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Early 400 day clock penulum

Weight Driven

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May 24, 2004
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Hi everyone. Just picked up this 400 day clock pendulum but am unsure what it might go to or the age. My guess is that it is early 20th century but that is just a guess. Also the spurs on the upper portions are a little unusual, well to my eye anyway. Any help would be great. Thanks.

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KurtinSA

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Nov 24, 2014
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Don't see that in the repair guide...I'm sure there's lots that didn't find its way into the guide. Any stampings on it anywhere, like on the underside of the bottom crossbar?

Kurt
 

John Hubby

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These pendulums were used by Konrad Mauch from their first production in late 1947 until about mid-1950. They had one model with matching curled finials on the pendiment. Also, all these clocks made from first production to about end 1950 have serial numbers that are stamped on the INSIDE of the movement plates so many go undetected but with the numbers I can date them fairly accurately.

Also for the history buffs, the first commercial fully adjustable 4-ball pendulum was patented by Jahresuhren-Fabrik in November 1909. They had a monopoly on this until November 1915, after which Kienzle introduced their design in December 1915 and Gustav Becker in January 1916. The next 4-Ball was by Kundo in 1923, then Wintermantel in 1924, then Schlenker & Posner in 1928 with their second version in 1934. Kundo added variations of their designs in 1930 and 1933.
 
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