Does Anyone Recognize this Young Lady?

PaulWeber

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Feb 10, 2017
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Hi All… I recently acquired a “new” crystal regulator with a French movement. Rather than the typical mercury pendulum, it came with a bob pendulum (which I believe is original to the clock). Regardless, the bob contains a picture of a woman.

Does Anyone know who she is? Is she some historical figure, or just a random woman. Thank you.

9C960102-5CEB-4C5B-9C78-7A40652AF6E8.jpeg 10A5BA78-983D-4728-A7A3-00401C01DC9A.jpeg D7FD5A27-B896-4CF1-9916-A2F2A8BC50E3.jpeg
 

Burkhard Rasch

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could be Eugenie de Montijo , wife of Napoleon III , french emperor at the time this clock was made.
Just a guess though...
Burkhard
 

Steven Thornberry

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Ticktocktime100

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Hi,

A fine clock with an unusual pendulum, which I also believe is original. The clock's movement is stamped "France" which indicates that it was not made before 1900, closer to 1910. It is possible, despite the clock being later than Napoléon III, that this is his wife Eugénie - but it could be just a portrait miniature of an "élégante", a Victorian French woman as many were depicted by artists such as Renoir or Degas.

Regards.
 

new2clocks

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The clock's movement is stamped "France" which indicates that it was not made before 1900, closer to 1910.
The effective date for the McKinley Tariff Act (to which you refer) was March, 1891. So, a clock with country of origin on the movement would be no earlier than 1891.

You may be thinking of the country of origin on the dial (another U.S. requirement), which would date a clock to no earlier than 1909.

However, the OP's clock has no country of origin on the dial and the OP has not provided pictures of the movement. Are you referring to the clock in the link that Steven provided?

Regards.
 

PaulWeber

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Feb 10, 2017
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Here’s a shot of the back of the movement showing the “France” mark.

Referencing the McKinley Tariff Act to aid in dating a clock is an interesting idea. But I can think of at least 2 additional issues that raises….

1. Can we really safely assume clockmakers didn’t mark the nationalities of their clocks pre-McKinley Tariff Act (even if they weren’t required to do so)?

2. Wouldn’t the McKinley Tariff Act only apply to products originally imported into the USA—which we don’t know to have been the case with this clock? Perhaps the maker of this clock marked its origin to comply other countries’ own versions of the McKinley Tariff Act, the effective dates of which may (or may not) have preceded the McKinley Tariff Act.

By the way, I’m not trying to be a smarty-pants. This just got me thinking. And these may well be easily answered questions for you guys who routinely date clocks. But I’m here to learn! (And to impress my wife when I parrot your answers without giving due credit.)

9B990379-ACA0-422F-95EE-D9B6030921D8.jpeg
 

new2clocks

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1. Can we really safely assume clockmakers didn’t mark the nationalities of their clocks pre-McKinley Tariff Act (even if they weren’t required to do so)?
(1) Yes, we can safely assume this. You will, on occasion, see a mark of 'Paris' on older French clocks, but Paris is not a country. Also, see my answer #3, below.

The other requirement under the McKinley Tariff Act is that the country of origin be in English.

2. Wouldn’t the McKinley Tariff Act only apply to products originally imported into the USA—
(2) Yes. A clock made outside of the U.S. for export to a country other than the U.S., would have no requirement to have their country of origin on their movements.

This changes somewhat in 1926 when the U.K. updated their Merchandise Marks Act to require a movement to show either country of origin or the term 'Foreign' on movements made outside of the U.K. for importation into the U.K.

Perhaps the maker of this clock marked its origin to comply other countries’ own versions of the McKinley Tariff Act, the effective dates of which may (or may not) have preceded the McKinley Tariff Act.
(3) There are no known Country of Origin requirements until the U.S McKinley Act was enacted.

By the way, I’m not trying to be a smarty-pants. This just got me thinking.
Your questions are good questions!

Regards.
 

PaulWeber

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Feb 10, 2017
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Welp….I think that settles it. So my clock was most likely manufactured after 1891 (due to the movement‘s country of origin stamp) but before 1909 (due to the dial’s absence of country of origin stamp). Me thinks you aren’t really all that new2clocks.

Thanks for the information everyone!
 

captainclock

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Referencing to one of the comments on here made about Britain's Merchandise Marks Act of 1926, I found a few years ago at a local antique mall an old German mantel clock from the 1930s or so that says "Foreign" on the bottom of the dial which I had posted on here about and I was told it was a German clock that was meant for the British market, which is why it didn't look like anything that was imported to here.
 

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