Crude works Litchfield area tall case

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by Tom Vaughn, Jun 10, 2018.

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  1. Tom Vaughn

    Tom Vaughn Registered User

    Feb 10, 2018
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    A friend of mine gave me this crude type litchfield area clock yesterday. The winding drums are threaded so its most likely a product of the Hopkins family in Northfield. This clock is unusual in that the space between the plates measures exactly 3 inches. There is a front lifting lever for the strike side (which is missing).
    This clock seems like it might be an early product... The catching lever for the count wheel is not fitted through the back plate, instead, it is bent around the outer edge of the plate. The pinions are not laurel, and appear to be either birch or maple. The plates are both rather thick. There are four holes in the seatboard, and the seatboard is roughly carved away for the hour wheel to fit without brushing on the seatboard.
    The reason why I'm referring to this as a rather crude movement is because it looks to be cut entirely with the use of a single saw span cutting machine. (Basically, instead of a leading edge saw, tail edge saw, and crowning saw, it only uses a leading edge saw, which is raised or lowered to cut the tail edge after one whole indexing rotation has been made for the leading edge). Even the pinions are cut with a cutting machine, rather a milling machine, so this maker only had one cutting machine, and no milling machines at the time. Take a look at the strike side great wheel, one section shows where the maker was testing the depth of his cutting machine, which is why I'm suggesting this was a single span machine. The crowns of the teeth are rather shredded looking, so I'm positive this maker had no crowning wheel to round off the tops. The pinions are clearly hand filed up.
    Also.. The count wheel is pegged in with a reverse plug that is only held in place by the mounting wire. There is a mysterious wooden dowel that sticks inward near the count wheel, I haven't figured out its use yet.
    What do you guys think?
    I have a photo of Asa Hopkins' clock shop in Northfield which was in the attic of his carriage house across from his home. He used a great wheel for spinning yarn as the method of power to turn his machinery. This clock is clearly before Asa's three span cutting machine which he invented later on, so maybe this is an early product from his first shop? Or is it from Orange?

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  2. Tom Vaughn

    Tom Vaughn Registered User

    Feb 10, 2018
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    Here are some more photos... Also the dowel which holds the minute hand has no pinion end, it is just a wooden rod...

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