Difficulties Using the Sherline Steady Rest

Discussion in 'Horological Tools' started by Uhralt, Oct 28, 2019.

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  1. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Maybe I'm doing something wrong. I have difficulties that prevent me from using my Sherline steady rest for re-pivoting of long arbors. I can't get close enough to the end of the arbor sticking out of the steady rest to clean it up before drilling the hole for the new pivot. The reason is that the cross-slide gib touches the steady rest before the cutting tool can reach the arbor. The same problem would arise when I would try to machine an oversized pivot down.

    Another problem is that due to the same interference I can't get the tail stock as close to the arbor for drilling the hole as I would like it for stability and alignment.

    Any suggestions how to overcome these obstacles?

    Thanks,

    Uhralt
     
  2. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    Nov 13, 2011
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    would you pls post a photo or two? thx...
     
  3. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    Uhralt
    It can be an issue with older Lathes without the tailstock cutout. Not sure what you have.

    First I should explain that I use Sherlines adjustable chuck holding accessory and brazed carbide lathe tools. Under these conditions, I have not had issues.

    (1) There is about .200" of gib in front of the "L" shaped gib retaining clip that serves no purpose. I ground it off shortening the distance discussed per first photo.

    (2) When I encounter this concern, I use a brazed carbide "AL" tool configured per first attached photo for facing and turning.

    (3) Second photo shows a 1/16" Albrecht chuck and a carbide spade drill for spot drilling, the smallest chuck I use on this Lathe.

    (4) Third photo shows a Rohm 3/8" chuck the largest used on this Lathe.

    The standard 1/4" chuck may require partial extension of the tailstock ram, but not enough to cause issues in my experience.

    Jerry Kieffer

    fullsizeoutput_44b.jpeg fullsizeoutput_44c.jpeg fullsizeoutput_44d.jpeg
     
  4. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Thank you Jerry! I was hoping that you chime in. This is very helpful. I will go ahead, grind off that piece of the gib and do some tests using your configuration. For some reason I routinely use the right handed tool and didn't see the advantage that the AL tool provides in this situation.

    Thanks again,

    Uhralt
     
  5. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    sorry, but can someone add an arrow pointing to the’gib’? thx
     
  6. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    I would like to highlight the gib but I don't know how to do this. It is the dark colored bar on the right front of the cross slide that touches the steady rest. There is a steel wire coming out of it that goes under the cross slide. The gib is a kind of shim that minimizes any slack in the crossslide. It is adjustable.

    Uhralt
     
  7. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    so it's not pictured in any of jerry's photos, right? it's in front of the cross slide, between the crank and platform?
     
  8. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Here is a close up picture of the gib of my lathe. It is not (yet) shortened.

    Uhralt
    Gib.JPG
     
  9. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    The gib is visible in the first of Jerry's pictures.

    Uhralt
     
  10. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Bruce,

    These pictures are of a different cross-slide, but gib strips (red arrow) are an essential part of the sliding components of any lathe. The screws with blue arrows are two of the four adjustment points which control the degree of play in the slide.

    Gib Strip 1.JPG Gib Strip 2.JPG

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  11. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    Bruce
    In this case we are discussing the Sherline carriage Gib. Its location and adjustment can be found in the Sherline "assembly and instruction guide" under part #40540 in the rear exploded view pages of the guide. If you own a Sherline machine tool, it is advisable to have this guide as all machine tools are less than effective if not properly adjusted.

    The attached photo from post #3 has a arrow pointing to the gib.

    Jerry Kieffer

    fullsizeoutput_45c.jpeg
     
  12. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    thanks... a little difficult here with the power out... so you shaved off the left-most bit of the gib to allow the tail stock to get that much closer to the left, yes?
     
  13. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    Yes, but only because it serves no useful purpose.

    Jerry kieffer
     
  14. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    bad design? or just one of those things to be worked around?
     
  15. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Without the steady rest the length of the gib doesn't cause any problems. Using the steady rest it only causes a problem if the area you want to work on is very close to the steady rest, as in a re-pivoting situation. Anything that sticks out of the steady rest more than 1/3 inch or so can be handled without a problem. I've just cut down the gib close to the retaining wire using a jeweler's saw. Easy to do and now I can get close enough to the rest.

    Uhralt
     
  16. Chris Radek

    Chris Radek Registered User
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    Instead of having grub screws (blue arrows) to adjust the gib like shown in Graham's photo, the Sherline has a tapered gib and its play is adjusted by sliding it in and out. That's why it has extra length. It might have more than strictly necessary, but it's on purpose.
     
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  17. doc_fields

    doc_fields Registered User

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    I modified mine some time back removing all visible part of the gib and the rod, then marked and drilled a shallow hole in the gib where one of the grub screws goes in. I haven't had any problems with that arrangement yet. The grub screw holds the gib in place and moves it as I move the slide back and forth. No slop either.......................gary
     

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