• Upcoming updates
    Over the next couple of weeks we will be performing software updates on the forum. These will be completed in small steps as we upgrade individual software addons. You might occasionally see a maintenance message that will last a few minutes at most.

    If we anticipate an update will take more than a few minutes, we'll put up a notice with estimated time.

    Thank you!

Clocks with nails

mlempenau

New User
Oct 8, 2021
4
0
1
71
Country
I'm trying to date my clock. When did clocks with glass stop holding in the glass with nails? This clock is amazing. It keeps perfect time.

wallclock.jpg clocknails.jpg
 

Tim Orr

NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Member
Donor
Sep 27, 2008
1,932
429
83
Boulder CO
Country
Region
Good afternoon!

Others probably know more than I do, but I would guess that the glass has been replaced, perhaps as a result of breakage. It is difficult for me to imagine a careful worker or designer using plain nails to hold in place a large piece of glass. What I think is much more likely is that either putty was used (you should probably be able to find remnants of that), as is often the case in window glass panes, or that a flexible strip of wood or some other material was formed around the inside of the glass, then secured in place by nails. Such nails would not have been finishing nails, but nails with heads on them.

Using nails – even finishing nails – to directly hold in glass seems to me like bad practice. Also, the edge of your glass, especially on the right of the photo, shows evidence that it was cut and fitted by a somewhat inexperienced worker. A nice piece of flexible wood strip or of caulk would conceal those irregularities.

Accordingly, I wouldn't feel comfortable using the nails as a gauge of age. Pictures of the works might elicit better ideas. Meanwhile, it is very good to hear that your clock is such a good timekeeper.

Is the wood solid or veneer? Older clocks almost always used veneer to save money. What is the size of the winding squares? They look rather large. How long does the clock run between windings?

Best regards!

Tim Orr
 

mlempenau

New User
Oct 8, 2021
4
0
1
71
Country
I see no veneer. All wood seems to be solid. About 3/8". The winding squares are 1/8". It is a seven day clock. The timing spring has lost some of it's spring. It now lasts about 6 days. The chime spring still seems to be good altho I wind the two together. Since the clock is running so good right now I don't want to mess with it. Maybe the hinge and door latch might give an indication of age. I have attached pics.

clockdoorhinge.jpg clockdoorlatch.jpg
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
18,022
3,490
113
Springs are rarely the issue. You clock is probably about 40 years past due for a take apart service/overhaul. :rolleyes: Willie X
 

new2clocks

NAWCC Member
Apr 25, 2005
4,681
969
113
Pennsylvania
Country
Region
Welcome to the forum.

We may be able to date your clock if you show us a picture of the back of the movement (or "works" as Tim said).

Otherwise, we are just providing guesses.

Regards.
 

mlempenau

New User
Oct 8, 2021
4
0
1
71
Country
Willie X: Your comment is well taken. I will be considering my next move.

I'm not excited about taking the movement out to take a pic. Maybe after Christmas I will be more open to it. Right now I think it's probably around 100 years old. It continues to amaze me at how accurate it is. It veries between 15 sec fast and 15 sec slow. Right now for the last few days it has been 5 sec fast.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
178,995
Messages
1,570,052
Members
54,043
Latest member
nrizzo
Encyclopedia Pages
909
Total wiki contributions
3,088
Last edit
Swiss Fake by Kent