Eureka Eureka Clock Co., London

wow

NAWCC Member
Jun 24, 2008
5,459
620
113
76
Pineville, La. (central La.)
Country
Region
I got this with several more English clocks yesterday. I have never seen one. Please tell me what you know about it. Self winding? Battery powered?
Thanks, Will

946BA0EA-8A92-465D-8EFF-B7C16DD4BABB.jpeg 7E2EA87E-8743-45FE-A12E-1978730FA56C.jpeg 57288D2F-7698-4EFA-BB18-81DB56FAF023.jpeg DE741636-C4A2-43FC-AC48-1988A7335CF2.jpeg B92CAB88-C616-4596-AD66-3F387E411F14.jpeg
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jmeechie

Jmeechie

NAWCC Member
Dec 8, 2010
422
104
43
Country
Region
Nice! I’ll take it off your hands if you don’t want it! :D
There more electrically driven. They’ll run on 1.5 volt (D cell) battery. Once you get them sorted they’re fascinating to watch.
 

Jmeechie

NAWCC Member
Dec 8, 2010
422
104
43
Country
Region
The other connects to the frame as I recall. Check for no continuity between the silver post and frame. When you gently swing the wheel you should see burps of continuity on a meter with no battery installed.
 

James McDermaid

Registered User
Apr 29, 2011
147
11
18
Not sure of the exact model you have there,

Desirable clock.

Originally ran on a 1.5 volt #6 dry cell or Flag cell for the UK.

A "D" cell should run it for quite a while.

A pin on the wheel engages a metal contact on the left side of the movement. The contact is one battery connection and the frame the other.

The contact engages the pin on one direction and engages an insulated side of the pin on the reverse.

The pin will usually engage the contact when the clock is stopped going in one direction.

Yours is what is called the long movement, three ball.

Be careful parts are very scarce.

Jim
 

wow

NAWCC Member
Jun 24, 2008
5,459
620
113
76
Pineville, La. (central La.)
Country
Region
Not sure of the exact model you have there,

Desirable clock.

Originally ran on a 1.5 volt #6 dry cell or Flag cell for the UK.

A "D" cell should run it for quite a while.

A pin on the wheel engages a metal contact on the left side of the movement. The contact is one battery connection and the frame the other.

The contact engages the pin on one direction and engages an insulated side of the pin on the reverse.

The pin will usually engage the contact when the clock is stopped going in one direction.

Yours is what is called the long movement, three ball.

Be careful parts are very scarce.

Jim
Thanks, Jim. This will definitely be a learning experience for me. Your explanation is just what I need to hopefully get it going. Evidently it had a glass dome or cover of some kind. Any idea what it was?
 

James McDermaid

Registered User
Apr 29, 2011
147
11
18
There is a book called "The Eureka Clock" by Dr F.G. Alan Shenton that I believe is long out of print but you can try Amazon.

There are pictures of the clock models that were in their catalog but it is believed there were other case styles made in small quantities.

They were patented around 1906 and manufactured around 1910 to 1914. The serial numbers don't track to any kind of exact year of manufacture.

They were all made in the UK and then some lookalikes came from other countries.

Most proper radicalized clock collectors desire to own a Eureka.

I don't completely agree with the book but the guy is a Dr.


Jim
 

Steve Murphy

Registered User
Jan 8, 2007
137
12
18
Sierra Madre, Calif.
Country
Region
There is a book called "The Eureka Clock" by Dr F.G. Alan Shenton that I believe is long out of print but you can try Amazon.

There are pictures of the clock models that were in their catalog but it is believed there were other case styles made in small quantities.

They were patented around 1906 and manufactured around 1910 to 1914. The serial numbers don't track to any kind of exact year of manufacture.

They were all made in the UK and then some lookalikes came from other countries.

Most proper radicalized clock collectors desire to own a Eureka.

I don't completely agree with the book but the guy is a Dr.


Jim
 

wow

NAWCC Member
Jun 24, 2008
5,459
620
113
76
Pineville, La. (central La.)
Country
Region
There is a book called "The Eureka Clock" by Dr F.G. Alan Shenton that I believe is long out of print but you can try Amazon.

There are pictures of the clock models that were in their catalog but it is believed there were other case styles made in small quantities.

They were patented around 1906 and manufactured around 1910 to 1914. The serial numbers don't track to any kind of exact year of manufacture.

They were all made in the UK and then some lookalikes came from other countries.

Most proper radicalized clock collectors desire to own a Eureka.

I don't completely agree with the book but the guy is a Dr.


Jim
James, the book is not available anymore. Do you have a copy?
 

wow

NAWCC Member
Jun 24, 2008
5,459
620
113
76
Pineville, La. (central La.)
Country
Region
All the wheels were gummed up and would not turn. I removed them and cleaned them and put it back together. Still will not run. Any ideas?
 

PatH

NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Member
Dec 5, 2014
2,283
1,742
113
Texas
Country
Region
wow it looks like there are several books on the Eureka Clock available to members from the NAWCC library, including a couple that look like they might discuss repairs/adjustments.
 

wow

NAWCC Member
Jun 24, 2008
5,459
620
113
76
Pineville, La. (central La.)
Country
Region
wow it looks like there are several books on the Eureka Clock available to members from the NAWCC library, including a couple that look like they might discuss repairs/adjustments.
Thank jyou, Pat. I will definitely look at those books.
Will
 

wow

NAWCC Member
Jun 24, 2008
5,459
620
113
76
Pineville, La. (central La.)
Country
Region
wow it looks like there are several books on the Eureka Clock available to members from the NAWCC library, including a couple that look like they might discuss repairs/adjustments.
I have the books ordered from the NAWCC library. I have not gotten it going yet. Maybe the books will help. I do not understand the contact wire. I think mine is not insulated on one side. How is it insulated and which side is insulated:???:
 

James McDermaid

Registered User
Apr 29, 2011
147
11
18
The contact pin and flag contact were available from Tine Savers, USA and Carlton Clocks UK.

It require some special tooling to make these parts so I chose to buy a set a while back, although the clock has the original as far as I know.

The flag contact is at an angle so the pin makes contact going in one direction and the insulated side passes with the wheel turning the other.

I hear a subtle clunk sound when the coil is energized and a subtle click when it turns the other way.

Jim
 

wow

NAWCC Member
Jun 24, 2008
5,459
620
113
76
Pineville, La. (central La.)
Country
Region
The contact pin and flag contact were available from Tine Savers, USA and Carlton Clocks UK.

It require some special tooling to make these parts so I chose to buy a set a while back, although the clock has the original as far as I know.

The flag contact is at an angle so the pin makes contact going in one direction and the insulated side passes with the wheel turning the other.

I hear a subtle clunk sound when the coil is energized and a subtle click when it turns the other way.

Jim
The contact pin and flag contact were available from Tine Savers, USA and Carlton Clocks UK.

It require some special tooling to make these parts so I chose to buy a set a while back, although the clock has the original as far as I know.

The flag contact is at an angle so the pin makes contact going in one direction and the insulated side passes with the wheel turning the other.

I hear a subtle clunk sound when the coil is energized and a subtle click when it turns the other way.

Jim
I got the books in and have begun reading. First I found that the coil was not vertical when still so I adjusted the balance spring so it would be right. Still won’t run. I need to know about the pin that is insulated on one side. I read that I could use epoxy but which side needs to be insulated? Another question: I read about a “flag” contact that connects to the base on the lower left. Mine has a small springy wire that makes contact with the pin. No flag. :???:?
Any ideas?
 

John UK

Registered User
Mar 25, 2006
99
2
8
Picture of a (rather dirty!) contact and flag in situ. The 'pin' has a silver(?) conductive part on the side nearest the camera and an insulated side on the side away from the camera.
  1. As the photo is set up, the insulated side of the pin is resting against the flag.
  2. The pin passes down (balance wheel going anticlockwise viewed from the front) brushing the flag, but no conductive surfaces contact.
  3. On the return (balance wheel going clockwise viewed from the front), the pin passes behind the flag, so that the conductive side of the pin brushes the flag, allowing the current top flow.
I have sent you a P.M. with a short video clip.

IMG_2718.jpeg
 
Last edited:

James McDermaid

Registered User
Apr 29, 2011
147
11
18
A wire from the coil "small springy" is soft soldered to the backside of the contact pin on my clock. The other end of the coil winding is secured to the balance wheel core somehow.

The coil is an electromagnet when the contact pin touches the flag long enough to pull the end of the coil toward the steel bar at the bottom.

The springy wire is the copper wire winding on the coil and should be solidly soldered to the pin not springy contact.

The circuit is completed when the coil connects through the frame of the clock through the balance spring and ball bearings to one terminal of the battery. A wire from the other terminal of the battery goes to the contact flag which is insulated from the frame.

The contact pin is clamped in the balance such that it is insulated from the metal balance. The pin is so close to the pivot that it would be hard to mess up the poise of the balance. I would expetc the coil wire to be brittle and easy to break off at the coil.

My clock has a wire in a hole held by a set screw in a cross rod and the connection to the contact flag is directly behind the rod.
 

James McDermaid

Registered User
Apr 29, 2011
147
11
18
Since I'm adducted to these clocks . . . . There was a web site from Horologix which was Peter Smith in the UK.

They had a number of pdf files posted which showed very detailed pictures and descriptions of the restoration of Eureka clocks by serial number. (restored_eureka_404), would be one of many of these articles if they are still out on the web. They could be downloaded for further study. The articles were copyrighted so I would not post them without permission.

The coil should measure 20 ohms from the metal core or wheel to the loose end wire which should emerge from the windings at about the center and the loose end is soldered to the contact pin.

The contact pin and contact flag are made of silver, There is a little pin called a "bullet" that is anchored to the frame in a hole by a set screw. The wire that is connected to the flag contact at the bottom is soldered and referred to in one of these documents as the "positive" wire, so maybe battery polarity is important, at least Peter Smith thought so. In my clock the two wires pass down through a hole in the base and connect to the battery under the base.

If I stop my clock it comes to rest with the contact pin in contact with the flag contact while turning anti-clockwise it will stay stopped but if I catch it turning clockwise as soon as the pin makes contact it starts going again all by its self.

As Peter Smith appeared to be in business restoring these he had fabricated tooling to make the contact flag and pin which is where the parts came from. He also published detailed drawings of these parts. They have to be exact as the timing and position of the contact determines the duration of current flow through the coil and if you will get full rotation on 1.5 volts.

Jim
 

wow

NAWCC Member
Jun 24, 2008
5,459
620
113
76
Pineville, La. (central La.)
Country
Region
Wow, what great information, Jim and John. I have been extremely busy preparing a house for sale the last few weeks and have had little time in the shop. I’ll get back to it soon and post updates. Thanks, guys.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
168,290
Messages
1,467,795
Members
48,220
Latest member
Aikenhudson
Encyclopedia Pages
1,060
Total wiki contributions
2,955
Last update
-