of case, etc.

perhaps we'll need to organize an outing... rent a bus and get everyone to come over and look at it with you.... or, you could post video. :cool:
 

R. Croswell

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The current status of the Evil Vienna. Dick Feldman worked his magic on it and got it to run reliably for him. Shipped it back to me, and I can't get it to run for more than 20 minutes. Go figure. I been here before, alas. All I can do is continue to do stuff until something works. Light a candle for me. :(:mad::confused:
Bangs, take a step back and avoid doing "stuff" before you identify the problem or you could end up making it worse. I feel confident that Dick fixed everything that was broken, so you should not need to "fix" anything unless you broke something setting it up. I would suggest that you give Dick a call and talk through the problem. Other than yourself, he is the only one who has seen this clock up close and personal.

When you sent the clock to Dick did you include the same weights and pendulum that you are now using? You need to look for what is different on your test rack now compared to Dick's test rack when he had it running. Can we see pictures of your current setup? Any chance that something about your test rack is contacting the ends of pivots at the back plate?

Don't give up. The movement is probably not the problem - has to be something with the setup is different.

RC
 

RJSoftware

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One sneaky culprit resulting in intermittent error is end play.

The high speed test is good for revealing the evil.

High speed test, remove anchor/palettes, oil all bushings, wind fully, let spin.

On the first spin listen for pops, pings, etc. sounds. Should be a smooth whirr sound, but old movement has their flaws. In particular listen for the repeated sound and identify it with which gears revolution matches. Indicates location of troubled mesh from things like bad tooth to bent arbor/pivot.

To get an idea of end play trouble, while movement is spinning freely held in hand, flip movement in different orientations ( top plate up/down, etc.) to see if any hesitation from gears floating towards top/bottom plates. The idea here is to establish if any pivot shoulders are tapered and drifting into a bind. This also can reveal gears with too much end play. A gear that floats too near edge can result in binding mesh.

The next trick with High speed test for end play while spinning is to gently squeeze top a bottom plates between post counting on flex of plates to shrink end play space. This test can sometimes locate a gear that is prone to stop because it severely lacks end play or tapered pivot.

You can reach in with blade a test by scooting gears individually from side to side in different combinations. Then High speed test.

The high speed test is good for lower gear distortions as well. Part of the problem with Low speed test (couple clicks of power, mark where stops, look for repeated pattern) is it fails on bent pivot/arbors on low end gears. Why it fails is because things like typical bent arbor (mainspring breaks, shochwave bends arbor etc.) is the bend can be ever so slight, undetectable to the eye. As that gear turns the mesh binds in slowly stronger progress. Intermittent by failing sometimes or not. Plus, who has the time to repeat low speed test over and over till main wheel makes a few revolutions.

The High speed test resolves this by listening closely. Matching the pulse to the culprit gear.
 
Last edited:

R. Croswell

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One sneaky culprit resulting in intermittent error is end play.

The high speed test is good for revealing the evil.

High speed test, remove anchor/palettes, oil all bushings, wind fully, let spin.

On the first spin listen for pops, pings, etc. sounds. Should be a smooth whirr sound, but old movement has their flaws. In particular listen for the repeated sound and identify it with which gears revolution matches. Indicates location of troubled mesh from things like bad tooth to bent arbor/pivot.

To get an idea of end play trouble, while movement is spinning freely held in hand, flip movement in different orientations ( top plate up/down, etc.) to see if any hesitation from gears floating towards top/bottom plates. The idea here is to establish if any pivot shoulders are tapered and drifting into a bind. This also can reveal gears with too much end play. A gear that floats too near edge can result in binding mesh.

The next trick with High speed test for end play while spinning is to gently squeeze top a bottom plates between post counting on flex of plates to shrink end play space. This test can sometimes locate a gear that is prone to stop because it severely lacks end play or tapered pivot.

You can reach in with blade a test by scooting gears individually from side to side in different combinations. Then High speed test.

The high speed test is good for lower gear distortions as well. Part of the problem with Low speed test (couple clicks of power, mark where stops, look for repeated pattern) is it fails on bent pivot/arbors on low end gears. Why it fails is because things like typical bent arbor (mainspring breaks, shochwave bends arbor etc.) is the bend can be ever so slight, undetectable to the eye. As that gear turns the mesh binds in slowly stronger progress. Intermittent by failing sometimes or not. Plus, who has the time to repeat low speed test over and over till main wheel makes a few revolutions.

The High speed test resolves this by listening closely. Matching the pulse to the culprit gear.
The problem I have with your suggestion is that Dick serviced this clock and made everything well and had the clock running OK.

RC
 

RJSoftware

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Apr 15, 2005
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The problem I have with your suggestion is that Dick serviced this clock and made everything well and had the clock running OK.

RC
Intermittent can fool the best of us.
 

leeinv66

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If you only sent the movement to Dick, he must have used a different pendulum and suspension set up to the one you are using bang. Maybe it's not the movement, but your pendulum set up? Just a thought.
 
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