Cuckoo runs, but hands don't

Chris

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I'm working on an antique (early 1900's) cuckoo with bone hands and a square end on the minute tube. The clock runs fine, but the hands don't move. There seems to be enough tension on the spring that presses against the gear on the front that meshes with the minute tube and hour tube.

Are they not moving because there is too much pressure on the minute tube from the hand nut?
 

harold bain

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Chris, that won't be the problem, as too much pressure should stop the clock. Post a picture of the front of the movement. Some of the older clocks were driven by the intermediate gear, and need a tension spring there. Follow the time train to check for this.
 

shutterbug

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Yes, by all means post a few pictures. There may be a gear inside on the minute hand arbor that is cracked. Check for that and get back to us, OK? :)
 

wingardclocks

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I agree with Shutterbug. My first instinct would say there is a problem with the gear on the minute arbor. I have a few early 1900 and earlier cuckoos and on some the wheel (gear) is friction mounted with a three prong spring washer with a pin through the arbor securing it all.
If this is the case, check and see how easy it is to turn the minute shaft with hour tube removed. It should be some what tight but not very tight, or use a felt-tip marker and mark minute wheel and its arbor together. Run the clock and see if the marks don't seperate. If they do, dismantle the minute wheel arbor assm. Check for cracks, slightly bend the spring washer to create more friction. I never place oil at the point of the friction between the gear and arbor.
 

RJSoftware

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The center hole where spring fits on arbor. Isn't it suppose to grip there? Probably slipping at that point of contact. Is that section suppose to be square and fit to arbor?

RJ
 

harold bain

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Like I thought, the spider spring is under the intermediate gear. Not enough tension on that spring, and the hands won't move. You may need a thicker washer on top of the gear. I had that problem with a Kuner quail clock, took a bit of fiddling to get the right tension.
 

Chris

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Ok, I'll try that. The spider washer does have a square hole on it. I bent the washer up a bit yesterday, so much so that it was a tight fit with the washer and pin. Didn't do the trick. I'll bend some more tonight. Thanks, Chris.
 

harold bain

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Just make sure the rest of the motion works is free to turn easily.
 

al_taka

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harold said:
Just make sure the rest of the motion works is free to turn easily.
The center shaft is stationary, if the minute hand jams against the washer and pin it will stop the hand from turning. The minute hand is supposed to be very slightly loose on the shaft to allow it to turn.

I look forward to my next cast brass movement.
Al T.

 

harold bain

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They aren't bad to work on. Probably easier than your average Regula. As you can see in the first picture, the ratchet wheel directly drives the motion works, via the gear on its arbor. It has to slip to set the hands, but be tight enough to drive the hands. A delicate balance of power.
 

Globalmike

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I'm having same issue, clock is ticking but hands don't move and seem loose. Does any one have pictures of what and how the gears are to be installed. When i took it apart there was no pin to hold the gears together so I might not have done it right?

THESE ARE BEFORE I CLEANED IT.

hands loose.jpeg GEARS.jpg IMG_6828.jpg IMG_6830.jpg
 

Willie X

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On the first photo, remove the outer post nut. Then move the large nut (behind the minute hand) about 4 turns further onto the hollow shaft (minute hand cannon) be careful not to get into the HOUR hand cannon. Then you will need another large nut, you are missing one nut, to lock the minute hand on its square with a nut on both sides. When the minute hand is secured on it's cannon, replace the outer post nut. This nut (the post nut) has but one purpose. That is, to keep the minute cannon from sliding outward more than a about .020". Both hand cannons should be completely free to move in and out a bit on their shaft. This is called "shake". The post nut should be tightened with finger pressure only, to tight and this can kill your shake. No shake = no run.
:) Willie X

As already discussed in the old part of this thread, the hands are driven by the clutch on the back of the small gear to the left. This assembly has to be held together tightly with a washer and a cross pin. I don't see these in the photos??
 
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shutterbug

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Also that spider spring shown in the second photo goes on just as it is shown. The legs should be toward the gear, not toward the plate.
 

Globalmike

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On the first photo, remove the outer post nut. Then move the large nut (behind the minute hand) about 4 turns further onto the hollow shaft (minute hand cannon) be careful not to get into the HOUR hand cannon. Then you will need another large nut, you are missing one nut, to lock the minute hand on its square with a nut on both sides. When the minute hand is secured on it's cannon, replace the outer post nut. This nut (the post nut) has but one purpose. That is, to keep the minute cannon from sliding outward more than a about .020". Both hand cannons should be completely free to move in and out a bit on their shaft. This is called "shake". The post nut should be tightened with finger pressure only, to tight and this can kill your shake. No shake = no run.
:) Willie X

As already discussed in the old part of this thread, the hands are driven by the clutch on the back of the small gear to the left. This assembly has to be held together tightly with a washer and a cross pin. I don't see these in the photos??
This picture is before it was cleaned sorry, I put the clutch first then the gears and used a small wire as the pin was missing and not know about a washer. Am not sure how tight it should be, is there a diagram on how one like mine should be assembled? I guess I would need to disassemble again?
thanks for your help!
Should the minute hand rotate backwards? As it is and turns so so easy compared to other cuckoos I’ve wound?
 

Willie X

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It has to have a washer to work properly over time. An "S" wire is much preferred over a tapered pin here.
Turning this one backwards is a no-no.
Willie X
 

JimmyOz

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You have the right amount of nuts just in the wrong order, which is a common occurrence on this type of cuckoo clock.

The hour hand is friction fit,
Then the minute hand goes on, it will not foul the hour cannon as that is short of the end of the tread.
Put the big hole nut on next.
Put the small hole nut on.

I have attached a photo with the right order starting from the left with the minute cannon.
CIMG0849.jpg
 

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Rockford's early high grade movements by Greg Frauenhoff