Correct Way To Wind?

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by JakeIndy, Mar 5, 2012.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. JakeIndy

    JakeIndy Registered User

    Mar 4, 2012
    12
    0
    0
    Im sure this has been asked before, but what is the right way to wind a new clock? Should you wind until you cannot anymore, or just until it feels very tight? I am afraid to wind too tight for fear of breaking something, but most people have said you can't over-wind, is this true? Thanks
     
  2. harold bain

    harold bain Forums Administrator
    Donor NAWCC Member

    Nov 4, 2002
    39,950
    43
    48
    Male
    self-employed in the clock business
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Wind it til it feels tight, then you are done. You can't overwind it, but you can underwind it, which will mean it will be unwound before it should be.
     
  3. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
    8,071
    29
    48
    Jake,

    Probably a good idea to do a good inspection of a "new" clock before you wind it at all. Many clocks, old and not so old, are put aside because of a winding incident due to faulty parts. My policy is to never wind a clock that is just brought in, for the same reason.

    Willie X
     
  4. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
    NAWCC Member

    Oct 19, 2005
    34,341
    30
    48
    Self employed interpreter/clock repairer
    Iowa
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    You can't over wind. Springs are very strong, but can be broken if your force the key after they're wound tight. What many of us do is wind fully the first time. The next time you wind it, count the number of turns to the same fully wound spot. After that, reduce the turns to one full turn less and use that number when winding the clock in the future. Note that this will actually give you a little bit more than the one turn insurance, and is probably better for time keeping too.
     
  5. JakeIndy

    JakeIndy Registered User

    Mar 4, 2012
    12
    0
    0
    Thanks everyone, a very knowledgable clock repairman friend of mine suggested that I dont actually need to wind until it won't wind anymore, but about 7 revolutions for each hole..And see if that lets the clock run for the full 7/8 day cycle...
     
  6. harold bain

    harold bain Forums Administrator
    Donor NAWCC Member

    Nov 4, 2002
    39,950
    43
    48
    Male
    self-employed in the clock business
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    It depends on what clock you have. Seven full turns is about right for most American clocks to run a week, but for some European clocks, three is a weeks worth (French clocks in particular). So while your friend's advice will work for some clocks, it won't work for all clocks.
     
  7. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
    8,071
    29
    48
    IMO it is a bad idea to count turns. Counting turns will ALWAYS result in either a run down clock or a wound up tight clock.

    FYI, wound up tight is the only reference point. You can back off a bit but you will have to learn where wound up tight is first.

    Willie X
     
Loading...
Similar Threads - Correct Wind Forum Date
What type and number of finials are historically correct for English tall case clocks General Clock Discussions Mar 15, 2017
Correct movement for case? General Clock Discussions Dec 5, 2016
English clock c 1900, help with correct date? General Clock Discussions Oct 8, 2016
"Tavanness" Beyer Zurich Brass And Onyx "Art Deco" Wind-Up Desk Clock / Circa 1930's General Clock Discussions Sep 9, 2016
Correct name for this clock. General Clock Discussions Jun 19, 2016

Share This Page