Depthing tool

SimPivot19

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Jul 15, 2019
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Hi

I acquired this in a job lot. I believe it is a type of pivot depthing tool, yet it appears a little different. I wondered if anyone has a similar one so I can work out what is missing. It is stamped with a capital “B” in a diamond - maybe a maker mark?

Any help will be gratefully received

Thanks

Simon

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gmorse

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Hi SimPivot19,

I believe it is a type of pivot depthing tool, yet it appears a little different. I wondered if anyone has a similar one so I can work out what is missing.
I agree with Dewey that it's not a depthing tool but probably some sort of spanner; either for lenses or maybe screw backs on watch cases. A depthing tool needs to hold both pivots of each of the arbors under test. You don't give any dimensions, so it could even be an opener for stiff jam-jar lids!

Regards,

Graham
 

gmorse

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Hi SimPivot19,

I believe I've seen a similar tool being used by bomb disposal crews in films about WWII. It was one way of unscrewing the fuse cap from the bomb.

Regards,

Graham
 

SimPivot19

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Intriguing, perhaps the horologist was an ex-bomb disposal expert - I suppose bombs used to be quite mechanical!

thanks, Graham
 

SimPivot19

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Your comment also reminded me of an old Alister Simms movie entitled “The Green Man” where he plays an assassin who makes bombs and has a side line in mending clocks, great film.

Simon
 

tom427cid

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It is a depthing tool, check out Malcomb Wilde and Penneman's book. It is shown by both. Primarily used in situations like positioning motion works idler during movement construction.
Hope this helps.
tom
 

Jerry Kieffer

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Hi

I acquired this in a job lot. I believe it is a type of pivot depthing tool, yet it appears a little different. I wondered if anyone has a similar one so I can work out what is missing. It is stamped with a capital “B” in a diamond - maybe a maker mark?

Any help will be gratefully received

Thanks

Simon

View attachment 613399 View attachment 613400 View attachment 613401
Simon
If it was used for Horological purposes, the shape of the tip at the end of the photo arrow is typical of what is used to remove a watch case back. I have seen several similar arrangements made from various tools at watch and clock marts over the years.

The second photo shows a variation example and its intended use. Sorry about the cruddy items from the junk drawer for illustration.

Jerry Kieffer

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SimPivot19

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Hi all

thanks for all the replies. I think it was definitely used in horology as the job lot was from an ex-watch/clock maker. It looks like it was used for opening watch backs, but maybe the two slides which are detachable may have been replaced so that it could also be used as a depthing tool using other parts now missing - so maybe there was a bit of clever duality at work here. I think clock and watchmaking is a synonym of ingenuity!

many thanks

Simon
 

Tim Orr

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Good evening, Simon!

I'm not grasping how yours could be used for depthing, but I can tell you that you can buy similar tools on the Bay, on American Science & Surplus, and even at Harbor Freight Tools, all described as being for watch case opening. The nicety with yours is that thumbscrew for fine-tuning the setting of the one pin. My trouble with these is that sometimes, on case backs, the indents aren't exactly 180º apart.

Because you're only gripping at two, rather than three points, they also have a tendency to slip, risking marring the case back.

Here are a couple pictures of one I bought a long time ago: Ruihua1.jpg Ruihua2.jpg
Note the cylindrical points. They wouldn't accept a pivot, and if you put them into pivot holes, they'd have to be very large pivot holes.

Once, in very early days, I bought a Y-shaped spanner from Harbor Freight ("Salvage" – in those days), and ground the points down with a file, then adjusted them to the spacing I needed and tightened a nut to secure the spacing. Not a very efficient way to do the job, but in those days, I didn't know much about sourcing tools, and (to be honest) didn't care much about boogering up case backs. Here it is: HFS1.jpg HFS2.jpg
Note the incredible precision filing job on the pins!

Best regards!

Tim Orr
 
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