Cottage Clock ID

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by clocks4u, Jun 19, 2019.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. clocks4u

    clocks4u Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Sep 2, 2000
    681
    27
    28
    Male
    Oregon
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    It's not unusual to find these cottage clocks without a label. Can anyone ID this by the movement? I was thinking Jerome or early New Haven. Thank you in advance.

    Chris

    IMG_8757.jpg IMG_8756.JPG
     
  2. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
    NAWCC Member

    Jan 15, 2004
    22,364
    1,125
    113
    Male
    Ne’er do well
    Here and there
    Country Flag:
    It is a Jerome & Co./New Haven movement. Read through posts 127 to 136 in the mini cottage clock thread. Although there I speculated that it might date from the 1870's to the 1880's, I now wonder whether it might be earlier. Your clock looks decidedly Jeromey, like the Union model.

    Mini Cottage Clocks
     
  3. clocks4u

    clocks4u Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Sep 2, 2000
    681
    27
    28
    Male
    Oregon
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Is it possible that's it's an early New Haven using up some left over Chauncey Jerome cases?
     
  4. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
    NAWCC Member

    Jan 15, 2004
    22,364
    1,125
    113
    Male
    Ne’er do well
    Here and there
    Country Flag:
    That's possible, I suppose, but remember, Hiram Camp, Jerome's nephew, started a movement shop in New Haven to supply movements to Jerome. He later incorporated this shop as the New Haven Clock Co. and, of course, continued to supply Jerome movements.
     
  5. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Nov 26, 2009
    5,289
    920
    113
    Country Flag:
    I would be curious to know the dimensions.

    Certainly does look like a Jerome "Union" style case. This case may be veneered in mahogany as here, as well as rosewood. It may have gilt stenciling, be ebonized with painted and MOP inlay, etc.

    This case was made for quite a while housing a variety of different movements including 8 day fusee movements, an example I have on my fusee thread. Here's one pic:

    img_2039-jpg.jpg

    An aspect of C. Jerome's genius. One basic case able to house a variety of movements.

    Look carefully at the lower outer backboard. You may see evidence that there was once a label there.

    Sometimes the dials were labeled as is the above..

    If you have a copy, see Chris Bailey's Bulletin Supplement about Jerome. He talks about and pictures these clocks. There's quite a few examples also posted on the MB with other movements.

    RM
     
  6. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
    NAWCC Member

    Jan 15, 2004
    22,364
    1,125
    113
    Male
    Ne’er do well
    Here and there
    Country Flag:
    To expand a bit on RM's comments. this post discusses a Union model with a 30-hour time and strike movement.

    Some Jerome clocks for viewing

    If you follow the link in the post to a thread started by Dave Coatsworth, you will see a Union model with what I believe is an A.S. Platt movement.
     
  7. clocks4u

    clocks4u Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Sep 2, 2000
    681
    27
    28
    Male
    Oregon
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    The case is 11 1/8" x 8" at the base. I don't see any indication there ever was a label on back. There is some red staining that looks more like dye, (picture) not remains of a label. The base on all three sides and front of the case is mahogany veneer. The sides of the box portion are pine. Stripped of the veneer maybe:???:

    IMG_8776.JPG
     
  8. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
    NAWCC Member

    Jan 15, 2004
    22,364
    1,125
    113
    Male
    Ne’er do well
    Here and there
    Country Flag:
    The 1853 trade catalogue lists the Union model as 13" high (no width given). My own is 13 1/2" high and 10" at the base. The height on yours is more in line with the height of Jerome's David Crockett model (12", per the 1852 catalogue). So, I don't know. Perhaps RM has some insight. At times, I look on these catalogue dimensions as only approximations.
     
  9. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Nov 26, 2009
    5,289
    920
    113
    Country Flag:
    #9 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Jun 21, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2019
    the
    See Bailey's supplement, pages 88 through 89 then pages 92-94.

    It's also why I asked about the dimensions.

    By the way, I often have a devil of a time matching the images from Jerome's 1852 catalog and the actual clock.

    Over the years, I have found all sorts of variations in dimensions and other details. Furthermore, not sure the illustrations and descriptions were quite spot on either. For example, I previously posted my examples of the "Paris Style, 8 day" and the "Paris Style, Lever" and the "Tudor Style, 8 day". Descriptions to the contrary in the catalog, NONE of them are made from papier mache. They are wood. The dimensions vary from those described as well. Not by a lot, but not quite the same. And with the greatest respect for Mr. Bailey, I think the clock he calls the Paris 8 day in figure 215 and the Paris, Lever in figure 216 are not the clocks corresponding to the ones in the catalog illustrations he has accompanying them. The ones I've posted are those clocks!

    The Crocket as Bailey shows it in figure 193 is a very different case. It has a removable back board. Most of the door is glass, not wood with a brass bezel. It's soft wood that is faux grained and stenciled. Frankly, I'm not even sure it's really the clock corresponding to the catalog image in figure 195. The case isn't mahogany or walnut. I've seen Jerome cottage clocks of walnut with gilt stenciling surrounding the door glass opening. I in fact think that they may be the Crocket and not the clock shown in figure 193.

    See this pic:

    crocket jerome1.JPG

    Anyhow. The first 2 clocks are actually the "Cottage Model". Not quite relevant but they were in the pic I had handy. And they are rather similar to the Crocket. Also note that they are basically the same clock...but there are variations. These are shown on page 88, figures 189-191.

    The 3rd one is what Bailey calls the Crocket. The last is a Union with a fusee movement. Dimensions not withstanding, it seems to be the closest style. I still
    lean in the direction of the Union, but now that I know the dimensions, it could be a different though similar model?


    RM
     

Share This Page