Electric movement

TimeafterTime

NAWCC Member
Jun 29, 2016
117
2
18
Fort Wayne, IN
Country
Region
Hi folks,
I got this interesting clock in and the customer states that the clock runs fast. I plugged it in and yes it runs very fast. I'm looking to identify this movement so I can get a replacement. I can use your help on this matter. Thanks

20200810_002820.jpg 20200810_002828.jpg 20200810_002851.jpg
 

R. Croswell

Registered User
Apr 4, 2006
10,919
1,080
113
Trappe, Md.
www.greenfieldclockshop.com
Country
Region
Interesting problem and I'm surprised that no one has replied. Is there a label anywhere, perhaps on the back or bottom of the clock that says 60Hz or 50Hz? If the clock was made for an area that has 50Hz power and it is connected to a 60Hz. power line it will run fast. Perhaps you would be more likely to get a response in the electric horology section? I can't think of any other reason why an electric clock would run fast.

RC
 

shutterbug

Moderator
Staff member
NAWCC Member
Oct 19, 2005
46,149
1,764
113
North Carolina
Country
Region
I agree. I'll move this to electric horology for you too.
 

Uhralt

NAWCC Member
Sep 4, 2008
5,064
628
113
Country
Region
If the clock was made for 50 Hz current it would gain 12 minutes in an hour on 60 Hz. Is it that fast? Then it would also probably been made to run on 220 V, so there might be a power problem as well.

Uhralt
 

davefr

NAWCC Member
Nov 29, 2008
468
19
18
Oregon
www.telechronclock.com
Country
Region
There are three possible scenarios:
1. The hands are loose on their stem and/or hitting each other and creating the illusion that it's running fast. (very common)
2. The movement is badly worn and hands are slipping downward between 12 to 6 (not too common)
3. The motor is geared for an operating frequency lower then what the power grid is operating at. (not common but it does happen)

(It's impossible for a proper synchronous motor to run fast when matched to the frequency of the power grid.)
 

TimeafterTime

NAWCC Member
Jun 29, 2016
117
2
18
Fort Wayne, IN
Country
Region
Interesting problem and I'm surprised that no one has replied. Is there a label anywhere, perhaps on the back or bottom of the clock that says 60Hz or 50Hz? If the clock was made for an area that has 50Hz power and it is connected to a 60Hz. power line it will run fast. Perhaps you would be more likely to get a response in the electric horology section? I can't think of any other reason why an electric clock would run fast.

RC
I have attached another picture of the back plate.

20200813_003746.jpg
 

Molson3003

Registered User
Apr 14, 2020
56
15
8
41
Country
Region
Maybe my eyes have not woke yet. I can’t tell if that says 50 or 60.

If you can tell, see davefr’s post. He has laid out the possibilities

Chances are that is a 60, you are in a 60 cycle grid, so check for loose hands
 

Tim Orr

National Membership Chair
Director
NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Member
Sep 27, 2008
1,475
268
83
Boulder CO
Country
Region
Good afternoon, Time!

When you say "very fast," how fast is "very fast"? If it's exactly 12 minutes fast per hour of running, it might be that someone replaced the motor but kept the back plate. If it's anything other than 12 minutes fast per hour, I agree with (1) or (2) in davefr's posting.

Best regards!

Tim Orr
 

mxfrank

Registered User
Oct 27, 2011
163
9
18
United Clock Company of Brooklyn. I assume it's a novelty clock of some sort? It should be a 60 cycle synchronous motor. And it's not always easy to find a replacement, so I doubt someone swapped in a 50 cycle motor. The problem is probably elsewhere, and you should start by disassembling and cleaning.

United owned Sessions, which might be helpful if you need to find a motor.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
164,793
Messages
1,433,851
Members
85,803
Latest member
Chas99
Encyclopedia Pages
1,101
Total wiki contributions
2,863
Last edit
Rockford's early high grade movements by Greg Frauenhoff