• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

D. Perret Locle 18K Hunter Case Watch, detached lever 13J, extremely detailed etched silver dial. Can't identify.

Albert58S

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Jan 21, 2021
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I have a fairly large pocket watch collection that I'm thinking about start selling off. I know what most of them are by brands, movements, year of production, etc. I always knew I had one that was a very special and never researched it much after acquiring it over 8 years ago as part of a collection from a friend I'd known for over 25 years. (It was in his late dad's collection)
From my research for Perret watches, there is no D. Perret listed. A watchmaker I showed it to thought the "D" could be possibly a son or relative to one of the Perret's who are listed in the watch books. The movement is not marked so it is Swiss movement. It also has the original old box and the key. I suspect the watch's age is 1850's to 1870's. The case has a low serial number of 7025 (18K stamp is near this number), which is also on the front and back covers. 7025 is also on the dust cover. On the back case, there is also an addition serial number 5489 above the case makers mark of something like A H & C. There is also a small hallmark stamp shaped like a "one way sign" except has 2 "V"s in the center, and the outside (ends) of the arrow form a crown. The finely detailed etched dial has buildings, trees, even a sailboat, and the watchmaker thought it was possible the dial was silver. This watch has one of the finest nicest dials I have ever seen.
Any help in identifying more about this watch would be appreciated, such as who is D. Perret, the maker of the case, approximate production year, and especially why the dial is so special like it was a presentation piece. I can attach pictures upon request.
 

Dr. Jon

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Welcome to his forum.

Pictures will help a lot.

The V's you refer to are probably the Nechatel hall mark for gold.

We do not allow links to active sales and your post is on the edge of that. Assuming that s not currently for sale we can give you more information from pictures. If you do decide to sell it please notify me by private message so I can quarantine the thread until after the sale.

My book, Pritchard's Swiss Timepiece Makers 1775-1975 has a David Perret of Neuchatel, actually two of them, father and son. The firm started in 1854. They were fairly prominent. The father's obit is in Journal Suisse d'Hologerie Vol XXXIII No.4 Oct 1908 p 116
 

Albert58S

Registered User
Jan 21, 2021
6
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Welcome to his forum.

Pictures will help a lot.

The V's you refer to are probably the Nechatel hall mark for gold.

We do not allow links to active sales and your post is on the edge of that. Assuming that s not currently for sale we can give you more information from pictures. If you do decide to sell it please notify me by private message so I can quarantine the thread until after the sale.

My book, Pritchard's Swiss Timepiece Makers 1775-1975 has a David Perret of Neuchatel, actually two of them, father and son. The firm started in 1854. They were fairly prominent. The father's obit is in Journal Suisse d'Hologerie Vol XXXIII No.4 Oct 1908 p 116
I appreciate the information, especially for who the D. Perret might be referring. As far as this watch, I'm in no hurry to sell this unique watch, and if I do offer it for sale, I will let you know. I have dozens of other really nice pocket watches to sell before I consider selling this one and I may end up keeping this particular watch. For the Neuchatel gold marks you mentioned, I did some research and could not find the particular mark that is shown on my watch case. I've attaching pictures of the case markings, what is on the dust cover, as well as the magnificent silver etched dial. I also attached a picture of the original case and key. Knowing the maker of the gold case from the trademark stamps might shed more light on the age of this watch and some about its history. Thanks for any help. 20210122_074846_1.jpg 20210120_184950_2.jpg 20210122_073458_3.jpg 20210122_073117_2c.jpg 20210122_073100_1c.jpg 20210120_184801_dial.jpg
 

Dr. Jon

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Dec 14, 2001
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The mark is the Neuchatel mark. It is not in most books but I did find it in one of Tardy's books on marks on gold. Several makers add the words "Gold mark for Neuchatel" around the mark on watches they exported to the US. It is an unusual Swiss mark, probably because Neuchatel did not become part of Switzerland until 1857 when Tardy wrote that this mark came into use. This dates the watch to after 1857 which is also consistent with the marking on the inner case.

The dial is not etched but either engraved, guillouched or embossed.

In case you had not noticed, the hands are mismatched.

It is also odd that the case number and the number on the inner cover are different.0, but I have seen it in watches I believe are intact.
 

Albert58S

Registered User
Jan 21, 2021
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The mark is the Neuchatel mark. It is not in most books but I did find it in one of Tardy's books on marks on gold. Several makers add the words "Gold mark for Neuchatel" around the mark on watches they exported to the US. It is an unusual Swiss mark, probably because Neuchatel did not become part of Switzerland until 1857 when Tardy wrote that this mark came into use. This dates the watch to after 1857 which is also consistent with the marking on the inner case.

The dial is not etched but either engraved, guillouched or embossed.

In case you had not noticed, the hands are mismatched.

It is also odd that the case number and the number on the inner cover are different.0, but I have seen it in watches I believe are intact.
Thanks. I appreciate the information for the gold trademark and how the dial was created. I now see the mismatched minute and hour hands you mentioned. Which hand configuration do you believe would be original? I'll look for some era matching hands and have the watch returned to an original matching state. For the numbers on the front/back case and on the dust cover, they do all have a "7025" stamped on them.
 

Dr. Jon

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Dec 14, 2001
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It is a guess but I think the minute hand is more likely original. The style is common to the period an it is the correct length although it is alightly bent. The hour hand is short.
 
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Albert58S

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Jan 21, 2021
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Thanks. I'll shop around for a matching hour hand or maybe just replace them both with same period hands.
 

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