• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Custom-made Arbor?

Aaron B

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Dec 16, 2020
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The strike arbor (the part the hammer connects to, not the strike train winding arbor) on one of my movements broke in half while I was re-inserting the strike hammer rod. The arbor is 1 1/16 inches long and I can't find anywhere that sells a replacement that is that size. Do I need a custom made part?
 

shutterbug

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Could you post a pic of the part?
 

Aaron B

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Dec 16, 2020
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Could you post a pic of the part?
The hole was drilled off center and makes it impossible to re insert the hammer lever. The stop wire is also splitting. The whole arbor just needs a complete replacement.

27125129-7542-484F-B31B-F011EC147D54.jpeg B38C9CE9-3FBB-401B-82ED-0F36C037912F.jpeg
 

Willie X

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A length of mild steel round stock and some judicious filing (and drilling) will do it. You may (or may not) be able to reuse the old wires. Are you mechanically inclined? Willie X
 

Jerry Kieffer

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The hole was drilled off center and makes it impossible to re insert the hammer lever. The stop wire is also splitting. The whole arbor just needs a complete replacement.

View attachment 639241 View attachment 639242
Aaron

Based on your photos, there is bad news, bad news and good news.

Bad news is that your arbor is a very weak design.

Next bad news is that if a duplicate is made or a replacement is found, it will still be very weak.

Good news is that your existing arbor is very easily and quickly repaired resulting in a much stronger arbor. My personal repair is as follows.

(1) The arbor half`s are mounted in my Chinese Mini Lathe (Was purchased for this type thing) per attached photo example along with the hammer lever as an assembly.

(2) The assembly is then high temp. Silver soldered together making the arbor as a whole much stronger than the original.

(3) Any excessive solder is then removed by bead blasting making the repair almost invisible after lightly polishing to original finish.

Jerry Kieffer

fullsizeoutput_7f4.jpeg
 
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kinsler33

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Or, you could improve matters by using an arbor that's larger in diameter than the original. Do the cross-drilling carefully and use mild steel wire for the levers. For the pivots on the ends, use the re-pivoting technique suggested by Al Takatsch's repivoting video. A lathe isn't necessary if you have an electric drill that will run for a long time without overheating.

Mark Kinsler
 

shutterbug

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Jerry - I've never though of using a lathe to hold parts together like that. Cool idea, and a good use for the Chinese lathe :)
 

Jerry Kieffer

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May 31, 2005
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Jerry - I've never though of using a lathe to hold parts together like that. Cool idea, and a good use for the Chinese lathe :)
Shutterbug
Actually the lathe is ideal in this case in that it can apply pressure to the assembly that aides in the strength and appearance of the repair.

However, in many cases, I also use the Chinese Mini Mill as a giant "C" clamp for this type of work per attached photo especially small assemblies.

In these cases, worn oil stones are used for both a base and clamping tip.

The first advantage is that one can patiently position small parts to be high temp soldered and then use the slides to position them under the clamping tip. Once positioned to ones advantage, in most cases pressure can be applied without disturbing the assembly and holding it in place for high temp. soldering or welding.

A small round oilstone works best as a clamping tip that can be easily shaped as required on a bench grinder.
In addition, oil stones or other stones do not wick heat from small parts making the repair faster and more precise. Further more, solder will not attach to them.

Jerry Kieffer

fullsizeoutput_7f5.jpeg
 
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Aaron B

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Dec 16, 2020
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Or, you could improve matters by using an arbor that's larger in diameter than the original. Do the cross-drilling carefully and use mild steel wire for the levers. For the pivots on the ends, use the re-pivoting technique suggested by Al Takatsch's repivoting video. A lathe isn't necessary if you have an electric drill that will run for a long time without overheating.

Mark Kinsler
Where would I buy such an arbor? I have checked timesavers but the arbors they sell are too long for this application. The arbor is 1 1/16 inches long. Not sure if this is helpful info but the arbor comes from a ca. 1890s Badische Uhrenfabrik 30 hour movement.
 
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kinsler33

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If you're totally without a junk box (establish one: it's vital) then purchase a piece of steel rod from the hardware store and saw off 1 1/16". Add pivots to each end.

M Kinsler
 
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Aaron B

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If you're totally without a junk box (establish one: it's vital) then purchase a piece of steel rod from the hardware store and saw off 1 1/16". Add pivots to each end.

M Kinsler
Ok. That sounds very simple. I'm assuming the pivots you mentioned are like these ones? I should probably start a junk box as well for future repairs like these.
 

kinsler33

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Nope. Instant pivots probably work, but try this:
He sells the center finder tool through eBay.
Here is the discussion about this method: https://mb.nawcc.org/threads/al-takatschs-repivoting-tool-and-video.147471/

In short, what you do is drill holes in the center of the ends of the steel rod. Then you push in a thin rod that matches the hole diameter into that hole and hold it in with LocTite. In this case, it doesn't have to be very accurate, and you can use thin nails for pivots because they don't have to be hardened. I buy 'pivot wire' assortments from Timesavers when it's on sale.

In Al's video, don't bother trying to use drills for pivots, and don't worry about the lathe work--it's not necessary. You do, however, have to spin the arbor in a drill chuck.

Mark Kinsler
 

Aaron B

Registered User
Dec 16, 2020
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Nope. Instant pivots probably work, but try this:
He sells the center finder tool through eBay.
Here is the discussion about this method: https://mb.nawcc.org/threads/al-takatschs-repivoting-tool-and-video.147471/

In short, what you do is drill holes in the center of the ends of the steel rod. Then you push in a thin rod that matches the hole diameter into that hole and hold it in with LocTite. In this case, it doesn't have to be very accurate, and you can use thin nails for pivots because they don't have to be hardened. I buy 'pivot wire' assortments from Timesavers when it's on sale.

In Al's video, don't bother trying to use drills for pivots, and don't worry about the lathe work--it's not necessary. You do, however, have to spin the arbor in a drill chuck.

Mark Kinsler
Thanks!
 
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