Chronometry: Digitized Board of Longitude materials

Discussion in 'Chronometers' started by Luis Casillas, Oct 28, 2015.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. Luis Casillas

    Luis Casillas Registered User

    Oct 16, 2012
    570
    9
    0
    Software
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    For those of you who may not be aware of this, the University of Cambridge's website has freely available digitized copies of many original papers and print publications of the Board of Longitude who were central players in the development of chronometers in the 18th and early 19th centuries:


    Many of the primary sources cited in Gould's The Marine Chronometer are available on that website. Just one example: the published records of the Greenwich trials of Thomas Mudge's first chronometer. So we can for example graph the recorded rates of Mudge's first chronometer from June 21, 1776 to November 30, 1777:

    Mudge #1, 1776-06-21 to 1777-11-30.png

    The rate acceleration that can be plainly seen is the reason Maskelyne and the Board judged Mudge's No. 1 unsatisfactory. The straight period right after the second half is the one that Gould on the other hand focuses on to argue that Mudge's chronometer was perhaps judged unfairly (see p. 79, and Appendices I and II).
     
  2. Luis Casillas

    Luis Casillas Registered User

    Oct 16, 2012
    570
    9
    0
    Software
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    #2 Luis Casillas, Oct 28, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2015
  3. Ralph

    Ralph Registered User
    NAWCC Member Sponsor

    Jan 22, 2002
    4,663
    61
    48
    Country Flag:
    Luis,

    Thanks for posting the link... now all I have to is find the time to explore it. It looks worthy of spending some time there.

    Regards, Ralph
     

Share This Page