Eureka Eureka Clock

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by janekp, Nov 19, 2015.

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  1. janekp

    janekp Registered User

    May 21, 2011
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    #1 janekp, Nov 19, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2015
    I have not found anywhere "Post your Eureka Clock Here" therefore I intercede here some pics of my last purchase.
    Eureka Clock two ball bearings ,enamelled shield 1,5V.mising glas dome,running.SN 2501 -1907 ?
    SN 2501. IMG_3191.jpg IMG_3193.jpg IMG_3184.jpg IMG_3194.jpg IMG_3195.jpg IMG_3197.jpg IMG_3209.jpg IMG_3205.jpg IMG_3201.jpg IMG_3210.jpg

    IMG_3184.jpg IMG_3191.jpg IMG_3193.jpg IMG_3194.jpg IMG_3195.jpg IMG_3197.jpg IMG_3201.jpg IMG_3205.jpg IMG_3209.jpg IMG_3210.jpg
     
    etmb61 and Dave T like this.
  2. agwat1111

    agwat1111 Registered User

    Aug 6, 2015
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    Fantastic clock! A Eureka is on my Bucket List for sure! I know nothing of these clocks, what is meant by "enameled shield"?

    Regards,
    Andrew
     
  3. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
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    Dec 8, 2011
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    You and me both, brother!
     
  4. janekp

    janekp Registered User

    May 21, 2011
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    I meant cream colored dial .
     
  5. James McDermaid

    James McDermaid Registered User
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    Apr 29, 2011
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    Glad to see some chatter here for Eureka Clocks. I bought one of these in a four-Glass case earlier this year.

    It was gaining about 20 minutes per day and running on 3 volts when I got it.

    I'm still running it on 3 volts but I plan to work it over and get it to 1.5 volt operation.

    It is keeping decent time at the moment but sometimes wanders off which I believe to relate to humidity. When it is running accurate it is better than most of my Pendulum clocks.

    The balance wheel should make a full 360 degree rotation when the clock is properly cleaned and adjusted.

    There are only a couple of parts readily available which is the contact Pin and contact flag from TimeSavers as a set, and the glass bearing ends from Carlton Clocks.

    As #6 Dry-cell batteries are now extinct, Carlton Clocks UK, sells a replica version that provides an adjustable voltage up to 3 volts. It looks exactly like a #6 (or Flag Cell, UK) I found some picture files and printed an antique label for mine. This battery contains four "C" cells and a regulator circuit allowing precise voltage control. The original #6 cells had a very constant voltage output and supposedly ran the Eureka for up to 3 years.

    A gentleman by the name of Peter Smith in the UK is an expert on Eureka and he had a company name of Horologix. He has stepped back from the restoration business but left his web materials up and if you search Horologix you will fine a ton of knowledge. Many histories of Eureka,s he restored. He provided me an email of his adjustment tecniques and I would want his permission before I post that publicly.

    There is another gentleman in Australia who is gearing up to reproduce the battery clamp and the knurled nuts that keep it in.

    I enjoyed your pictures BTW

    I find this clock to be quite unique and I have mine right in front of me on my desk so I can marvel at it.

    Jim
     
  6. janekp

    janekp Registered User

    May 21, 2011
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    Thank you very much Jim for tips.
    I know these website-Horologix
    Mine is the voltage supply 1,5 V,about 5 minutes per day.
    I my clock the balance wheel should make a 260-265 degree rotation !!!.

    It is difficult to keeping decent time because missing glas dome and have large variations in temperature in the apartment.
    This is my first Eureka clock and I hope not the last:)
     
  7. itspcb

    itspcb Registered User
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  8. James McDermaid

    James McDermaid Registered User
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    Apr 29, 2011
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    I do notice that Carlton Clocks has more parts than last time i looked in.

    I wondered how the collectors take the Alan Shenton book for accuracy. He claims the bi-metal balance is for show and no temperature compensation. I find it is actually bi-metallic (Brass steel) and properly made. My house maintains fairly constant temperature.

    I had no trouble getting 360 degrees and I am actually getting 4 - 5 more than 360.

    I expect counter EMF has some effect at the moment the contacts open and I can see the value of getting it down to 1.5 volts.

    Jim
     
  9. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
    Staff Member NAWCC Star Fellow NAWCC Life Member

    Sep 7, 2000
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    janekp, thanks for posting your Eureka clock here. Actually there is a set of Eureka threads in this forum that can be found by clicking on the "Eureka" prefix name found at the beginning of any thread title that is related to the Eureka clock. It looks like this:

    Eureka: Eureka Clock

    I have highlighted the "Eureka:" prefix in blue so you can see exactly what I am describing. I have added the Eureka prefix to this thread. I do need to point out that when you are creating a new thread you can select the prefix from the header menu when you are typing in the thread title.

    When you click on this prefix, it will create a kind of mini-forum that contains only Eureka clock related threads. That allows you to go through everything there is about Eureka in the Electrical Horology main forum without needing to hunt for other threads.

    With regard to your clock it is a model No. 1 with the short movement and round dome, brass base. Regarding when it was made, that is a very difficult thing to do. My data, as well as information found in Alan Shenton's book and in contemporary trade journals show that commercial production of the movements started about mid-1908 and was completed by mid-1910. It is evident from dated presentation inscriptions that both the short and tall movement versions were produced in parallel, and also from the fact that exhibition examples of both types were presented to the public in late 1908 and during 1909-1910. We also know that once the movements were made they were kept in inventory and later installed in cases, some as late as 1913 only a few months before the company went out of business in 1914. Only one case design is known to have been made in a single run, being the No. 14 Cromwell English Lantern Clock model. To date, all of these that have been documented fall between serial numbers 2124 and 2247 inclusive, with no other models found within this series. This indicates that perhaps 150 of these were made in total.

    Replacement domes are not easily found and they are expensive as well since they are not a standard size. However, you can improvise using a standard dome. For example, you can use a 10 inch x 12 inch glass dome on a separate wooden base, these are about 1/3 the cost of a hand blown dome of the correct size. Just set your clock on the base and cover the whole clock with the dome.

    The battery voltage should be 1.5 V. Running on 3 V will burn the balance contact pin and contact flag even with a diode installed, although it doesn't appear to harm the coil winding. Jim commented that these clocks should make 360 degrees rotation on 1.5 V, and as I recall that is what Alan Shenton reported. My experience is that the best I have achieved is about 290 degrees, with the more usual performance being between 220 and 270 degrees. That is with having serviced more than 60 of these over the past 20 years. Using 3 V will give 310 to 380 degrees rotation, however I also find that regulation of the clock with the higher rotation is more difficult as it will tend to run fast and the balance spring may not have enough length to slow it down to time.

    When servicing these look in particular at balance pivot condition. Even the slightest irregular wear at that point will cause irregular regulation and can reduce rotation significantly. Also be sure that the motion works advance mechanism is completely free to oscillate on the balance wheel cam and there is no groove on the cam. Make absolutely sure the coils of the balance spring (some call it the "hairspring") do NOT touch each other at any point of rotation, if they do the clock will run fast and also can be irregular. The condition of the balance contact pin and insulator as well as the contact flag must also be without any significant wear or erosion.

    One last thing: Jim, it will be appreciated if you could post photos of your 4-glass model here for documentation purposes. We will look forward to seeing the photos.
     
  10. janekp

    janekp Registered User

    May 21, 2011
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    Thank you very much for a very comprehensive answer Mr Hubby.
    I'm glad you slowly I am able to be set
    my first Eureka clock.
    I have some glas dome at home so I'll try something fit.
    I would rather keep the original brass base.
     
  11. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    You definitely need to keep the original base. My suggestion was to find a dome large enough to fit over the entire clock including the brass base. I believe that one that is 10 inches diameter by 12 inches tall, with its own turned wood base would be large enough to hold the complete clock. Good luck with finding something appropriate.
     
  12. James McDermaid

    James McDermaid Registered User
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    Apr 29, 2011
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    Eureka-1.jpg This is my Eureka.
    The case is gilt bronze with four beveled glass panels and a solid panel top and is very nicely made.

    The front door swings opened and has a latch.

    The top part (glass and all) is secured to the base with screws from underneath.


    The base accommodates a #6 dry cell, the posts are cast into the base with threaded inserts for the nuts that retain the battery clamp.

    The movement is the short version s/n is 3284, three ball.

    I don't know if this has been re-cased but it appears to be made for this clock movement. I am aware this is not in the catalog but I'm also aware there are variants. I actually like the look of the short movement up high in the case and a good view of all moving parts.

    When I first got the clock it ran 20 minutes per day fast. I adjusted the balance spring, re-positioned the Colette of the balance spring so at rest the contact pin sits in the center of the contact flag.

    It now keeps decent time and is running on 3 volts. The balance rotates about 365 degrees.

    The movement is very clean condition and doesn't appear to have ever been victimized by the neighborhood clock boy.

    I will soon take this apart and clean it and work toward good timekeeping on 1.5 volts.

    Jim Mc
     
  13. sdbtickalot

    sdbtickalot New Member

    Apr 1, 2010
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    I was excited to read the information regarding the serial numbers for the Cromwell Eureka as I have both 2124 and 2125 serial numbers in my private collection.

    Were was this serial number info taken from?

    I have 2 other Cromwell Eurekas with later numbers and are slightly different. The earlier numbers have the movements mounted to the dial while the later numbers are base mounted.
     
  14. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    Welcome to the NAWCC Message Board, and thanks for your message information. My response is somewhat tardy, but I think will answer your questions.

    The serial number information is from my personal database for Eureka clocks that now contains over 300 documented examples. Within that, I presently have 15 Cromwell clocks documented, and at one point I owned serial number 2125 that is now in your collection. Also, since I posted my info in November 2015 I have added one clock with a higher serial number than previously documented, being SN 2258 which reinforces my projection that about 150 of these were made in total. Your observation about the mounting of the movements is what I have also found, with front-mounted models from SN 2124 and base mounted models from SN 2148 and higher per my existing data.
     
  15. doby11

    doby11 Registered User
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    Apr 6, 2019
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    68C57F58-87A7-49CB-A918-2D2AA489D1B3.jpeg E3C71C87-89BF-445E-9948-EE1FA97C34F0.jpeg 274104F6-775D-48FD-B413-91849D792DDE.jpeg 3A9D422E-CEF8-41B4-A225-88EE9D7FE922.jpeg Hello. I just purchased my first Eureka clock and I was wondering if anyone could give me an approximate idea when it was made. It appears to be original. It doesn’t look like a marriage. It has the original door key and a regulating key. I removed the dial to look for a serial number but can’t find one on the front or back. The dial is certainly old and flaking. It’s running and keeping time on a 1.5 volt D cell. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. A0E645AB-1EC2-44ED-A2FD-A28CF7B44003.jpeg
     

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