Cuckoo door

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by POWERSTROKE, Oct 30, 2019.

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  1. POWERSTROKE

    POWERSTROKE Registered User

    Jan 11, 2011
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    I have two cuckoos. One the door snaps shut with a certain force, the one In Question closes, but more lazily. What is an easy way to increase the snapping force of the door?
     
  2. R&A

    R&A Registered User

    Oct 21, 2008
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    Pull the return spring tighter
     
  3. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Agreed. The spring is at the base of the perch. Wind it one more turn and is should snap shut like the other one. You might need a small hook to grab it after winding it one more turn. They tend to want to get loose.
     
  4. POWERSTROKE

    POWERSTROKE Registered User

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    Do you have a pic or where I should wind it?
     
  5. Schatz70

    Schatz70 Registered User

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    I like pretty much all of the noises that a cuckoo clock makes - the ticking, the sound of the rack dropping on the warning, the gong, the bellows, and most definitely that thwack! noise the door makes when it slams shut at the end of the strike. On the Schatz 8 day cuckoo I'm working on there is no spring - there is a counterweight on the back of the door lever that slams the door shut by the force of gravity when the door lever is released at the end of the strike.
     
  6. POWERSTROKE

    POWERSTROKE Registered User

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    There is a spring on the perch on mine. I don’t know how I would go about wrapping it another turn. Looks like it could be easily mangled. Clock works fine if the top is angled ever so slightly off the wall. If I pull the door open at any given time it seems to snap shut fine. Only doesn’t snap when it’s actually cuckooing.
     
  7. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

    Aug 17, 2014
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    This sounds silly, but sometimes the door behaves better with the tiniest bit of oil is applied to those horrid 'hinges.'

    I like the ancillary cuckoo noises as well.
     
  8. JimmyOz

    JimmyOz Registered User

    Feb 21, 2008
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    Check the tail of the bird is above the wire coming out of the bellow.
     
  9. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    If the door is closing, it's probably OK as is. All clocks have little nuances of their own ;)
     
  10. POWERSTROKE

    POWERSTROKE Registered User

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    #10 POWERSTROKE, Nov 8, 2019
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2019
    So randomly the door will stay open. It can run fine for hours or days and then all of a sudden it will cuckoo and the door will not close. If I manually open and close the door let’s say at 12:15 it will open and close fine. What actually closes the door? The spring pulls the perch back, but it seems as though the lever that pulls the perch wire does not release properly? Or is the spring supposed to do that? I feel like the rod that is supposed to release the perch is not snappy, not the perch itself. What can a poor ol guy like me do?
     
  11. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    The closing is totaly on the spring. All good information above.

    Usually it's obvious which end of the spring is intended to take an extra round.

    Note, dont bend the spring around the shaft another turn but using tweezers unhook the spring and bring the tail around and reattach it as it was. The spring has noy been changed but will have 360 degrees more tension.

    The door slamming is also my favorite of all the sounds. Make sure the door is actually capable of slapping flat against the house. Sometimes the staples are bent wrong or too tight in a way that does not allow that crisp sound of a door with full and easy contact.

    WIllie X
     
  12. POWERSTROKE

    POWERSTROKE Registered User

    Jan 11, 2011
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    How do o do that? This clock is all original, not been run much. It was mine new.how do you go about wrapping that spring? Does the movement need to come out? Any videos?
     
  13. JimmyOz

    JimmyOz Registered User

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    We don't know what type of movement it is? Regula, Herr or some older movement. Post a few photos of the clock, one with the back door off, one with the cuckoo door open and one with it shut. It sounds to me to be something to do with the door, or the wire that is attached to the perch and the door. You might try just sticking two small bits of felt (the kind you put under chair legs) on the bottom of the back door, that will give it a bit of an angle out at the bottom and therefore the weight of the door will be wanting to shut. Another quick fix is slightly bend the wire (not to much) this will reduce the distance it opens the door slightly as it could be opening it just a fraction to far and locking the door open.
     
  14. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    Exactly what he said, though I cannot help adding that the application of a vanishing amount of oil to each of those wretched door hinges once cured a similar problem for me. And, in case Mr Oz' suggestion isn't clear, make sure that the clock leans a bit back from the vertical, which will enable the cuckoo door close more readily. (That is, the top of the clock case should be a tiny bit closer to the wall than the bottom of the clock case.)
     
  15. roughbarked

    roughbarked Registered User

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    Sometimes the end of the spring has broken. thus the spring is slipping and is weaker. A mistake can be to stretch the spring and bend a new bit on the end to hook around the plate. In some cuckoo clocks, stretching this spring can cause problems with the strike train running. If the spring has been shortened, drill a new hole in the plate to hook it closer to the door lever.
     
  16. POWERSTROKE

    POWERSTROKE Registered User

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    No broken springs. Jimmy Oz May be correct. I think at one point there were two small felt circles in the bottom. Could this be it? Where can I get them?
     
  17. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    Presumably the clock lives on the wall, a-hanging from a nail driven into said wall. (If you've done it right, that nail is actually a substantial screw driven into a stud, assuming a wood/plaster/sheetrock wall. ) Thus the back of the clock case would be flat against the wall, and vertical.

    To allow gravity to aid the closing of the cuckoo's door the clock should be tilted backward a bit. I'd suggest that someone interpose a chopstick between the lower portion of the clock case's back panel and the wall.

    The clock should also be supplied with a bracket to prevent it from tilting on its nail when it is being wound.

    M Kinsler
     
  18. POWERSTROKE

    POWERSTROKE Registered User

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    That thick?
    Yes. I have a substantial wood screw in a stud on the wall on all my clocks. So your saying to put something that thick at the bottom portion of the clock between itself and the wall?
     
  19. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    #19 Willie X, Nov 8, 2019
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2019
    Tilting back will make a difference but the door should work correctly at anything close to straight up.

    A big nail driven in at a 30 degre angle with a single small dollop of blue tack on the back near one of the bottom corners works for me.

    WIllie X
     
  20. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    Well, the door should indeed slam shut when the clock case is vertical, but if it doesn't, tilting it back a pencil-thickness (or chopstick thickness) from the vertical might help just enough to get by. The forces involved are very small, so eventually you'll want to get to the root cause.

    Second thought: try applying a bit of graphite via a pencil to the door hinges and perhaps the bird-to-door wire link. The door should definitely slam: you don't want a shy, quiet cuckoo bird. When he's done, he's done. Slam.

    M Kinsler
     
  21. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    It would be good to see (and hear) the clock when it's working right and when it isn't. Post to Youtube or similar site and link to it here.
     
  22. POWERSTROKE

    POWERSTROKE Registered User

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    #22 POWERSTROKE, Nov 9, 2019
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2019
    Tilting it back worsens it. It happens completely randomly. Like I said, it can run for a day or two no problem. Then all of a sudden. If I tap the wall it usually closes. Tilting the bottom of the clock out from the wall worsens it. It’s been running fine for about 18 hours now. One thing I notice is as it’s closing about 3/4 way closed it seems to be hitting almost a small detente. But it’s not rubbing.

    one thing I do notice is that the door seems to slightly sag downward at the lower edge
     
  23. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    Make sure that the cuckoo's tail is not dragging on the wire that tilts him on each cuckoo. This wire extends out from one of the cuckoo bellows, and should be clear of the cuckoo's tail when the strike train is at rest.
     
  24. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    Usually you can put the clock on a stand with the back door off and push the perch out repeadly from the back using a small dowell or skewer. If the door is not dragging on the outside, you can figure out where the interference is from the back. If there is nothing interfering ... more spring.

    WIllie X
     

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