Dorflinger

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by John Arrowood, Nov 19, 2002.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. John Arrowood

    John Arrowood Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 14, 2001
    738
    153
    43
    Does anyone have information about Dorflinger, a clockmaker/dealer in Graz, Austria ca 1875? I have a 30 hour Vienna Regulator style clock with that name of the dial. it's an early model since it has wooden arms protruding from the backboard for the movement base to slide into. I recall reading in the Bulletin article about Viennea Regulators that the 30-hr models with this mounting fixture were pre-1875. The mounting piece for the round gongs is marked Wien, which I know is Vienna. The gong bracket is mounted to the seat board instead of the case. The case is a dark-stained wood, no turned columns, no veneer. The door has curved edges, and a rounded top. While the case is attractive the porportions are not as pleasing as those of cases for 8-day clocks. The time train is weight driven and the two strike trains have springs. The springs are enclosed in round boxes fastened to one of the plates and the clicks for the springs are not visible so I have been unable to see how to release the tension of the springs.
     
  2. John Arrowood

    John Arrowood Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 14, 2001
    738
    153
    43
    Does anyone have information about Dorflinger, a clockmaker/dealer in Graz, Austria ca 1875? I have a 30 hour Vienna Regulator style clock with that name of the dial. it's an early model since it has wooden arms protruding from the backboard for the movement base to slide into. I recall reading in the Bulletin article about Viennea Regulators that the 30-hr models with this mounting fixture were pre-1875. The mounting piece for the round gongs is marked Wien, which I know is Vienna. The gong bracket is mounted to the seat board instead of the case. The case is a dark-stained wood, no turned columns, no veneer. The door has curved edges, and a rounded top. While the case is attractive the porportions are not as pleasing as those of cases for 8-day clocks. The time train is weight driven and the two strike trains have springs. The springs are enclosed in round boxes fastened to one of the plates and the clicks for the springs are not visible so I have been unable to see how to release the tension of the springs.
     

Share This Page