drying box

EmmaR

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Jun 29, 2007
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interested to know what everyone uses for drying clock movements. I thought to make up a plywood box with a light globe to heat it, has anyone any thoughts on this?
*EMMA*
 

Scottie-TX

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Apr 6, 2004
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For many here perhaps - a rerun, but mine is a popcorn popper rescued from the dumpster, bypassed the on/off switch, and replaced the top section with a screen basket. There is a heater and very high volume blower that makes parts too hot to touch in less than two minutes.
 

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fixoclox

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Apr 4, 2007
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Hi Folks I made a dryer using a cardboard box a screen and an old flat hair dryer. Not the pistol type hair dryer. The fan in the dryer is the key dries real fast and even. When the box wears out I just replace it
 

fixoclox

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Apr 4, 2007
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Tony Compressed air is an alternitive. Be aware that there is water content in that air unless you are running a dryer or two. Also when you blow parts dry by compressed air you are creating condensation. Bill
 

Tony Ambruso

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Dec 2, 2005
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The air is very dry here, and I don't think you create any significant condensation in most environments, given the speed with which the water is blown free of the surface.

Also, you create a small amount of residue when heat drying, as opposed to blowing water off the surface, especially in those hard to reach places that are not normally removed for cleaning. You can get the residue of the naturally occurring elements and compounds in your water.

Having used several methods for drying clock parts, I found compressed air to be the best for me, as far as removal of all water and residue without damaging lacquer finishes.

It was the method we used at the School of Horology. We used heaters for the clock springs, but I do not use heat at all anymore.
 

dutch

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Jan 6, 2003
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When I first started clock repair I made a box for drying the parts, a complete waste of time. Now I just use a hair drying gun, it only takes a couple of minutes but I blow the excess water off with compressed air before drying.

After rinsing with water I always run the parts through a watch rinsing solution, I like the looks of it better and I feel it adds a bit of protection for the steel parts for rusting. Living near the ocean i fight a constant battle against rust.

Regards, Dutch
 

Mike Phelan

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Dec 17, 2003
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I gennerally use coffee or beer.

After the final rinse in IPA or similar, I go and make a cup of coffee, or get a glass of beer (that sort of IPA* is good ;) ) and drink it.

I then find that the movement is perfectly dry.

*India Pale Ale
 
S

Storer

Emma,
Years ago, I made a wood box, approx 18" by 12" by 12", cut a hole in the end, round, to be able to stick a hand held hair dryer in it. Then over one side of the box I put an old piece of carpet, this allows access and also holds the heat in. It has used up at least 10 dryers over the years.

RDS
 

R&A

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Oct 21, 2008
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Hey guys
I have been using the same bread box for 20 years.Took an old metal bread box and cut a hole in the top.Installed a pistal hair dryer and it will heat the parts so hot you can't pick them up.I used to heat my lunch in this thing.Some parts you won't want to heat up.Like plastic parts and hammer inserts.Other than that it drys the parts very well.And as for compressed air,no thanks to much moister.If you have ever shot a part across the room because it was to hard to hang on to,and then found that it was so damage that your need for clock repair skills kicked into full swing.Hey I stick with the bread box.
 

Scottie-TX

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Apr 6, 2004
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Too hot? Yeah. I'm on that deal. Finished removing the paint someone applied to the back of a Wiener bob. After washing, placed in my popcorn drier. If I'd left it in there a few more secs. I'd probably have two bobs. Melted th' sodder!
 

R&A

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Oct 21, 2008
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Oh my .Now thats hot.
 

eskmill

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Aug 24, 2000
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'Best homemade I've seen was of a "gutted" microwave oven.

The maker removed the transformer, klystron, condenser and much of the electrical apparatus except the electronic timer.

He installed a lady's hair dryer where the transformer, guts and all were located and connected it to the timer circuit with the safety switches in series so that it can't overheat.
 

Bogey

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Mar 25, 2005
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After trying a couple different suggestions over the past few years, I've settled on an air compressor to blow the excess water off the parts and then finish the job with a hand-held hair dryer. The compressor gets most of the moisture off so it doesn't take as much time with the dryer.
 

bangster

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Jan 1, 2005
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I used to use a regular air popcorn popper with a wire basket on top. Found a twin to Scottie's rig in a thrift store, and now I use that. After reading about his recent adventure, I may also use it for melting lead tire weights into slugs for pendulum bobs. :eek: :clap:

bangster
 

bchaps

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Dec 16, 2001
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Like several others, I sold my commercial drying cabinet after finding compressed air is much faster and eliminates any concerns of dried residue or burning the varnish.

All small parts and gears are contained in a L&R 3 3/4" commercial basket and the plates hung on a copper wire while suspended in the ultrasonic cleaner. When removed from the "wash" cycle", the plates and baskets are blown dry while held in a towel. Next stop is the rinse machine and then blown dry again. As Tony mentioned earlier, L&R rinse solution "skates" off the plates and parts. Based upon my experiences with a variety of methods, I found a "waterless" cleaning program with compressed air is the quickest way to get the cleaned parts back on the bench with no concerns of rusting.
 

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