• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Confused about ordering bushings?

legosnell

Registered User
Nov 5, 2020
178
6
18
68
Country
Looking at ordering bushing that will work with specific cutter/reamer sizes. For example a cutter/reamer size 1.97mm. There are 2 options for height 1.5mm and 3.0mm. and bore size 4 options? Does the height have to do with plate diameter and are you better off going with the 3.0mm as opposed to 1.5mm? and what about the bore size? Since the bore size is going to have to be drilled out to the size of the pivot, is it best to just buy the smaller bore size bushings?
Looking to get bushings For cutters/reamers: 1.97mm, 2.47mm, 2.97mm and 3.47mm

each option is $5.50 to $7.00 2.0mm OD examples:

options available: 10 piece pack of brass Bergeon bushings from Switzerland. Size #1. Combine with other sizes for quantity discounts. 2.0mm OD x 1.5mm height x 0.40mm bore.

10 piece pack of brass Bergeon bushings from Switzerland. Size #2. Combine with other sizes for quantity discounts. 2.0mm OD x 1.5mm height x 0.50mm bore.

10 piece pack of brass Bergeon bushings from Switzerland. Size #3. Combine with other sizes for quantity discounts. 2.0mm OD x 1.5mm height x 0.60mm bore.

10 piece pack of brass Bergeon bushings from Switzerland. Size #4. Combine with other sizes for quantity discounts. 2.0mm OD x 3.0mm height x 0.60mm bore.

10 piece pack of brass Bergeon bushings from Switzerland. Size #5. Combine with other sizes for quantity discounts. 2.0mm OD x 1.5mm height x 0.70mm bore.

10 piece pack of brass Bergeon bushings from Switzerland. Size #6. Combine with other sizes for quantity discounts. 2.0mm OD x 3.0mm height x 0.70mm bore.
 

SuffolkM

NAWCC Member
Jun 15, 2020
131
38
28
Country
Getting the heights matched to the plate depth (often) saves quite a bit of time, as you otherwise have to get deeper bushes and file them to the right height before fitting. 2mm, 3mm are useful I find.

The inner diameter is important- you want to a variety of IDs so you can conveniently broach them slightly for enough shake. You do not want to have to make big changes here, as broaching small adjustments is far easier than gross changes. Starting with small bush IDs and making them significantly larger is not the way to do it.

The OD is the least important. You simply need enough to deal with any dodgy pushing-in and other wear around the pivots you are bushing. To be clear, the point of a larger OD is not primarily so you can broach more material.

Hope that helps
Michael
 
  • Like
Reactions: legosnell

Elliott Wolin

NAWCC Member
Nov 18, 2019
408
62
28
66
Williamsburg, Virginia
Country
Region
I use KWM bushings, and the bushings are made to go with specific KWM reamers. There's a chart that makes figuring this out very simple. I see on the web there's one for Bergeon as well (searching for "Bergeon bushing chart" works). I believe Bergeon has many more bushing sizes than KWM, one of the reasons I went with KWM (as do most hobbyists, I believe).

Also, in my opinion all you really need are a few reamers and a few bushings with matching ODs, you can always use a broach to open up the ID. I bought a very small number of KWM bushing sizes, typically the smallest ID for a given OD and thickness, and open the ID as needed. As a hobbyist it doesn't matter if I introduce an extra step. I have not found this to be a problem, just go slow and be careful (and if you have to knock a bushing out and try again, no big deal).

A professional likely would purchase all the different Bergeon sizes as this would often (not always) avoid having to broach the ID to size. As for me, I don't do enough clocks to justify a large investment in bushings.
 

TJ Cornish

NAWCC Member
Sep 12, 2013
420
65
28
St. Paul, MN
minnesotawatches.com
Country
Region
Disagreeing slightly with some of the prior sentiment, there's a reason there are 100 different bushings. You may not need all of them right away, but if you keep at this, you will eventually need most of them.

My advice: Pick a system - either KWM or Bergeon. KWM seems a little more complete in the US, not sure about elsewhere in the world, but both systems are fine. Once you pick a system, get a starter set in the height of the clocks you want to work on. I started with 1.9mm tall KWM, but quickly added 1.4mm tall and then 2.7mm tall. The starter sets usually go from about 1.0mm bore to 2.0mm bore. I haven't yet needed less than 1.0mm, but I have needed larger. I recently worked on my first 9-tube clock which needed 3.5mm tall bushings.

I wouldn't sweat broaching up 0.1mm if money is tight and you need to skip sizes, but any more than that starts to be a diminishing return.

I quite like the "The System" starter packs from Timesavers like this one: American Made Bronze KWM Bushing Assortment #1
 
  • Like
Reactions: legosnell

Elliott Wolin

NAWCC Member
Nov 18, 2019
408
62
28
66
Williamsburg, Virginia
Country
Region
I purchased a bunch of KWM bushings from Butterworth on sale/clearance. I purchased ones w/o oil sinks, which I make myself with a chamfering cutter. I install so few bushings that this strategy makes sense for me. I also bought an inexpensive random assortment on eBay including very small and very large bushings, I think they were Bergeon but I'm not sure. Between the two I've been able to find the correct size for the few clocks I've worked on.

I understand my strategy may not be appropriate for everyone.
 
  • Like
Reactions: legosnell

shutterbug

Moderator
Staff member
NAWCC Member
Oct 19, 2005
45,529
1,634
113
North Carolina
Country
Region
I have, a time or two, stacked bushings in very thick plates. I would not recommend bushings with oil sinks for that, but it works well if you don't have the length you need.
 

Jaap

Registered User
Mar 6, 2013
170
22
18
Country
Hi Shut, I think 2 bushes staket on each other is not a brilliant idee. Where would the oil go? Between the 2 bushes. I think in this case it is better to use bush wire, wich you could cut in the needed length, like we used to do in frisian clocks.
 

shutterbug

Moderator
Staff member
NAWCC Member
Oct 19, 2005
45,529
1,634
113
North Carolina
Country
Region
I don't know how much could. They are pressed pretty hard against each other. I agree though that a proper length bushing would be better if it's available.
 
Know Your NAWCC Forums Rules!
RULES & GUIDELINES

Find member

Forum statistics

Threads
163,515
Messages
1,420,849
Members
84,916
Latest member
Gsader
Encyclopedia Pages
1,101
Total wiki contributions
2,857
Last edit
Aurora's 15 Ruby Jewel Movements by Greg Frauenhoff

514 Poplar Street
Columbia, PA 17512

Phone: 717-684-8261

Contact the Webmaster for perceived copyright infringement (DMCA Registration Number 1010287).

Copyright © National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors Inc (A 501c3 non-profit corporation). All Rights Reserved.

The NAWCC is dedicated to providing association services, promoting interest in and encouraging the collecting of clocks and watches including disseminating knowledge of the same.