Cuckoo whistles

POWERSTROKE

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I’ve read about the whistles in some that are glued in. Haven’t run into that yet. I also understand that the ones that are glued in at the factory would not have screws and brads through the case. Is this correct? I have one that has screws and staples from the factory as shown. Do the staples act the same way as a brad would?

611E583F-B5EC-4B26-8259-261564A57F03.jpeg
 

Altashot

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I’ve worked on some that had the flutes glued in. You have to pry them off carefully.

Yours here are held with screws and staples. Yes, the staples are like brad nails.

I normally leave the staples in and realign then with the little holes in the flutes before reinstalling the screws.

M.
 

Willie X

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Power,

There will be no doubt when you run across a 'glued in' one ... Willie

The rubber band is there to fix a bellow top that won't close completely. This is a sure sign that a clock has been stored for a long time, laying on its back.
20190218_124857.jpg
 
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THTanner

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If you just slightly dampen the bellows fold lines with a fine paint brush the correcting squeeze goes a lot faster.
 

POWERSTROKE

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Power,

There will be no doubt when you run across a 'glued in' one ... Willie

The rubber band is there to fix a bellow top that won't close completely. This is a sure sign that a clock has been stored for a long time, laying on its back.
View attachment 586253
Why would they glue the bellows on and still screw and staple them on.
 

POWERSTROKE

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Another question I have, is I’ve seen the holes where the screws hold the whistles to the case too loose or worn out threads in the wood. how can you fix this correctly?
 

JimmyOz

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Why would they glue the bellows on and still screw and staple them on.
It is better not to glue them on at all, if you come across glue only take a thin sharp knife and use it like a saw between the case and the bellow to get it off, clean the both faces up and then screw the bellow back on and put a nail in, make it easer for the next repairer.
Another question I have, is I’ve seen the holes where the screws hold the whistles to the case too loose or worn out threads in the wood. how can you fix this correctly?
Just move the bellow up or down a little and then screw it back on and hit the nail back in.
 
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John P

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Another tip is to close all extra holes in the flute. I use tape.
 

THTanner

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Another tip is to close all extra holes in the flute. I use tape.
It is interesting that those extra holes do not really matter much. The sound is produced by the puff of air flowing over the fipple in the top section of the whistle. This is similar to the musical instrument called the Recorder that so many kids learn to play in grade school. Any holes don't really affect the production of the note or the loudness very much, but they can change the pitch just like the finger holes in the Recorder. Most whistles have a sealed bottom block, but they still work with that block missing if they are long enough, they are just a lot quieter as some of the air flows out the bottom instead of over the fipple. I have used that as a way to make the bird quieter when a customer asked to tone it down.
 

shutterbug

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It is interesting that those extra holes do not really matter much. The sound is produced by the puff of air flowing over the fipple in the top section of the whistle. This is similar to the musical instrument called the Recorder that so many kids learn to play in grade school. Any holes don't really affect the production of the note or the loudness very much, but they can change the pitch just like the finger holes in the Recorder. Most whistles have a sealed bottom block, but they still work with that block missing if they are long enough, they are just a lot quieter as some of the air flows out the bottom instead of over the fipple. I have used that as a way to make the bird quieter when a customer asked to tone it down.
I never considered that! So in theory, one could tune the things by positioning the holes low or high. Or make a series of holes and cover the ones not needed for the desired note. Very interesting observation, TH. And I'm both humored and grateful to know that the thing has a name :D
 

THTanner

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I never considered that! So in theory, one could tune the things by positioning the holes low or high. Or make a series of holes and cover the ones not needed for the desired note. Very interesting observation, TH. And I'm both humored and grateful to know that the thing has a name :D
You can only effectively tune the long whistles. The short ones do not really respond because the holes change the effective length of the standing wave inside the flute. If the flute is too short then the standing wave is hard to modify.

Below is a three inch whistle with the bottom block removed. In open mode it produces a high F# note - if you put your hand over the opening it produces a lower B-flat. That is a rather extreme example - but it is fun to play with. Do you remember the toy "Slide Whistle"? You blew through the mouth piece and moved a slide in and out of the whistle body to make gawd awful noises until your parents threw it away? You can tune the Cuckoo whistle the same way by inserting blocks in the tube at different levels. The problem is that only so many standing waves will form. So you cannot create just any note in a short tube. The longer the tube the more standing waves that can be induced.

And here is a Slide Whistle - LOL


Whistle2.jpg Whistle.jpg
 
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THTanner

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That’s an older whistle....,
Yes - an old all wood one with the fipple cut directly into the wood piece. The newer ones have a plastic top and plastic fipple. The note is controlled by both the fipple and the length of the sound chamber below it.
 

bangster

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Trivial Facts:
1. The recorder is also called a "fipple flute"
2. Hezzie, of "The Hoosier Hotshots" played the slide whistle. Find them on Youtube.

In case you were wondering.

Additional Comment: That guy's performance is amazing.
 
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Willie X

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Stevie Wonder knows what to do with a penny whistle ...

With some sperimenting and a linkage to change the pitch along with the bellows stroke, you could make one or two sliding notes like a 'wolf whistle' and other interesting sounds.

Patent pending, Willie X
 
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THTanner

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Stevie Wonder knows what to do with a penny whistle ...

With some sperimenting and a linkage to change the pitch along with the bellows stroke, you could make one or two sliding notes like a 'wolf whistle' and other interesting sounds.

Patent pending, Willie X
In my design of that, each lift of the bellows pulls the slide up a bit and latches - after 4 latched stops the slide is released and drops back to the bottom, so you get a 4 note stair step from high to low..

The sound chamber does not have to be straight. So you affix a a second tube taken from a Slide Whistle and attach it up the back side of the Cuckoo whistle linked near the bottom into the sound chamber of the whistle. There should be enough room between the Cuckoo whistle and the back door on most common Cuckoo clocks that don't have a music box down there.

And if the common Cuckoo drives you crazy can you imagine a Cuckoo that is out of tune with itself? Have at it - :)
 

bangster

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Or you could have paired whistles tuned a 5th apart, to make a pleasing chord when the birdie speaks. Or tuned some other interval to make him really disgusting.

The possibilities are endless.
 
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THTanner

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Or you could have paired whistles tuned a 5th apart, to make a pleasing chord when the birdie speaks. Or tuned some other interval to make him really disgusting.

The possibilities are endless.
About the only think I do in this regard is a vent or two to make the bird quieter if the owner asks.
 

dennisondik

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Ok. I am trying to understand the Cuckoo whistle. I just had a problem with one and found that the fipple was glued on wrong and the opening was a little too wide to produce a good whistle. (originally it sounded like just rushing air).. I popped the fipple off and was surprised to see that there was a piece of leather directly behind the fipple. it was a square piece about 2mm thick and about 3/4 inch square set at a slight diagonal just behind the fipple. The leather was obviously intentionally placed within the whistle since it was in a slot that was cut inside the whistle that the leather was held in. . I thought the whistle was all wood other than the bellows. can anyone enlighten me on this?
 

shutterbug

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I think you're right - it's not original. No doubt someone was in there trying to modify it to act differently than it was intended to.
 

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