Help Embee tall case clock with no weights

pellikan

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May 4, 2021
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Hi,

My friend purchased a tall case clock from a local charity at auction and he gave it to me. The biggest issue I'm having with it is that it didn't have any weights. I'm hoping someone here can guide me to how heavy the weights should be for this clock. I think I can probably construct some weights from wood I turn and hollow on a lathe and fill with lead shot. Or, conversely, buy something off the shelf. I just need the weight. So, if you've got one of these clocks can you please weigh the weights? Or, maybe you've got an old reference book somewhere?
I appreciate any help, thank you.

The movement is for 2 weights and is labeled Embee, 1 Million, 318739, P. 116. clock.jpg 20210427_161449.jpg 20210503_193515.jpg 20210427_161452.jpg
 
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Dick Feldman

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There is a way to determine what weight will run a clock movement.
You will need a scale, like fishermen use.
Rig up the top of the scale to the drive chain, cable or whatever.
Fasten the bottom of the scale to something stable (like a wire going to the bottom of the case or to a big stack of bricks.
Wind the clock till the scale is supplying the force.
Start the clock and when the clock quits, whatever is shown on the fishing scale is the minimum amount of weight that will run the clock.
Add 25-40% to that value and you should be in the neighborhood for weight.
Best of luck,
Dick
 

bruce linde

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never needed more than 6lb weights with these german chain-driven movements, but that assumes full servicing.
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Pell,

Around 8# would be a good place to start.

Many of these type clocks required more weight on the strike side due to large numbers of hammers, or heavy gong/s, etc.

Unfortunately, there is no exact answer to your question. It depends on the condition of the movement.

A wood cased weight would probably have to be on the long side. The max diameter would be double the distance between the chains minus about 1/2". On the one I'm looking at, that would be 3". So, that should be doable but you may need to cast a solid weight/s.

Stay tuned, Willie
 

pellikan

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Awesome ideas and help folks. Keep 'em coming. I'm learning!

I'm still hoping someone has a similar clock or aforementioned reference book who can tell me what the manufacturer intended.
 

Willie X

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I've got similar clocks but that won't be the answer for your clock. DFs scale trick will directly answer your question.

Bruce said 6 and I said 8. So, if you don't have a spring scale, just go with anything between 6 and 8 pounds and see how she goes. Bricks, bolts, lead wheel weights, it matters not.

Willie X
 

JimmyOz

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Another way to find a workable weight is to use small free weights (the disks you see in a gym) I am sure you would know someone that has them, just thread a wire through them and through a few chain links and twist. The problem is that your movement is in a bad way, therefore it may not work even with over heavy weight. Try adding the weight and if you get too 10lb and it is not working then the movement needs fixed and then start with the weights again to find the right amount.
 

shutterbug

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I agree that the movement should be brought up to standard before you attempt to put weights on it. As is, it will require more weight to run than it should have.
 

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