Cross slide shoe

Discussion in 'Horological Tools' started by Tokei, Feb 26, 2015.

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  1. Tokei

    Tokei Registered User
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    #1 Tokei, Feb 26, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2015
    Hi all,

    I recently bought a cross slide for my Peerless lathe.
    It's a Boley Leinen. That means it doesn't rest flush with the lathe bed.
    I was reading up on some old threads that this type of slide needs a shoe.
    Couldn't find any example on the web so decided to make my own.
    (hand tools guys, sorry)
    I'm attaching a couple pics. Hope it's helpful for anyone with the same issue.
    Works great and stays nice and firm without having to tighten the nut too much.
    That could risk cracking the t-slot in the slide.

    Regards,

    Tokei

    PS. The half round brass bar rests against the front of the lathe bed. Does anybody have a solution for the damaged slide top T-slot ?




    P2260686.jpg P2260697.jpg P2260696.jpg
     
  2. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

    Oct 11, 2010
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    Can you turn the top around, 180 degrees?
    Tinker Dwight
     
  3. Tokei

    Tokei Registered User
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    Hope these help


    P2280709.jpg P2280710.jpg
     
  4. MartinM

    MartinM Registered User

    Jun 24, 2011
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    Actually, I think Tinker's comment was a suggestion and not a request for for more info.
    But, with the new pictures, I don't see any way to do what Tinker was suggesting.
     
  5. Tokei

    Tokei Registered User
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    Lol Martin guess I'm kinda slow today.
    But no there's no way to turn the top to use the good side.
     
  6. MartinM

    MartinM Registered User

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    I'd think there would be some kind of a secondary parts market for something like that, as, I'd bet most of them got replaced due to problems with the leadscrew or tool post.
     
  7. trim

    trim Registered User
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    Feb 19, 2010
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    I have seen this damage fixed somewhere on the web - I don't have the link unfortunately.

    They simply milled off the broken top sections and screwed on two new plates to form the top of the slots. It actually looked OK, and was 100% functional.

    I have read that this problem can be caused by the style of tool holder you have. I was not convinced of the argument either way.
     
  8. Tokei

    Tokei Registered User
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    Martin:
    Wish there was a market for parts but haven't seen one yet

    Trim:
    I'm sure I saw it too. There was a site showing such a repair but it was a while back and can't find it anymore
     
  9. tsmith

    tsmith Registered User

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    I would think milling off the broken areas and brazing a replacement top would also work or maybe a combination of the two if you think the brazing lacked strength by itself. The replacement sections would be easy to fabricate and depending on the mount, would share the load with the unbroken slot.
     
  10. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

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    I'd say the milling and plates would be better.
    Most likely stronger than the original cast parts.
    Tinker Dwight
     
  11. Herschel

    Herschel Registered User

    Aug 13, 2019
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    I don't get what the half round brass bar is for? I would like a cross slide for my peerless and wondering what kind of cross slide would work. Good information I just don't get the brass bar thing.
     
  12. wefalck

    wefalck Registered User

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    To align the shoe perpendicular to the lathe bed, to align in turn the cross-slide.

    Normally there would be a kind of shoe sitting on top of the lathe bed with its negative profile. The sides of it would be absolutely perpendicular to the bed and the exact width of the recession in the cross-slide.

    Other types of cross-slides are flat at the bottom and there is a kind of stop with a key on top that fits exactly into the T-slot of the bottom. The stop has surface exactly perpendicular to the key, thus aligning the cross-slide.
     
  13. DeweyC

    DeweyC Registered User
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    It may have been me. Ten or fifteen years ago I pulled one of those lantern toolposts through my Levin Side rest and repaired it by milling the damaged section off, brazing a new plate and cutting the slot. Then I made a better toolpost.

    The problem is the lantern post where the toolpost key/clamp is smaller in OD than the adjusting nut. You can pull the clamp through like a punch press die. "Do not overtighten" is a subjective term!

    Below is a pic. Everything is soft to begin with (else you could not drill/modify these like many have; or by repairing with drilled holes for screws.). Surface grind the upper plate after the repair and all is well.


    Sliderest.JPG
     
  14. Herschel

    Herschel Registered User

    Aug 13, 2019
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    Thank you I thought it would be to align it but he said it rest on the front of the lathe bed. Maybe it hangs off the tailstock end and rest against the end of the bed. I guess that would somewhat align it
     
  15. measuretwice

    measuretwice New Member

    Jul 28, 2019
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    That looks really good...I've a similar repair pending for a boley slide rest. imo these messed up t slots are so common with these small lathes because of that style of tool post. If the tool post bolted into proper T nut of a decent length there would be a much longer section of T slot taking the load. You also end up with a lot of leverage with tool overhang with this style
     

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