Connect Time recorder to mains

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by BobSeilh, Sep 24, 2020.

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  1. BobSeilh

    BobSeilh Registered User

    Sep 24, 2020
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    I hope someone can advise
    I’ve had this clocking machine for nearly 25 years and always wanted to connect to the mains

    Is it possible ?
    Do I need a transformer or current regulator or something ?

    would be great to have the clock working

    upload_2020-9-24_13-2-1.jpeg upload_2020-9-24_13-2-40.jpeg
     
  2. Toughtool

    Toughtool Registered User

    Aug 12, 2016
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    I have an IBM recorder that looks a lot like this unit. Mine has had the IBM electric conversion where they removed and replaced the two springs and wood stick pendulum with an AC 60Hz synchronous motor. This unit is not a conversion because there are no key holes in the clock's face which is where my mainsprings were wound.

    To me, the coils do not look like a motor, but maybe a solenoid for winding a mainspring. Is there a pendulum and mainspring? The long thin shaft looks like my drive shaft for driving the print mechanism's time and date wheels down below, and the day/night indicator seen through the hole of the wood panel. A couple of more photos may be helpful.
     
  3. BobSeilh

    BobSeilh Registered User

    Sep 24, 2020
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    Hi
    Thanks for your response
    No pendulum it was connected to the electric in the office so I guess no need for of pendulum.
    I don’t have lent more photos but send these if it helps



    i would only like to know f I could connect directly to the mains or need a transformer regulator etc

    upload_2020-10-4_12-27-58.jpeg upload_2020-10-4_12-27-58.jpeg
    upload_2020-10-4_12-28-26.jpeg
     
  4. Oldbo

    Oldbo Registered User

    Jan 16, 2016
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    Make sure it is not intended to be pulse driven from a master clock. You definitely don't want to connect it to the mains then!
     
  5. BobSeilh

    BobSeilh Registered User

    Sep 24, 2020
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    This is my question in fact
    How can I tell ?
    And can it be adapted ?
     
  6. Oldbo

    Oldbo Registered User

    Jan 16, 2016
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    Where you have photographed the two solenoids, see if there is a movable bar at one end of the solenoids. If you can depress this and the hands move, it will be pulse driven.
    That is how my Gledhill Brook clocks work and very possibly how your clock works.
    That's a good starting point. Let us know what you find.
     
  7. BobSeilh

    BobSeilh Registered User

    Sep 24, 2020
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    Hi there
    Yes I managed to moved something and the minute hand moved
     
  8. Oldbo

    Oldbo Registered User

    Jan 16, 2016
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    So you will need to drive the clocking machine with either a master clock or a pulse generator. I think National equipment generally runs at 6V DC.
    Try blipping a 6V DC power supply across the plug connector terminals to see that the clock moves. Probably in 30 second increments. This voltage is low, so you won't do any harm.
    If you don't want to go the master clock route then a pulse generator will be needed. They are available commercially or you can make your own.
     
  9. Toughtool

    Toughtool Registered User

    Aug 12, 2016
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    #9 Toughtool, Oct 4, 2020
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2020
    Your photo shows a hint. Look and see what numbers are in front of the "0 v". That may be the operating voltage of the coil. I agree with Oldbo, I think this is a slave to a master.

    Clipboard01.jpg
    Also notice the rod with the loop at the bottom. This may be a manual advance. Joe

    Clipboard02.jpg

    click on photos to enlarge view.
     
  10. Toughtool

    Toughtool Registered User

    Aug 12, 2016
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    Looking at a different photo, it looks like the coil operates on 20 volts DC.

    Clipboard01.jpg
     
  11. BobSeilh

    BobSeilh Registered User

    Sep 24, 2020
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    Thank - you guys are great
    So what’s the easy solution ?
    20v battery ?
    Transformer ?
    Sorry I’m not a electric guru at all
    Better at mechanical topics
     
  12. Toughtool

    Toughtool Registered User

    Aug 12, 2016
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    You either need a master clock or an electronic pulser unit with a minute impulse (or according to Oldbo, maybe a 30 second pulse) to run your clock.

    To test your clock locate a 20 volt Direct Current (DC) power adapter. If you have an 18 volt laptop computer adapter, that may verify the coil is working and if it will advance. Notice if the minute hand advances for each pulse. Connect one wire to the plus (the red wire out the top) and momentarily connect the other (black wire) to the negative and the solenoid should attract with a click. Disconnect and it armature should drop. If it moves one minute for each pulse then you need an accurate 1 minute pulse per minute driver to run your clock. I don't know the duration of the pulse needed but from .5 to 1 second ON, should be OK. Ken's clock clinic at: Model 1900W-UNV Modular Clock Winder - Ken's Clock Clinic also sells a couple of different pulsing units.

    If you want to DIY a pulser, you can build one like my master using the ESP8266-E12 NodeMCU, substituting the 24 volts power adapter with a 20 volt power adapter. Phil had included a 1 minute output in the latest software update. A second option is to experiment with my winder circuit and adjust the timing in software. I don't know how accurate the winder will be as I have not tested it but the ESP8266-E12 NodeMCU version uses the NTP network time servers to keep it on time. A connection to the WEB will be necessary. If you are interested in the ESP8266 I will draw a schematic for just the 1 minute output, requiring a single MOSFET transistor.

    ClockWindCircuit.png ESP8266NodeMCU.jpg
     
  13. BobSeilh

    BobSeilh Registered User

    Sep 24, 2020
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    Hi again

    i actually had a 20v laptop lead and tried this

    success with a click yes advanced a minute

    so I will visit your link to buy a pulser
    Many thanks again
     
  14. Toughtool

    Toughtool Registered User

    Aug 12, 2016
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    Great! Just to satisfy my curiosity, what happens when you put your finger in the wire loop on the left and pull down (see post #9, last photo). Does the clock advance? Joe
     
  15. BobSeilh

    BobSeilh Registered User

    Sep 24, 2020
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    Hi Joe yes it moves by a minute with a resounding click

    thanks
     

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