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English Lantern Clocks

Frank Menez

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Having lived in England for several years and collecting lantern clocks a discussion of the various types might be useful. The conversion from balance escapement, to crown wheel escapement, to anchor escapement can be seen on the plates of the clocks. Many lanterns were also converted to double fusee movements. Manny of these clocks went directly from balance wheel to long pendulum anchor escapement.

FM

[This message was edited by Frank Menez on September 07, 2003 at 13:10.]

[This message was edited by Frank Menez on September 07, 2003 at 13:11.]
 

Ralph

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Hi Frank,

Many of the fusee Lantern clocks were original as well. Of course they were 19th century clocks and not 17th & 18th century clocks.

Lantern clocks were still being put together in the 1960's, maybe later. I'll never forget being at a prominent English clock collector's workshop. He opened a drawer and it was full of new/old castings of essentially every part needed to put together a clock....since then I would do my homework and examine closely any lantern clock under consideration..

There are many fakes.

...and then for reading, the much sought after George White, Lantern Clocks book is the reference.

Cheers, Ralph
 

Nick Ryan

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Hi Ralph & everyone else, also the new 'Lantern Clocks & Their makers' by Brian Loomes is available for Lantern Clock enthusiasts, I have both and can say that Brian's book is as good as George White's and possible more accurate and up to date. English 30 hour clocks also contains good information on lanterns, it is by Darken & Hooper & is readily available.

Nick
 

jmclaugh

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English lantern clocks originated around 1620 and were all weight driven with one weight for each train with the going and striking trains being mounted back to back. They originally had crown wheel/verge escapements with a balance wheel controller. With the introduction of the pendulum into England around 1660 a bob pendulum began to used instead of a balance wheel controller, the Huygens endless winding system with a single weight was introduced and anchor escapements and long pendulums were subsequently used. Some clocks continued to be made using the original form of escapement up until the end of the 17th C but sadly very few survive with their original escapement due to being converted to use a pendulum. It has become fashionable where possible to convert some of them back to use the original form of escapement.

Spring driven lantern clocks are all reproductions or conversions of an original lantern clock.
 
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Chris Radano

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I have always been a Brian Loomes reader. Personally I find his writing style unpretentious, easy to understand, and easy for me to retain the information he presents. The new book Nick mentioned above is a must have for anyone interested in lantern clocks. A couple clocks that have been or still are here are credited by Loomes in his "lantern clock makers" glossary in the back of the above book (I'm rather proud of that as a collector of less than 10 years).

The different styles of English 30 hour clocks is the most interesting aspect of lantern clocks to me. Dating lantern clocks from dial engraving styles, lantern clocks transitioning to square dial lanterns + hook and spike clocks, hooded clocks, etc. I find these clocks much more interesting than longcase clocks, but that's just me. That's what gets the juices flowing for me.
 

Chris Radano

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P.S. I just realized when this thread was started, in 2003. Of course Loomes' new book of "Lantern Clocks and their Makers" did not yet exist.
 

Steven Thornberry

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Chris Radano;760079 said:
P.S. I just realized when this thread was started, in 2003. Of course Loomes' new book of "Lantern Clocks and their Makers" did not yet exist.
There is a certain convenience (or what have you) to noticing the last date in a thread and starting a new thread to avoid confusion. Resurrecting threads that are quite old and dormant (in this case, nearly 10 years old) is not very useful. This will not be allowed in the future in this forum.
 

Nick Ryan

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Steven it would be good if old threads were locked after a certain period of time. Regards, Nick