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Club tooth escape wheels

clocker2

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Nov 22, 2005
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I had posted in another subject about club tooth escape wheels and have gotten lots of questions about them so I decided to explain and show them in a seperate subject about them.

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I had a customer bring me an Ithaca Library clock with a Welch movement that had a severely damaged escape wheel. (See first pic above). I searched high and low to find a replacement wheel and met dead ends at every turn. Finally I decided to fabricate these myself on my new table top CNC milling machine. I spent lots of time drawing the wheel in a Cad program to exacting specs from other wheels that I had borrowed from collectors. I now make these for the trade as there is a need for these. I'll answer some of the questions that I received:

1. I see the rounded inside corners of the wheel....can you eliminate these? Yes, they can be filed and I have done this for some customers for an additional fee.

2. Do you use hard brass? Yes I use half hard brass for easier machining.

3. If I had you make me a wheel, would you mount it? Yes, I would prefer to do this for you to make sure it runs true.

4. Can you re-machine my old wheel? No, material is probably gone and the success rate of that procedure would not be good.

5. Can you do the Patti escape wheels too? Yes I can and have done some already.

6. What do you charge? Email me and I'll discuss that with you
clocker1617 at hotmail dot com

I welcome questions. Thanks.

Jeff Major
 

clocker2

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Nov 22, 2005
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Is there any perceived or actual benefits or advantages to this tooth design?
Not really. Its just another design. The impulse is from the tooth bevel rather than the pallet bevel. It certainly was more difficult for Welch to fabricate this wheel. That little hook that you see on every tooth is what makes this wheel so difficult to machine by conventional means. You can't machine it with one cutter like you can with most all other escape wheels.

Jeff Major
 

Scottie-TX

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Yeah. I've never cut a wheel but it's easy to understand that instead of needing two pallets the correct angle - it's here necessary to have EVERY tooth the correct angle! WHEW!
 

Studebaker27

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I just bought a cottage clock with this type of escape wheel. I wonder if it is the reason it is not running properly?
 

Scottie-TX

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Well certainly it could be but we don't know enough about your movement to counsel. Has it been recently serviced? What are the symptoms leading to stoppage if any? Is there power to the escape wheel when it stops? Are the pallet pins in good condition? A picture of the movement and closeup of the escapement would be very helpful.
 

shutterbug

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The downside of the club tooth is that the impulse angle is on the tooth rather than the anchor. As they wear, and the impulse deteriorates it has to be corrected on each tooth rather than one pallet of the anchor. Naturally, this makes other issues with lock and drop and becomes a major issue. That's the reason a new wheel is so practical, and it's great to have a source for them! I'm definitely bookmarking this thread :)
 

Jim Hartog

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I have this escape wheel in a Sessions 64 beat chain drive movement (regular chain) in a mission floor clock (case probably not Sessions). It is illustrated in Tran's Sessions book as 671 which is based on the spring version 669 also on page 257.

Someplace I read that this was a patent by B. B. Owen in 1870.

Jim
 
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shutterbug

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Ooops. Didn't realize this thread was so old :)
 

R. Croswell

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I only have one clock with this escapement - a Welch Spring & Co. The wheel has some wear but it is a strong runner and one of the best timekeepers in my collection. The main problem I see is the issue of replacing the escape wheel if it becomes damaged or badly worn. And of course recognizing it for what it is when adjusting it.

RC
 

Studebaker27

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Scottie-TX

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How unusual! I've seen a lot of movements but of course I haven't seen 'em all but a strip pallet anchor? Most I've seen have pin pallets such as in small alarm clocks with balance escapements. How are the pallets shaped? Are they like a knife edge or flatted? The anchor is shaped as a deadbeat so I guess this is a deadbeat escapement? Hmmmmm.
 

Jay Fortner

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How unusual! I've seen a lot of movements but of course I haven't seen 'em all but a strip pallet anchor? Most I've seen have pin pallets such as in small alarm clocks with balance escapements. How are the pallets shaped? Are they like a knife edge or flatted? The anchor is shaped as a deadbeat so I guess this is a deadbeat escapement? Hmmmmm.
Yeah Scottie,those are deadbeat. The ends of the anchor are shaped kinda like a normal DB anchor
but the impulse comes from the EW,well I guess a little EW a little anchor. That little ball on the leading edge of the EW tooth is so the lock faces of the anchor are not running on a sharp edge that would be soon worn down and reducing the lift and increasing drop. That's a cool little well desinged movement huh!
 

Studebaker27

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How unusual! I've seen a lot of movements but of course I haven't seen 'em all but a strip pallet anchor? Most I've seen have pin pallets such as in small alarm clocks with balance escapements. How are the pallets shaped? Are they like a knife edge or flatted? The anchor is shaped as a deadbeat so I guess this is a deadbeat escapement? Hmmmmm.
Sooooo I found something unique? I bought it as a project sorta.
 

shutterbug

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Not unique, but not common either. It's a dead beat with all the impulse from the tooth angle.
 

Studebaker27

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Well, I noticed that the escape wheel has one tooth with a significant chip off the end, and when I set the pendulum moving, it always seems to stop with that tooth in about the same placement at 12 o clock.
 

Jay Fortner

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Well, I noticed that the escape wheel has one tooth with a significant chip off the end, and when I set the pendulum moving, it always seems to stop with that tooth in about the same placement at 12 o clock.
That'll do it everytime! Mr. David LaBounty may have one of those in his vast inventory of old parts,he'd be my first choice.
 

Tinker Dwight

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The advantage is that the club foot has almost no drop. It
makes effective impulse over almost the entire rotation of the
escapement. This is as compared to the dead beat that needs
to loose 10% to meet clearences.
Tinker Dwight
 
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shutterbug

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That'll do it everytime! Mr. David LaBounty may have one of those in his vast inventory of old parts,he'd be my first choice.
Or try the contact for Jeff in post one and see if he's still manufacturing them. It would be good to know anyway :)
 

Studebaker27

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Or try the contact for Jeff in post one and see if he's still manufacturing them. It would be good to know anyway :)
I sent him a message yesterday. We'll see.
 

Thyme

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I only have one clock with this escapement - a Welch Spring & Co. The wheel has some wear but it is a strong runner and one of the best timekeepers in my collection. The main problem I see is the issue of replacing the escape wheel if it becomes damaged or badly worn. And of course recognizing it for what it is when adjusting it.

RC
I have one Welch clock (among others in my collection) that has a club foot escapement, too. Apparently Welch was the only maker with this particular design. However, in my experience, Welch movements seem to be like the modern Energizer bunny - they keep on ticking even if the end bushings have a tremendous amount of wear or play in them, enough to stop movements that were made by other makers of that era.

OTOH, once Sessions bought up what was left of Welch's manufacture, what they churned out was a different story.
 

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