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Disc pendulum with extension

tracerjack

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I’ve had this pendulum for some time. Picked it up as an orphan thinking I could use it, but I’ve never quite figured out which style of torsion clocks used it. It is stamped with #137220, and if anyone has a clock with that number, I would gladly see it reunited. In the meantime, if someone could help me better understand with which style it would look appropriate, I could put it to use and give it some purpose, rather than sitting in a drawer.
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Schatznut

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I would think it'd be appropriate with a clock from the 1890-1915 time period. The extension is unlike anything I've seen before. It suggests perhaps it was used with a movement in a bandstand case.
 

tracerjack

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Yes, I thought only bandstands, but saw it with Kurt’s Kienzle, matching numbers and all, which looks like a regular standard.
 

tracerjack

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The info in the link is great. Personally, I can hardly tell one pendulum from another. Only ones I can spot is Kundo and Schatz. The rest are a blur. The disc are even worse for me. Were Kienzle standards taller than other maker’s or was the extension just a style they offered?
 
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KurtinSA

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I agree on the visual nature of disk pendulums...I just don't have the eye. Although I can spot a Gustav Becker pendulum easily. I have several other Kienzle clocks with the "standard" pendulum hook. The clock I'm working on in the other thread has tall columns...guess it's hard to see in the picture. The columns are around 4-1/2 inches tall...looks like the regular columns are less than 4 inches.

Kurt
 

tracerjack

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The taller columns could be why it has the extension. Perhaps it has something to do with the suspension springs lengths available at the time. Maybe more cost effective to make an extension rather than fabricating longer suspension springs.
 

etmb61

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That's a Kienzle pendulum like Kurt's in this thread:

I've observed that they were used with the tall column clocks with 4 inch dials (like Kurt's) and the shield dials (see clock 90 in the RG). There isn't much room under the movements on the louvre clocks for the extra spiral tops to fit.

I think the extensions were added to make the pendulums more interesting to look at rather than an issue with the springs. I have a similar JUF clock with tall columns but it had a disk pendulum with the regular hook. To me it looks kind of odd.
juf tall.jpg

Eric
 

tracerjack

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I see what you mean. I didn’t notice the height in Kurts clock, I think because the extension height blends in with the height of the columns. The short version makes the columns on yours look even longer than I expect they really are. Well, at least I now know what style of clock used my pendulum.
 

Dells

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I always thought that the pendulum extension was for large brass and glass cases ( for example like Grivolas ) am I wrong then.
 

whatgoesaround

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I imagine they would go with clocks with more distance, as above. I have three clocks with the extension; one as pictured above, one is in a wooden case like a crystal regulator style, and one is in a brass case with a lower window for viewing the pendulum. Dell, unfortunately, not one of these is a Grivolas, much to my chagrin.
 

Dells

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Whatgoesaround
I only said like a Grivolas because that is the only clock I have seen that has the extended pendulum although I know other manufacturers have used them , ( by the way I do own a Grivolas)
 

MUN CHOR-WENG

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The use of the pendulum extension is to occupy the space above the pendulum so as to create a more balanced visual image. The first use of disc pendulum extension in 400-day clocks can be traced to the time when the Harder verge escapement wall clock was made in 1878, first by A Willmann Co and later by Gustav Becker in 1880. In both cases the pendulum disc used was based on the one used by Becker for his cylinder escapement clock made in 1872 as shown below.
1635489334429.jpeg

To use just the pendulum disc alone for the wall clock would leave much of the space in the clock case empty thus creating a rather unbalanced look. So in an effort to remedy that, an extension in the form of three connected long pillars was made and then pinned onto the pendulum disc to form the pendulum for use in the wall clock. See pictures below.

1635489368980.jpeg
As can be seen from the picture on the right, the disc pendulum with the added tall gallery blends well with the rest of the clock. This gave rise to the first disc pendulum with a gallery for use in the 400-day clock. The verge escapement clock shown above was made by Gustav Becker for Anton Harder in 1880. Later in the early 1880s a number of Harder wall clocks were made with deadbeat escapement and using the tall 3-pillar disc pendulum with a slightly different design. Clocks featured in a contemporary advertisement shown below shows four clocks in different case styles with each fitted with a tall disc pendulum quite similar to the one shown in the above picture. Quite possibly the clocks were fitted with verge escapement. These disc pendulums with a tall gallery were not listed in the Repair Guide.

1635489523048.jpeg

We have also documented examples of extensions being installed onto other types of pendulums for use in 400-day wall clocks such as the two shown below. The one on the top is a JUF time piece in a simple wooden box case with a 4-ball pendulum The at the bottom is by Kienzle in a brass banjo style case with a 2-ball pendulum. In both cases a long brass barley twist extension piece is attached to the pendulum. This extension piece provides an added benefit by catching light that spirals up and down as the pendulum oscillates. Mirrors were post-factory installed in the clock case to further enhance the visual appeal.

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Mun C W
 

tracerjack

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Very interesting, I have never seen those examples of torsion wall clocks.I now see that the extensions are purely for visual balance. Thanks, Mun.
 

KurtinSA

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There are a handful of images in the 1910 Jahresuhr catalog showing clocks with twists for pendulum extensions...and some clocks that don't have one...you can see the difference in how the visual spacing works. It looks like Andy100s clock on No 277 in the catalog. Also Mun's banjo looks like No. 282 in the catalog except that the catalog has a disk not individual balls for the pendulum.

Kurt
 

MUN CHOR-WENG

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Eric,

Yes, that's the same one, a 400-day clock from Terwilliger's 1986 Silent Auction. The back plate with serial number 142086 is similar to Plate 1574 F which has the same serial number.
This clock was featured in an article in the December 2019 issue of The Torsion Times.

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Mun C W
 
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