Clocks hate me

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by bangster, Jun 3, 2018.

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  1. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    This is that Marble Clock you had questions about a short while ago bangster? As I recall there was a member who obviously had experience with this type of clock. Maybe you could PM that person for suggestions? A screw grabber or small mechanic's pick-up tool might help you get the screws in place and started. Something like this maybe?
    Timesavers sells this:which is probably smaller, but not as long. I have a tool similar to the Timesavers example and have found it to be a very useful to have on hand.
    Good luck and congrats on getting the movement up and running! :clap:
     
  2. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    I had to do something similar not long ago. I made guide screws out of 2-56 threaded rod. Well-stocked hobby shops should have this and similarly-tiny sizes.

    M Kinsler
     
  3. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    I'm not familiar with a 'guide screw' approach. The screw/nut holder has always worked well for me although there are some situations where it's kind of short. Perhaps "guide screws" would work better in such situations? Antique clocks sometimes have odd thread pitches and just finding replacement screws can be a time consuming search.

    If you have the time, I hope you'll post a few photos of your project in its various stages to completion bangster. Your photo of the spring set up with the minute arbor in place immediately summed up and illustrated the set up. Something that took me numerous posts to describe adequately. :thumb:
     
  4. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    I HAVE CONQUERED! THE sumbidge, er, LITTLE DARLIN' IS TOGETHER AND RUNNIN'! :):clap::nutjob::emoji_sunglasses::emoji_v::Party:

    And not through any stratagems involving guide screws or whatnot, but solely due to my own skill and stubbornness. (Crowd cheers here.)

    I haven't fully described the perils involved in getting the littlle darlin's movement installed back in the boat-anchor stone case. First, it has to go in through the bottom with the case lying on its back. Second, there are three seriously disconnected factors that need to be aligned together: the threaded holes in the movement tabs, the screw holes in the bezel, and the notches in the round hole in the front panel to accommodate the bezel screws.

    The panel notches are fixed, but the other two have no indexed points relative to them. First, you gotta hold the movement up against the back of the front panel so's the holes align with the notches and try to keep it there. Second, you gotta get the bezel set on top so' its holes align with the threaded holes and try to keep it there.
    Third, you gotta do this when you can't see the threaded holes once the bezel is in place, And fourth, both the movement and bezel like to move around while you're trying to get all three factors working together, since there is no indexed structure. They just slide around on the slick marble surface.

    Thus, after many a try, I managed to get the movement held still long enough to put the bezel up and poke a pointed hole finder down through bezel, and past notch, and into threaded hole! Carefully, I threaded in the first screw...and the rest is a history of fighting the other screws into their holes for another 45 minutes or so. And 'twas done. Except for tweaking.

    I couldn't have done it without your support, so I express my bosom thanks to you all...

    I may post some pics...

    bangster
     
  5. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    Well, this clock still Hates Me. Now it's a rate problem.

    The dang thing keeps gaining and gaining, and I keep lowering and lowering until the pendulum drags on the bottom panel.
    Fortunately, the way this thing is cobbled together, it's possible to lower the bottom.

    Recall that on this one, access is through the bottom. The panel is held on by 4 nuts on threaded screws. The threading goes a long ways along the rods, so there are inner stop nuts on it that determine how far in (up) the panel can go. By lowering the stop nuts, I can lower the bottom panel.

    'Cept when I do that, the screws no longer protrude thru the panel far enough to get a nut on.

    My approach was to take a Forstner bit and relieve around the screw holes, so's I can get the nuts on.
    And it worked. And the clock kept on gaining. And the pendulum again hit the bottom panel.
    So I took the panel back off and removed some more wood from around the screw holes.
    And it worked. And the clock is running again. But I'm just about at the limit of how much wood I can remove. And there's a limit to how much thread I have to work with,

    And the only way I know to lower the rate is to lower the bob. So if it's still gaining until the pendulum drags again, What do you suggest I try next?:banghead:
     
  6. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    You shouldn't have to alter the floor/sounding board. How much time are you gaining in a 24 hour period? Did you replace or alter the suspension spring?
     
  7. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Or maybe the escape wheel is skipping a tooth?

    Uhralt
     
  8. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    I know I shouldn't, but there is is. At first it was about an hour. Finally got it down to 10 min a day. "No" on suspension spring.

    Visible escapement. No skip that I can observe.

    (sigh)
     
  9. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    A wheel or a pinion that is loose on the arbor and can slip?
    Uhralt
     
  10. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    Put a beat amplifier on it if you've got one and listen to it for a few hours while you do other chores. My first guess would be an occasional skipping tooth, but I agree that a Brocot probably couldn't do that.

    Look to see if something has somehow raised the center of mass of the pendulum bob. As always, do not assume that the parts you have are correct, for someone may have switched a pendulum bob or an entire pendulum, as is often the quaint custom of antique dealers. And check to see if the hands are secure.

    Please keep us informed as to your progress, as Providence has clearly granted you this clock to educate the rest of us.

    M Kinsler

    and also to build your character
     
  11. Dick Feldman

    Dick Feldman Registered User

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    Back to the basics, OK?
    If the hands are moving too fast, the escape wheel is rotating too fast.
    When you find why the escape wheel is moving too fast, you will find your solution.
    I assume the clock has the original pendulum, the original movement, the original everything.
    If the clock once kept time with all its own junk, it should again keep time.
    I believe you are up the wrong tree. You are trying to cure the symptoms, not the problem.
    After you remove that movement from the case a couple of dozen times, you will be the resident expert.
    Don’t despair; you are going to make it.

    Dick
     
  12. PatH

    PatH Registered User
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    Possibly need a thinner suspension spring to increase the arc rather than lowering the bob?

    Hang in there. As Mr Kinsler said, we're all learning from your experiences and the possibilities suggested.
     
  13. Time After Time

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    #113 Time After Time, Jul 7, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2018
    Okay, so out of frustration, you are altering the clock or forcing the issue. I understand, but that seldom ends well. Did the time mainspring strike you as being pretty "stout" when you were servicing the movement? Are the springs barreled?

    Something has changed from the original clock. As I recall, I've yet to run across an Ansonia clock in which the pendulum closely approaches the floor of the case, with the exception of a Crystal Regulator and those are pretty much locked in vertically by the rod length. Is the regulator assembly in good operating condition? The pendulum's unique rating nut set up is just one of two ways to regulate these movements? I know it's "obvious" but it really isn't always, especially if you don't have much experience with these kinds of movements. It may have come to you assembled out of "whack".

    As I recall, there was one troublesome tooth on the EW which was causing problems when you had a depth issue with the EW and Verge. Did you ever alter its profile? Could it still be causing an occasional fault?

    That's what I was thinking. I just jumped in at the beginning to get the ball rolling so to speak. It would have to be a pretty thick spring though to have the movement running an hour fast every day. I suppose it's possible.
     
  14. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    I think that at this point it might be useful to take some pictures of the pendulum hanging at the rear of the movement, the escapement, and whatever else might seem pertinent. Someone here, probably not me, may notice something that doesn't look right.

    I once had a particularly stubborn grandfather clock movement whose pendulum leader I was about to remanufacture until at length I discovered I'd installed its pendulum suspension post assembly upside-down.

    M Kinsler
     
  15. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    Dick is right I've been working on the symptoms, not the cause. Let's start over.

    Start with the premise that at one time the clock ran properly.

    1. Hands turning too fast because EW turning too fast.
    2a. EW turning too fast because pendulum wagging too fast.
    Solution: Slow down pendulum by lowering bob.
    Can't lower bob enough to do the job because it hits the floor.
    Solution: Lower the floor. Incredibly ingenious, but
    WRONG. It ran before without lowering the floor.

    2b. Suspension spring has shrunk.
    UNLIKELY. They don't do that.

    2c. Brocot adjuster set up wrong.
    WRONG. Not enough travel in the adjuster to account for the problem.

    2d. EW turning too fast not because of pendulum wag.
    MAYBE…

    3a. Ew turning too fast because skipping teeth.
    WRONG. Visible escapements shows no skipping.

    4a. EW turning too fast for some other reason.
    Candidates:
    5. Slipping gears in the train. WRONG, that would slow rather than speed EW.
    6. Going train assembled incorrectly. WRONG; it only goes together one way.
    7. When I had it out, I did something to it to make it run fast.
    POSSIBLY. But I don't know what it might be. If I were to set out deliberately to
    make it run faster than it should, I wouldn't know where to start.

    Didn't think about motion works. Any way they could speed up the hands
    without the EW?
    DON'T THINK SO

    Next candidate?

    :glasses:
     
  16. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    The assumption that the escape wheel must be turning too fast is wrong. It may be turning too fast but maybe not. Consider this theoretical scenario: The escape wheel stops completely with every beat but the movement not, because somewhere a gear is slipping causing the train not to be stopped when the escape wheel stops. It still gets power from the main spring and would run like crazy if the escape wheel wouldn't stop it. To test the hypothesis you could stop the pendulum and put a little finger pressure on the wheel driving the minute hand. Do the hands move? If they do something is slipping and you will be able to see where.

    Uhralt
     
  17. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    One further thought.

    I worked on one of these, and hope to never see another (but a crystal regulator just came in anyway.) On the version I had the plates were drilled such that you could use them with either a Brocot front escapement or with a conventional escapement. Thus it's possible to assemble this clock incorrectly, which is what I did, even to the extent of re-bushing the wrong holes. In my case, I had the time train set up nicely, but not connected to the escape wheel, and though your escape wheel clearly gets power, I wonder if something else might have been placed incorrectly.

    M Kinsler
     
  18. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    The hypothesis that this clock once ran, is suspect. It's clearly a marriage, and a poorly cobbled together one. I think it's a one-off that somebody built; Ansonia isn't known for shoddy work. I'll ask the owner, before delving further.

    But uhralt has an interesting alternative: if the motion work is running faster than the EW, due to slippage, it will be running the hands faster even though the EW is at correct speed.

    You guys are going to make me take the movement back out of the case, aren't you? And eventually put it back in. :mallet:
     
  19. RJSoftware

    RJSoftware Registered User

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    hmmm, wrong ew. not enough teeth...
     
  20. G J M

    G J M Registered User

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    Hello everyone,

    May be more of a question than help to the rating problem. Is there a "sweet spot" as far as where the bob is on the pendulum and once it is passed any other adjustments are for naught?


    Saw it once before. Just a thought from :?|
    G
     
  21. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    G J M likes this.
  22. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    Okay, well let's return to the escapement depth problem. RC cited Conover in post #37 suggesting that perhaps you re-installed the Verge Bridge upside down after working on the Strike MS Problem. I independently came to that possible conclusion also. You fixed the catching EW Tooth problem by bending the bridge up a little (#42). If the problem was that you re-installed the bridge upside down, and then bent it up the thing up "just the tiniest bit", perhaps you increased the depth enough to get past the slightly deformed tooth which was causing you problems, but not enough to get the Escapement working at its optimum design....or as RC stated, if you've adjusted the depth of your Escapement to allow one misshapened tooth to pass through the pallets, perhaps the other normally shaped teeth are zipping right through. Again, your problem may have arisen by you treating the symptom and not the cause. Perhaps not.

    Also, it's been suggested several times that your suspension spring may be too strong resulting in a shallow pendulum swing. Is that possible, or have you dismissed it as another "Wrong" answer or did I just miss your response?

    Obviously, we don't have answers, just suggestions for you to consider.

    Your regulator suspension looks like it moves the suspension spring up and down through the chops. It should determine the effective length of the pendulum rod and the adjustable bob raises or lowers the center of gravity. Unless you have the Bob hanging off the end of the Rod, it shouldn't even be able to touch the floor of the case. If it does, you probably have a replacement bob on the clock.

    As far as making you take the movement back out of the case, no, we're not going to make you do that but the movement might. :chuckling:

    I'll be watching with great anticipation to see what you finally come up with as a solution to the problem.

    Good luck.
     
  23. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    THE PLOT THICKENS!

    BANGSTER SPEAKS:
    I'm having a devil of a time getting this clock regulated, so tell me this:
    Did this clock run at one time? Have you actually seen it run?

    =================

    THE OWNER SPEAKS
    mr. tapscott,
    good morning...i have never seen it in working condition...

    my father's response to your query is attached. i was not home when it went on the dresser in my BR.

    thanks,

    ===========

    THE OWNER'S FATHER SPEAKS
    That clock was in the guest room in Raleigh for years and moved to 106 when mama moved to Wmsbg, where it went on the dresser in your BR. it never ran well after move to 104. It is/was a temperamental beast because it took grandpa Graves to get it going, sometime in the fifties, before coming back to Raleigh, probably the Fairview Rd. home after his passing in ‘68. The problem I encoutered with it at 106 was keeping it running, which I attributed to a need for cleaning and lubrication. The mantle clock now at 106 is also in need of service.
    ===========

    We now have some information we didn't have before.
     
  24. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    If you can see one plate, look closely to see if there are any unoccupied pivot holes on the time side. If so, this may indicate that you have a movement adaptable for both Brocot and conventional escapements. The regulation difficulties my lie there.

    It was my experience with these that the pendulum arc is disturbingly small. Is that the case with your clock?

    Mark Kinsler
     
  25. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    #125 bangster, Jul 8, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2018
    The movement is back out of the case and on the test stand, where I can get at it. Stay tuned.
     
  26. Dick Feldman

    Dick Feldman Registered User

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    #126 Dick Feldman, Jul 9, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2018
    Ho Bangs,
    Here is a little exercise you can do while you watch that movement run on a stand.
    I hope you have a meter that registers BPH. If not, you can disregard this and move on.
    1. Set your beat measurer for 60 beats or something bigger.
    2. Take about 10 readings, divide by 10 (or whatever) to get a nice round average for BPH. Try to avoid the warn, striking, etc as that will throw off your readings.
    3. Note the time of day.
    4. Set the clock hands to the time of day.
    5. Write down the time from the clock hands
    6. Write down the time it really is.
    7. Go away for about 10-12 hours, maybe 15, maybe 24..
    8. Calculate the number of minutes that have lapsed according to the clock hands when you come back.
    9. Calculate the number of minutes that have elapsed according to real time when you come back.
    10. Divide the number of actual elapsed minutes by the number of minutes elapsed according to the clock hands.
    11. If the number of clock minutes is more than the number of actual minutes (running fast), the answer to your division problem will be a number greater than 1.
    12. Divide the number of beats per hour that you measured a few hours ago by the answer to your division problem in #10 above.
    13. The answer to the division in #12 will be the number of beats the clock should run to keep correct time.
    14. Lengthen the pendulum till your reach that BPH in #13.
    15. Measure the distance from the hand shaft hole (center) in the clock case to the bottom case floor.
    16. Measure the distance from the center of the movement center shaft to the bottom of the pendulum to see if there will be room in the case.
    17. If the pendulum length with the clock movement keeping fair time is longer than the case will accommodate, you are screwed. Maybe you can cut a slot in the bottom of the case and let the pendulum hang out the bottom?
    Something else you might try is to take BPH measurements every ½ to ¾ hour to see if the number is similar. If the escapement is actually jumping over teeth, the BPH will not necessarily be consistent and your readings will not be similar.
    18. Report back
    Dick
     
  27. tom427cid

    tom427cid Registered User
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    This is a wonderful thread, it is highlighting many of the issues that one encounters during their daily adventures in horology. That said, I am surprised that no one has mentioned the obvious answer. If you believe the clock hates you-----------hate it back It has worked wonders for me!
    On a more serious note , while the movement is on the test stand adjust the rate so it keeps time-then compare to how much room is available in the case. I had a similar problem with a ST #1 extra movement in a #1 case, it ran to fast and could not be slowed down. Finally figured out what was going on.
    Here's a thought IF the pend drop is to great for the case and parts are not available to correct the problem, consider compounding the pendulum. Might work.
    Just a thought, good luck and a quick solution.
    tom
     
  28. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    Dick: Thanks for the detailed instructions. Alas! I lack such a meter. I'm leaning toward your #17.
    Tom: I'm thinking along the same lines. Lower the bob until it keeps correct time, then measure stuff.
    Trying to compound it would be more work than it's worth.
     
  29. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    Try a thinner suspension spring and/or try to remove weight from the pendulum bob in order to increase the pendulum arc.
     
  30. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    In a recent email, the owner clarified: In the earlier email they were thinking of a different clock. This one has not ever been seen to run.:excited:
     
  31. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    Knowing the clock the way you do, what does this new piece of information suggest to you bangster? It might have been nice to have that bit of information a little earlier, huh? It still wouldn't have changed the facts though.

    Do you have reason to doubt the originality of the movement and/or pendulum? I went back to post #1 and looked at your links. The movement, dial and pendulum all look appropriate to me. I see that the sound board has been factory modified at the bottom to make room for a low hanging pendulum so it doesn't look like there is a lot of room for rate error correction. Based on what I've read and what little I can see, I'm still inclined to think that your pendulum arc is too shallow. What do you think?

    I suppose you could completely cut out the "carved" area in the sound board (similar to some Ingraham Mantels) to make room for a longer pendulum bob drop if your test stand measurements indicate that would solve the problem. I really don't like that idea and would consider it a last, desperate measure to get the movement regulated.

    Assuming everything is original to the case....

    What are you going to do?

    Regards
     
  32. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    OK fellers, time to re-think the whole proposition

    I have lowered the pendulum bob as far as it will go, and lowered the adjuster as far as it will go, and it still seems to be gaining slightly. I no longer believe the rating problem is a pendulum issue. At least, not this pendulum. A longer one might solve the rate problem, but not the clock problem: Impossible to run in this handsome marble case with longer pendulum.

    This clock is a marriage made in hell. I don't think it came from Ansonia.Somebody had a French marble case and an Ansonia movement, and decided to cobble them together. And after doing all that work, he found that he couldn't get it to run, so he abandoned it. No idea where the present owner got it.

    Is there some part that could be replaced to let this clock run at a slower rate with this same pendulum?

    Here's a pic of the pendulum.You can see from the shiny part of the stick how much it's been lowered.

    Stony pendulum.jpg
     
  33. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    It's time to count the teeth of the appropriate wheels (there are posts here to tell you which ones) and calculate the beat rate (beats per hour, e.g.) and then the correct pendulum length for such a clock. The formulas are easy, or someone here (me, even) can work them through for you. See how that final result compares to your pendulum's length.

    That movement was meant to run, and I'd be surprised if the pendulum needed to be long. At least I've never seen a Brocot escapement in anything but a mantel clock.

    M Kinsler
     
  34. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    Sure looks like the Ansonia "El Arditi" from circa 1904 to me bangster. Others should verify. TDL's Ansonia Clocks and Watches page 311 clock 1169.

    I don't know if it is possible to get gearing mixed up between the trains. I kind of doubt it. Can we see the Escapement in action? Is the pendulum arc very shallow?
     
  35. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    Maybe it is an Ansonia. But something has happened in its innards somewhere to make it misbehave.
    No, of course it shouldn't have to have its bob cranked all the way to the bottom. Ergo my conclusion the the beat problem isn't a pendulum problem; trouble lies elsewhere.

    Count teeth? You mean, like, take it apart and everything? After I finally got it running? :(
     
  36. RJSoftware

    RJSoftware Registered User

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    easier way is to use ew with a couple more teeth. Use old arbor if u have to.
     
  37. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    How wide is your pendulum swing bangster? Can we see a short video of the escapement and pendulum swing? If the swing is short, or shallow, the clock will run fast, as is the case with a balance wheel.
     
  38. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    If it's an Ansonia original,then certainly it ran, and ran well, once upon a time. But I have no idea when that might have been. Here's what I know: The owner brought it to me and said it wouldn't run, but not much else. Fair enough; I know how to make 'em run. But now I know that it's not a family heirloom and has never been known to run during the time the owner has known it.

    The pendulum is the right length for the case. No reason to think it's not original.
     
  39. Dick Feldman

    Dick Feldman Registered User

    Sep 1, 2000
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    Bangs,

    If you are intent on putting that movement in that case, you have an option. (Call it another ingenious repair). The key is to add a secondary pendulum with weight above the existing pivot point. Adjustment of that new weight may be exactly opposite of the original bob... (Longer for shorter duration/faster hands and shorter for longer duration/slower hands.) The Tinker, however said adding a secondary pendulum may reverse the adjustment on the original bottom bob.
    The following link is about wooden clocks and their pendulums, but a clock is a clock and a pendulum is a pendulum.
    Wooden Clocks: Compound Pendulum
    Here is another link from this board:
    Designing and regulating a compound pendulum
    There are calculations for the addition, but most would require knowing the original period of the pendulum and the resultant period (BPH).after the addition of the additional bob.
    I think, with a little fiddling, one could come up with an addition to the existing pendulum and make the clock movement run sweetly in that case.
    I beleive you are beyond the point that originality is of paramount importance.
    It depends how much more time you want to spend with that bugger.

    Best of luck,

    Dick
     
  40. shutterbug

    shutterbug Super Moderator
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    I'm thinking increase the lock to max and get the thinnest suspension spring you can find. Then re-asses where you are. Perhaps a pic of the case would aid in IDing whether it's Ansonia or not.
     
  41. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    Thanks, Dick. I know all about compound pendulums SEE HERE.
    Problem is how to do it in this case. Solder an outrigger wire to the suspension rod, add a weight above the suspension post? There are members of this MB who would cringe at the thought of such a bodge.

    Besides, it would be treating the symptom rather than the cause.:D

    Shutt: For pic see link in post #1 wa-ay up there.
     
  42. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    But if all else fails, I might give it a try. o_O

    Just about.
     
  43. tom427cid

    tom427cid Registered User
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    Bang.
    Quick question, What is the maximum dimension for length you can accept for a pend length?
    Let me know and I will look in the drawer-might have a movement.
    tom
     
  44. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    I wonder if any remnants of movement-mounting screw holes might help establish that the present movement is not the original.

    Mark Kinsler
     
  45. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    Sent you PM.
    Thanks.
     
  46. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    There never were mounting screw holes. This marble movement was designed for a French roulant, secured by metal straps from the front bezel to a rim at the back. Both front and rear holes started out perfectly round. To allow for the mounting screws on this movement, they chiseled out notches in the front opening. Mvt held in now with screws thru bezel and into threaded holes in tabs on mvt.
     
  47. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    THE SPIRIT OF RUBE GOLDBERG LIVES!

    Pics of suspension with compound weight outrigger, And movement with the contraption in place.
    Incredibly ingenious, or what?:coolsign:

    RG part.jpg RG movement.jpg

    Unfortunately, I couldn't find out whether it would work. Just after I took the picture, the movement tipped over and busted the feather.
    I'll have to make another one. (No, I didn't modify the original suspension.. How dumb do I look? :emoji_ghost:)
     
  48. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    It is SB. See post 134. That doesn't mean that the movement is original to the case, but this does appear to be an "all Ansonia" clock.

    If I had one of these movements handy, I would experiment to see if Time and Strike Gears might be interchanges by accident. Perhaps T-2 and S-2. I seriously doubt it's possible, and I seriously doubt bangster would make the mistake if it were possible. It just sounds like some type of ratio error. Outside of that, I again would check the escapement settings and suspension spring thickness as SB has mentioned I've suggested it so often, I can only assume that bangster has looked at it and dismissed it as a possibility. I would start with the escapement since there was an issue with it early on.

    I do have a figural "Mercury" that needs servicing, I may put that on my short list of clocks to do just to look at it with this type of issue in mind. Alternatively, maybe a fresh set of eyes is indicated.

    Sounds as though we're going to go with a Compound Pendulum approach. Looks reversible and if it works, well, why not?

    Good luck with it bangster. Glad to hear that the movement wasn't damaged in the fall...after all you've been through with it.
     
  49. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    Compound Pendulum is absolute last resort. As I said, it's treating the symptom instead of the cause.

    I suppose I'll capture the springs and look at its innards. But I don't expect to find anything.
     
  50. RJSoftware

    RJSoftware Registered User

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    Pretty soon somebody will coin the repairs as:

    Bangsterized
    All Banged up.
    Pulled a Bangster.
    Bangster rigged
    That was Banged, for sure
    Man, I never seen a Bang like that before
    Someone was Bang trippin
    Ah jeese, Bang
    Dang Bang...!

    :)
    Rj
     

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