Cutting a new escape wheel

Discussion in 'Tower, Monumental & Street Clocks' started by doug sinclair, Sep 5, 2016.

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  1. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User

    Aug 27, 2000
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    #1 doug sinclair, Sep 5, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 6, 2016
    In 1990-91, our group located, restored, and installed a Howard round top tower clock movement in a local historic cupola. We knew when we installed it that the escape wheel's future was somewhat limited owing to two damaged teeth. The previous owner had allowed the escape wheel to roll of a high work bench, onto a concrete floor! Owing to the amount of work we had to do, and time constraints, we decided to use the wheel, knowing eventually it would have to be replaced. Well, the wheel performed until 1999. Upon checking the operation of the escapement one day, I noticed that one tooth (a chipped one) had worn to the point that it was not locking, but advancing to the pallet impulse faces. I shut the clock down. I conscripted my friend Trevor Beatson to fabricate a new escape wheel. The pictures portray the process. These didn't come out in the order that I selected them, but you'll get the idea.


    image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg
     
  2. Ticktinker

    Ticktinker Registered User
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    Thanks for sharing this Doug,
    Did someone create a drawing to work from on this project? Or did the work proceed straight from measurement of the existing wheel and the supposed full dimensions of the part? It might be interesting to see a drawing if one was made...
     
  3. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User

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    As I recall, very rudimentary drawings were made in order to establish angles and dimensions. This was 16 years ago, so no drawings exist. The diameter of the new wheel was cut 25 thousandths larger than the original wheel to accommodate for wear over the nearly 70 years the clock had run. Originally, the clock was put into service in 1905. The building it was installed in was torn down in the early 1970s, but the clock had been shut down prior to that as it required work. It sat in a warehouse until it was discovered in 1990. At the time the new wheel was installed, new pallets of steel gauge plate were fabricated, as well. The bearings for the pallet arbor were also replaced. The new ones were made 5 thou. off center, and were designed to allow them to be turned in order to allow for adjustment. The clock continues to function well, today. It soon will require some work to the strike side components. But it runs within one minute per month.
     
  4. Ticktinker

    Ticktinker Registered User
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    Very nice!
     
  5. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User

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    Thanks to Peter Nunes for sorting the pictures into the correct order. I had no idea that was possible using the edit function.
     
  6. gleber

    gleber Registered User

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    While posting, you can also move the photos around on the page after they are loaded by dragging and dropping (at least using Chrome on a Windows PC).

    Tom
     

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