Dating Kieninger & Obergfell Standard 70mm x 92mm, eccentric nut adjuster Anniversary Clock Movement

JTTrey3

Registered User
May 20, 2017
52
0
6
Country
I am in the process of restoring this 400 day clock (See attached pics). I am trying to determine the approximate manufacture date.

Can anyone help me determine approximately when this was made? Serial # 41799 20170715_122155.jpg 20170715_122201.jpg 20170715_123035.jpg 20170715_222926.jpg 20170715_223103.jpg


The base is a disaster, and I have turned a new walnut base for it. I will post photos when it is finished.
 

MartinM

Registered User
Jun 24, 2011
3,059
105
63
El Dorado, CA
Country
Region
Early June, 1931. (Provided I'm reading the SN correctly (41799).
John Hubby may amend that, based on better information.
 

tracerjack

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Jun 6, 2016
1,399
178
63
Lodi, CA
Country
Region
You say the base is a disaster, but I can't see any cracks in the photos. If there are cracks, then yes, a disaster. If it is just tarnished, it will restore beautifully with polishing and be original to the clock.
 

JTTrey3

Registered User
May 20, 2017
52
0
6
Country
The base is cracked and separating. Since I was focused on identifying the mechanism, I did not post this pic, but you can see some of the damage here 20170715_123104.jpg
 

bangster

Moderator
Staff member
NAWCC Member
Jan 1, 2005
19,876
445
83
utah
Country
Region
I think this thread should be in the Torsion Clocks forum, but I'll leave it here.

I wonder if that base is repairable?
 

JTTrey3

Registered User
May 20, 2017
52
0
6
Country
I wonder if that base is repairable?
That is a good question. It seems thin, but it might be possible to braze the brass. Such a repair is far beyond my skills. Since this will be a gift, I have chosen to turn a new base out of walnut. It isn't original, but it looks nice on it.
 

MartinM

Registered User
Jun 24, 2011
3,059
105
63
El Dorado, CA
Country
Region
That is a good question. It seems thin, but it might be possible to braze the brass. Such a repair is far beyond my skills. Since this will be a gift, I have chosen to turn a new base out of walnut. It isn't original, but it looks nice on it.
Much too thin to braze and just applying the heat would likely make it come apart even more
Not to mention the wooden disc on the inside not being able to survive.
 

Burkhard Rasch

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Jun 1, 2007
4,865
169
63
64
Twistringen
Country
Region
I think that is the problem of the base : someone applied water or another liquid to the base resp "soaked" it in a cleaner of some kind and the wood inside the base expanded and caused the cracs.This is a quiet early KundO retaining its original pendulum.Not disregarding a nice selfmade wooden base :if it were mine I´d look for a donor clock and get the original base for it in course of the restauration.
Just a thought,though...
Burkhard
 

KurtinSA

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Nov 24, 2014
3,867
170
63
San Antonio, TX
Country
Region
What about using some kind of glue to hold the base pieces together? If the cracks can be closed up somewhat with some judicious pressure, then applying a layer of cement on the inside of the base shell might be enough to keep it together and certainly keep it from getting worse.

Kurt
 

John Hubby

Senior Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Life Member
Sep 7, 2000
12,289
224
63
The Woodlands, TX
Country
Region
JTTrey, thanks for posting your Kundo photos here and your inquiry. Martin's date is spot on based on the serial number you provided and can be seen on the clock back plate. In lieu of a replacement base, your making a turned walnut base to the same profile is a good solution. The correct base can be found if you wish to return the clock to original condition, to my knowledge Kundo didn't make any turned wood bases even though other makers did do so.

With regard to the existing base, could you post a photo of the underside so we can see the actual construction? At the time your clock was made Kundo were introducing a formed steel under-support that has the wood disc sandwiched between the support and the brass cover; if it is one of those a repair is virtually impossible. If it just has the wood disc support there are some ways to close the cracks, although yours has rather severe horizontal cracking as well s the radial crack.
 

Fitzclan

Registered User
Jul 20, 2014
652
25
28
Long Island, New York
Country
Region
Doesn’t seem like you have anything to lose by attempting a repair. I would go with Kurt’s suggestion. I personally think it would look better even if it doesn’t come out perfect.
If the repair is unsatisfactory, you have only lost your time. Certainly worth a try.
 
Know Your NAWCC Forums Rules!
RULES & GUIDELINES

Find member

Staff online

Forum statistics

Threads
161,044
Messages
1,397,200
Members
83,004
Latest member
standardtwin
Encyclopedia Pages
1,099
Total wiki contributions
2,788
Last edit
How to wire a 24 volt secondary for a 12 volt ITR/IBM Master clock system by Toughtool