Double Roller File Rest

Discussion in 'Horological Tools' started by TEACLOCKS, Apr 27, 2020.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. TEACLOCKS

    TEACLOCKS Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Mar 22, 2005
    2,317
    77
    48
    Male
    Clock service & repair
    Santa Rosa Calif.
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    What do you use for a "Double Roller File Rest" or single roller, for your Sherline lathe ?
    Did you have to manufacturer one or doe's sherline have one of there own ?
    Could you show some pictures ?
    Thank you for the help
    Lloyd
     
  2. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Jan 7, 2011
    11,257
    1,568
    113
    Male
    Retired from Xerox
    Breamore, Hampshire, UK
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Hi Lloyd,

    Those rests are for filing a flat or a square on a work piece such as a winding arbor.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  3. David S

    David S Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 18, 2011
    7,195
    245
    63
    Male
    Professional Engineer - Retired
    Brockville, On Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Lloyd,

    Here are some pictures.
    side view close 2.jpg guide in use.jpg Those are two needle bearings on home made shaft.

    Added a guard to protect the jig.
    file guide with file edge guard.jpg

    David
     
  4. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
    NAWCC Member

    Oct 19, 2005
    43,172
    1,184
    113
    Male
    Self employed interpreter/clock repairer
    North Carolina
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    I'll move this to the tools forum ;)
     
  5. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
    10,223
    830
    113
    Male
    Trappe, Md.
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    This is the one I made. Three small ball bearings from www.mcmaster.com 1/4" square brass stock, cap screw. If I make another one I would consider using four bearings to accommodate a wider file.

    RC

    ballnbearing-file-guide.jpg
     
  6. motormaker

    motormaker Registered User

    Apr 5, 2010
    102
    11
    18
    Tucson, AZ
    And here is one that I made utilizing readily replaceable oilite bearings...

    Filerest.jpg
     
  7. DeweyC

    DeweyC Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 5, 2007
    2,109
    762
    113
    Watchmaker
    Baltimore
    Country Flag:
    A single roller rest is preferred by many, such as the one made by RC.

    The double roller is not used to straddle the work anyway. I have seen people struggle with this trying to create a minute adjustment for getting the right dimension. Whether you use a single or double rest, it goes outside the workpiece and you have to watch the witness of the marks and measure frequently. I use a permanent marker on the work surface to help me control taper.

    Assuming you are filing a square (and are removing 1/2 the required material to get down to the square if you do not move the filing rest you will wind up on the same file angle at the finish cut and the sides will be parallel. It is geometry.

    The secret is to use a one piece t-rest holder, not a hinged one.
     
  8. dave-b

    dave-b Registered User

    Jul 28, 2010
    40
    1
    8
    Country Flag:
    #8 dave-b, Apr 28, 2020
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 28, 2020
    It is worth considering mounting the roller axles at a slight ( 5-10 degree) angle from the horizontal. This allows for fine tuning the depth of cut by advancing/retracting the cross slide.
    Dave.
     
  9. dave-b

    dave-b Registered User

    Jul 28, 2010
    40
    1
    8
    Country Flag:
    My last post was misleading. I meant adjust the rollers so that one is a little higher than the other so the file is at a 5 - 10 degee tilt. Then fine tune depth of cut with cross slide.
    Dave.
     
  10. DeweyC

    DeweyC Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 5, 2007
    2,109
    762
    113
    Watchmaker
    Baltimore
    Country Flag:
    Seriously, do not overthink this. It is not hard to learn how to file, measure and control taper. These are such an essential kit of skills to learn that most watchmakers do not bother milling out a stem.

    But if these are not skills you will use on a regular basis, then taking the time to setup for and learn how to mill may be more useful.
     
  11. Dushan Grujich

    Dushan Grujich Registered User

    Jun 20, 2003
    607
    45
    28
    Male
    Watchmaker
    Bondi
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    G'Day Dewey!

    I would say that it is not only a question of skill. Myself, at times, I have encountered a problem of procuring - buying quality files, they require replacement since they do not last forever. It is much like with sawing metal, particularly steel that is not annealed, even brass. If one has high quality fret saw blades it is easy to keep sawing in a straight line, but if one can get only cheap saw blades? Having access only to cheap blades, I dare You try and saw in a straight line regardless of the skill level. It is the same with files, I am certain that You do know difference between say Valorbe files or Sandvik files against the no-name ones. Everything comes at a price.

    In some cases and under some conditions it may be faster and easier to mill.

    Cheers, Dushan
     
    DeweyC likes this.
  12. DeweyC

    DeweyC Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 5, 2007
    2,109
    762
    113
    Watchmaker
    Baltimore
    Country Flag:
    Dushan.

    Absolutely!
     
  13. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    May 31, 2005
    2,618
    337
    83
    Male
    wisconsin
    Country Flag:
    Lloyd
    When I purchased my first Sherline Lathe, I made an adaptor that allowed me to mount Watchmaker lathe tool rests on the Sherline thus various tools that came with the rest such as a file rest.

    I quickly learned that a Sherline lathe is a machine tool lathe and not designed as a fixture to assist hand work. Once I started using it as a machine tool, things I had done previously by hand, no longer had any appeal since they could be machined more accurately and efficiently in less time.
    One quick example would be the construction of a replacement winding stem as follows. While this can be done on either a lathe or Mill, I will give a brief explanation of the Lathe procedure since you asked about the lathe.

    (1) Square stock would be mounted in the Lathe using a self centering four jaw chuck and major diameters machined per the first photo.

    (2) The second and third photos show machining the square to size with a Endmill. Square stock was selected to be used as a square index in the tool post. Each flat is machined and the stock is rotated in the post. Size of the square is pre determined by hand wheel settings with the same accuracy as turning round stock. The lathe assures that the square is square, centered and non tapered. Winding arbors that have a slight taper such as some clocks and rare occasions in watches are easily duplicated by rotating the tool post slightly.

    (3) Once the square is machined, the stock is returned to the chuck for remaining machining in the normal manner. Before removing the square stock from the chuck, the flat being held by the "A" jaw or any jaw was marked and returned to that jaw to assure the stock runs true.

    The fourth photo shows the Adaptor I made for mounting a watchmakers Lathe rest on a Sherline.

    Fifth photo shows the rest mounted.

    Jerry Kieffer

    fullsizeoutput_58c.jpeg fullsizeoutput_58e.jpeg fullsizeoutput_58f.jpeg fullsizeoutput_591.jpeg fullsizeoutput_590.jpeg
     
    wefalck and Old Rivers like this.

Share This Page