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E Howard Watch Co Boston Railroad Watch - Help Requested

MrRoundel

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Welcome to the message board. Nice opening watch. But no, it's not a nickel keywind. It is a gilt-finished keywind E. Howard and Co. series IV. Generally, when a price book mentions nickel, they are referring to nickel plates. As I said, yours has gilt plates. It's a nice watch, as all early Howards are. Some series IV's have dials that are held by screws passing through the movement, as yours does.

Since the case looks like it's silverode/silveroid/nickel silver, it's not likely that it's an original case. Still, the case looks period correct to my eye. Others more expert in early Howards may see it differently.

It's great that it's running. Good for you. But as a word to the wise, it's best not to run it much if it hasn't been serviced in years, which would be no surprise. That said, it looks like all it will need is a "simple" clean and oiling and you'll be good to go for many years. Good luck.
 

musicguy

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Welcome to the NAWCC Forum

Great family watch



Rob
 

Kirbs1957

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Welcome to the message board. Nice opening watch. But no, it's not a nickel keywind. It is a gilt-finished keywind E. Howard and Co. series IV. Generally, when a price book mentions nickel, they are referring to nickel plates. As I said, yours has gilt plates. It's a nice watch, as all early Howards are. Some series IV's have dials that are held by screws passing through the movement, as yours does.

Since the case looks like it's silverode/silveroid/nickel silver, it's not likely that it's an original case. Still, the case looks period correct to my eye. Others more expert in early Howards may see it differently.

It's great that it's running. Good for you. But as a word to the wise, it's best not to run it much if it hasn't been serviced in years, which would be no surprise. That said, it looks like all it will need is a "simple" clean and oiling and you'll be good to go for many years. Good luck.
Thank you for this information
 

Clint Geller

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I inherited this key wound, model.
It is silver in color
I have figured it is from 1871
It runs
Is this the rare watch mentioned
NICKEL KW 1871
If you can help me identify if this is a rare watch or not I would appreciate it.


View attachment 736922 View attachment 736923 View attachment 736924
Congratulations on your early Howard Series IV/Model 1871. This watch model was introduced in the N Size (roughly a Lancashire Gauge 19 Size) at serial number 30,001, and it continued in production until movement serial number 49,999, which was completed in the 1880's. Without checking my copy of the factory records for an exact date, I'd estimate that your watch was completed around 1876 or so, right around the national centennial. Quite a few design changes transpired in this watch model during the more than ten years over which it was in production. As MrRoundel mentioned, the earlier examples like yours had dials two of whose feet were threaded and secured through the back of the movement by wine-tinted screws. The patent marking inscribed on the dial, February 4, 1868, refers to Howard's patent covering his steel safety barrel. That same patent also describes a stem winding and lever setting mechanism, but only Howard's G Size Ladies Model 1874 (Series VI) movements, and a very small number of "Prescott" model L Size Model 1869 (Series V) movements were lever set. Stem winding and nickel plates both were introduced somewhat after the Model 1871 entered production. The highest grade Model 1871/Series IV movements have both of these features in addition to a Reed's whipspring patent regulator, screwed down train jewel settings, and adjustment to isochronism, temperature and six positions. The level of adjustment is indicated in engraving at the base of the balance cock, except for unmarked movements like yours, which were adjusted only to isochronism. You can find more information about the various design attributes of your watch here.
 
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