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E. Howard Lubrication

sjaffe

Registered User
Dec 25, 2012
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Santa Rosa,CA
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OK, last question (for now), E. Howard roundtop lubrication. I want to keep the clock lubricated. Some of the bushings have oil holes in the top, so a drop of oil periodically applied there should take care of them. However, there are bushings in the front that have no oil hole. If this were a small clock, I would just turn it sideways and apply a drop of oil to the pivot. But it's not, so I can't. I can put a drop where the bushing and pivot meet, but I can't see how that would wick in to properly lubricate. I could remove each bushing, but that seems like too much work and I can't imagine that being the way to do it every several months. What's the secret how to do this?
Thanks,
Stan
 

gvasale

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Mar 30, 2005
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webster, Ma
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Most of the time I have an old tooth brush with which I cover the bristles with a piece of rag and wipe the outside of each pivot, and then do the inside of the plate as well. Then with any device you choose, add a drop of oil to the outside of the oil sink at the top and do the same where the arbor rubs inside the plates. I haven't seen a problem with "grundge" accumulation in these places as long as the oil hasen't turned to varnish. Th great wheels, the hammer lever and a couple of other bushings have holes on the top of them to fill with oil. FWIW, I do my tower clocks every 90 days. Grease on the pads of the great wheel (strike only has them) and the cam which sets of the striking located on the hour shaft.
 

Donn Haven Lathrop

Registered User
Jul 28, 2010
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0
"I can put a drop where the bushing and pivot meet, but I can't see how that would wick in to properly lubricate."

Simple. Capillary action. I use a hypodermic syringe filled with oil and a flashlight. Put the needle at the junction of the pivot and the bushing. Add oil. You can see the meniscus of oil with the flashlight. Personally, I don't like lubrication holes. They are dirt and grunge collectors.

Donn Haven Lathrop
 

gvasale

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Mar 30, 2005
1,194
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38
71
webster, Ma
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Here are two axles from a smaller clock. .030 shelf worn into one also severe taper. Oil channel gummed up & plugged preventing oil from reaching surface to lubricate.
 

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gvasale

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Mar 30, 2005
1,194
8
38
71
webster, Ma
Country
Region
Also an orientation issue. Oil hole on one where pulley frame was installed upside down. No effective way to fill reservoir.