• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Clockmakers Hall of Shame

Bruce Alexander

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I would tend to agree with you RC. There is some type of bushing or tubing within the cracked/soldered bushing. There doesn't appear to be abnormal wear to the bushing and apparently not on the pivot either (or Billy would have noticed), so considering the time and effort required to remove and clean up what's there, fab and place a new bushing (for a customer's clock) it is probably best to leave it as is. It's a far cry from the re-purposed brass gear teeth/rathbun bushings that he has replaced.
 

shutterbug

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Those things tend to screw in and out when you don't want them to, so maybe the solder was just to lock it in place.
 

R&A

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Well if this bushing left score marks on the pivot and isn't replaced . It will continue to do so. Plus if you polished the pivot then it would be smaller than before. There for you would have more noticeable wear. Kind of defeating the purpose without doing both the polishing and the bushing.
 

Bruce Alexander

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I think the OP was talking about scored pivots in the Time Train. If you haven't seen the "bushings" in question go back to his before photos. The discussion has lately centered on S-1 but that wasn't presented as the main area of concern. I'm assuming that pivot wasn't scored (any more than "normal") but I could be wrong.
 

R&A

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I think the OP was talking about scored pivots in the Time Train. If you haven't seen the "bushings" in question go back to his before photos. The discussion has lately centered on S-1 but that wasn't presented as the main area of concern. I'm assuming that pivot wasn't scored (any more than "normal") but I could be wrong.
This is what he posted

icon1.png Re: Clockmakers Hall of Shame (By: PatH)

The pivots just had some mild scoring, which cleaned up when I polished them.

This is where I got it from​
 

Bruce Alexander

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This is what he posted

icon1.png Re: Clockmakers Hall of Shame (By: PatH)

The pivots just had some mild scoring, which cleaned up when I polished them.

This is where I got it from​
I know where it came from friend. He was responding to my question and my question was about the pivots he had re-bushed. (See photo from Post Number 1586, gears T-1B, T-2B & T-3B?). I could be wrong but I don't think he was talking about the S-1 Pivot.

Pivots had some scoring, not bad, dressed them out. Removed previous "repair", cleaned plate and rebushed. Movement is ticking away quietly now.
The question got repeated in #1599 and the OP repeated the answer in #1600, which is what you are quoting

 
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kinsler33

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That's a screw-in bushing and they are a pain. You almost have to bush inside them (and hope they don't move).
I once encountered a screw-in bushing that kept un-screwing as I was reaming a hole in it for a real bushing. Red Loc-tite didn't help much and looked horrible. After more experimentation than should have been necessary, I finally took the plate over to visit Mr Hammer. Positioning the screw-in bushing atop a tiny anvil (actually the head of a cold chisel clamped in the vise) I applied several scientifically-placed clops to said bushing, which expanded out and thus locked in place.

I agree that the winding arbor pivot isn't attractive here, but it's tough to grow new brass. The OP did a good job of getting rid of the worst of the solder.

M Kinsler
 

Bruce Alexander

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I once encountered a screw-in bushing that kept un-screwing as I was reaming a hole in it for a real bushing. Red Loc-tite didn't help much and looked horrible. After more experimentation than should have been necessary, I finally took the plate over to visit Mr Hammer. Positioning the screw-in bushing atop a tiny anvil (actually the head of a cold chisel clamped in the vise) I applied several scientifically-placed clops to said bushing, which expanded out and thus locked in place.

I agree that the winding arbor pivot isn't attractive here, but it's tough to grow new brass. The OP did a good job of getting rid of the worst of the solder.

M Kinsler
That doesn't sound like a bad way to approach the problem, especially if the owner doesn't want to pay you to make it "disappear". They can also be staked to the plate which is a method used by manufacturers. I almost wish I had not asked the OP for "after" photos now. I think he did a very nice job but it seems as though folks are more focused on, and critical of, what he didn't do on S-1. Perhaps not, just seems that way to me.
 

Billy

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Just for the record, because of all the discussion, I did opt to leave the strike side alone because even as ugly as it looks, it is a functioning bushing. There was no slop, the pivot had no scoring and the countwheel is involved. I just did not feel it was worth the effort, in this case, to remove the ugly, just to make it pretty.
The saw tooth bushings on the time train, however, had finally failed and stopped the clock. Those had to be repaired to get it back to a running clock. Which by the way, is still ticking sweetly away.

And really, How many times have you heard from a customer, "That much? Anything you can do to lower the cost?".
Yeah, I can use these special saw tooth bushings. They'll last 20 years or so and I can knock a third of the price off. "Do it". And this is how we end up here.:chuckling:

Billy
 

shutterbug

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If you're the last one to handle the movement, the repair will be attributed to you. Not good for the reputation ;)
 

R&A

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That doesn't sound like a bad way to approach the problem, especially if the owner doesn't want to pay you to make it "disappear". They can also be staked to the plate which is a method used by manufacturers. I almost wish I had not asked the OP for "after" photos now. I think he did a very nice job but it seems as though folks are more focused on, and critical of, what he didn't do on S-1. Perhaps not, just seems that way to me.
I don't know about you per say. But I do this full time. My opinion reflects on how a repair will be looked at in the future, as to my reputation. I would rather tell you what I would do. Than to tell you nothing at all. Funny how we don't know what a guy has as far as tool and equipment. Go through a lengthy instruction on set up approach. And then find out that the poor guy doesn't even have a screw driver. So on that note. I have no Idea what the intention is for this fix. All I'm trying to do is my best to help.
 

Bruce Alexander

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I don't know about you per say. But I do this full time. My opinion reflects on how a repair will be looked at in the future, as to my reputation. I would rather tell you what I would do. Than to tell you nothing at all. Funny how we don't know what a guy has as far as tool and equipment. Go through a lengthy instruction on set up approach. And then find out that the poor guy doesn't even have a screw driver. So on that note. I have no Idea what the intention is for this fix. All I'm trying to do is my best to help.
The circumstances were stated and re-stated/clarified by the OP for our benefit. I don't know about you "per say", but not too many people who are in business can afford to fix a cosmetic issue without charging the customer for their time. If the customer doesn't want to pay for a cosmetic repair/restoration, and if the repairer honestly doesn't think it is necessary, who is the professional? There was no functional reason to replace the bushing. The customer was informed about it and a photo was taken to document and show the owner of the clock. What more do you want? I'm starting to understand members who disagree so strongly with the judgmental aspects of this thread. If the clock is yours, do what you want to with it. If you're getting paid, educate your customer and do what they pay you to do. If you want to donate your time for the "greater good" of clocks, knock yourself out. I'm done on this particular posting and possibly with the thread.
 

shutterbug

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I think I was confused on which movement we were discussing. I was thinking it was the one with the gear parts for bushings. Sorry! :glasses:
 

Dave T

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Haven't seen this one before. But looks like it's doing it's job! How to use your old clock hands!
Waterbury fly 3.jpg
 

shutterbug

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Hmmmm. Adding weight or increasing tension?
 

R&A

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The added weight would slow the fan to slow the strike down Look and see what size spring the clock has.
 

Uhralt

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The added weight would slow the fan to slow the strike down Look and see what size spring the clock has.
The added weight should slow down the strike only initially. When the acceleration period is over, the speed would be the same as without the weights. Of course, when the strike stop,s there will be a harder stop impact than intended.

Uhralt
 

Dave T

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I haven't measured the springs, but they "feel" considerably stronger than similar clocks when winding, and difficult to let down to allow cleaning. I did run the clock for a few hours before teardown, and the strike sounded normal to me, without considering or knowing about this fix. And I might as well admit it here. I didn't wear gloves to let down the spring and I have a nice little bruise/cut on my thumb to prove it!
I've found this clock to be the Waterbury "Bedford" model, ca. 1903. And I have yet to find out what spring it should have, in case someone might have that info handy.
 

shutterbug

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Here's one that just came in. Interesting solution to a loose hand :)

IMG_4439.JPG
 

RJSoftware

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grind it smooth, no problemo
 

shutterbug

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It's on an old mission clock, and who knows how old the repair is. It's relatively invisible on the clock, it works, and I figure it's part of the clock's history now. I'm inclined to ignore it.
 
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David S

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One of the things that give solder such a bad name is that so many who try simply don't know how to.

RC
Yes agreed and original manufacturing is often conflated with repair which is totally different.

And as SB says it sure doesn't look all that bad to me. I have often used press fit caps without solder rather than mutilate the shroud.

David
 

Dick Feldman

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I am not one to complain (tongue in cheek) but this one got to me. It is a Herschede movement from a tambour. Nothing special except it has a modified blind man’s strike. It strikes bim bam at each quarter. It strikes one bim bam on the quarter, two at the half and three at quarter till. On the hour it only counts with one gong rod. This is done with two racks, two snails with the racks operating on the same gathering pallet, the same pivot and the same detent and symotaneously. I have seen a couple of these before and these are a nightmare to set up when all is well. The second hammer strike is omitted on the hour with a system similar to passing strike holding the hammer in the air. At the low number strikes, there is a mechanism that flicks the small (quarter hour) rack away and allows the strike rack to take over. It seems there is enough time between episodes that I have to relearn how the system works and what does what every time.
This particular movement has been abused with a previous repair. The pivot hole on the gathering pallet was so worn that it could not advance either rack successfully. Someone has beat on both racks (peened) expanding the metal to the point that neither would not pass under the gathering pallet. When I first saw the clock, the set screw was missing on the quarter snail and that would just turn on the tube. It had been installed upside down. One rack was flipped over and jammed into the gathering pallet. One strike hammer was broken off at the arbor.
The racks are not pretty, but now are functional. I was not the one that soldered and added teeth. I wonder what happened that teeth could be damaged/broken on a rack. I am at the point where everything works and will need final tweaking.
I have a bundle of hours in this thing and any hope of making any money passed many days ago. Over the years, I have been quite critical about people working on their own clocks and this seems to be a good example. This is strong reinforcement. I suppose the issue really is that people are beyond their capabilities and not who owns what.

So—that is my rant.

Dick
Herschede front #2 2826.JPG Herschede bottom, frt #1 2823.JPG Herschede front #1.JPG
 

Colin Drake

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All this to attach an screw on bushing. Guess he couldn't get a screw in there without taking the thing apart. Funny thing though. Despite the explosive use of flux and solder, the "busing" fell off before I even touched it.
20180901_131633[1].jpg
 

bangster

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I rather like the piece of carpet taped to the alarm clapper up at 1616.:rolleyes:
 

Berry Greene

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Uncle Fix-it School of Short Order Brain Surgery and Clock Repair
On occasion many of us are unfortunate to end up with projects from that most famous of clock tinkers, Uncle Fix-It. Please look at the photos below at his efforts to win the Trifecta. Here we have examples of “wheel cutting”, “depthing corrections” and soldering all part of a single repair it appears. Could we consider this a “tour de force” or just a simple Trifecta of exhibiting ones clock making skills? I would award extra points for use of door screen hardware for the mounting post as well as add more points for solving the problem of overlapping holes in the front plate by using said door hardware on both sides of the plate. I might have to subtract a point or two for tooth form on the wheel however.

However, it is really more than a Trifecta. It has one more surprise for the unwary. The coup de grace is the tooth count itself. Uncle Fix-it created a 47 tooth gear. Not all that easy by hand. And since it mates with a 24 leaf hour shaft pinion it had to make for an interesting calendar over a month’s time…..

The real laugh in this is this actually worked…..the accumulated error over a month’s time was 1/47th X31 or less than 1 day error over a month. Since even a correctly running calendar on these clocks requires correction every Feb as well as every 30 day month, this would not be unusual. The fact the clock would advance the calendar 1/2 hr earlier every day might go unnoticed. So, Uncle Fix-It may have the last laugh on us all.
Oh I enjoyed that read! I think the 47 tooth is another racing/betting term called hedging. Today could be Tuesday - I'll tell you next Saturday if it was. Let's fix a time......shall we? :<))
Sincerely,
BerryG
 

Berry Greene

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Good pics, I see this quite often. I use a magic marker to identify hole and side where the wear is. It comes off during cleaning.

The proud pivots I don't see too often except when a pivot has broken and the arbor turned back to make a new one. A long bushing will be installed to capture the pivot. I agree, this will also create a keyhole when it wears will create more problems.

Keep the pics coming, wish more people had digital cameras, they sure come in handy for pics like this and when working on unusual complicated movements. I had assembly pics on over a hundred movements but lost all in a hard drive crash. :mysad:

Backing up weekly now. :thumb:
 

bruce linde

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This is more of a computer thing then a clock thing, But if you are backing up once a week you could still lose a week’s worth of stuff. Hard drives are cheap, and there are also offsite storage services. I have twin external hard drives. My computer gets backed up to one every night. The other lives in the garage. They get swapped every couple of weeks, just in case.

You can also email your self bunches of photos, which would make yet another back up… Get a free Google mail account for that purpose
 

Berry Greene

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Regarding disk drive crashes. Don't trust to a single disk. While it's true some specialists can do wonderful recoveries - it's far better to back up frequently or even create an immediate "mirror" copy as you go for your precious things. As wonderful as it all is I worry for the future generations access to current history. We would not have thought of film as very rugged but it beats modern video storage by miles. IMHO of course. Even a shellac record ,,,,blah blah - you know what I'm saying don't you?
Regarding all these bodges you're highlighting. Is there any up-side at all? Some clocks might have just been scrapped but for them - yeah? Putting such awful things to rights must bring some satisfaction surely?
BerryG
 

Rockin Ronnie

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Lots of threads on the hall of shame but this looks to be the main one.

This is a Canada Clock Co. "Hamilton Cottage Extra" circa 1880 30-hour time and strike. Levers seem to go everywhere. Helper "string" rather than spring. Both mainsprings have been "modified" (an accident waiting to happen). The hammer is 2 bolts with copper wire wrapped around a connecting shaft.

Everything is fixable, however.

Ron

RS Can Clock movement (1).jpg RS Can Clock movement (12).jpg RS Can Clock movement (15).jpg RS Can Clock movement (20).jpg RS Can Clock movement (21).jpg RS Canada Clock Co (21).jpg RS Canada Clock Co (31).jpg
 
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JimmyOz

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This came into the shop about a year ago, I like how they at least earthed it, I still got a shock....:excited:

Grandqt3.jpg Grandqt4.jpg
 
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Bruce Alexander

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There's been quite a bit of discussion regarding whether or not it is appropriate to use the word "Shame" when referring to anyone's repair work (anonymous or not).
To quote the OP's response to that argument...

Look at it this way. Some of the pics I have of botched jobs were done by clockmakers that has been repairing clocks for many years. (no one I know personally) Hence he should feel shame. :mysad:

It also takes a clockmaker to mend the damage done, its a shame he has to spend extra time to the correct the damage. :bang:

Jerry
Below I'll detail some of my own work so hopefully no one will be offended.

About 20 months ago, I performed a complete overhaul on a Seth Thomas Chime No. 70 for a client.

Recently, it was returned to me with a complaint that it would only run for about a day after winding.

After he shipped it back to me, sure enough, I found that the Pendulum had an anemic swing (for a ST 113), but it ran after a full windup.

It stalled again after a couple of hours. Once I was able to reproduce the owner's description of the issue, I pulled the movement and started my examination.

With the Mainspring's fully wound, the Time Train showed end-shake from the Verge down to the Minute Wheel. Everything from that point down to the Great Wheel was under power.

I noticed quite a bit of gunk in the rear plate pivot hole for T-2. Upon closer examination it became clear to me that there was a wear related depth problem with T-2/T-3 which was responsible for the issue. Rewinding the Gear Train would temporarily free up the gears involved until they fairly quickly bound up again. All of the other pivots still looked pretty clean and well lubricated, by the way.

Fortunately for me, I could remove the Mainspring Barrels on this movement without separating the upper plate (which holds all of the gears and timings). I was also able to tease out T-2 ,without disturbing the rest of the Gear Trains, and noticed that the pivot was in pretty rough shape with a piece of the Shoulder missing.

I had not placed a bushing in the worn pivot hole although it had been previously restored with a Bergeon Bushing. There was quite a bit of scratching on the plate around the pivot hole. I have no idea what that was about. Someone was clearly careless while working around the Pivot Hole.

Here's a photo of the Pivot and Shoulder as found.
Pivot Shoulder Fault.JPG

If you look closely, you'll see where a fragment of the shoulder is missing. I don't recall seeing that when I completed my previous work on the movement, but I suppose it is possible that I over-looked it. I'll take this opportunity to point out that Laurie Penman states on page 49 of his book "The Clock Repairer's Handbook" that
A very large proportion of the friction that is developed in the movement of a clock depends on the design and finish of the pivots and pivot shoulders. Probably up to 60 percent of the total frictional loss in a longcase clock is attributable to friction at the shoulders alone.
While I can't find an instance where Penman calls for the tapering of pivot shoulders with 90 degree angles, it seems to me that all of his illustrations of pivots show pivot shoulders with bevels to reduce their diameter of the arbor at the plate. This in turn would serve to reduce friction and wear at the shoulders. With that in mind, I placed a bevel on the damaged shoulder and refinished the rough pivot.

Pivot Shoulder Resurfacing.JPG

I also got lucky in that the pivot hole was easily accessible so that I was able to use my Sherline Mill to properly center and prep the plate for a new bushing without having to split the upper plate.

Bushing Prep.JPG

I only use and stock KWM Bushings so I prepped the Plate for a KWM bushing with a 3.5mm OD and a 2.7mm ID. Within that Bushing I placed a 2.7 OD bushing with the necessary ID. I used Loctite 680 to insure that the concentric bushings would stay in place as a unit. I also used the retaining compound to ensure that the concentric Bushings will stay firmly in place within the Plate.

After placing the 2.7mm height bushings, I used a round nose end mill to reduce the bushing to plate height (approximately 2.3mm) and to cut a shallow oil sink without sacrificing too much of the Bushing height. This, of course, is important so that the load surface is not reduced too much which would probably accelerate wear of the newly placed Bushing (especially this low in the Gear Train).

The movement has been running on the test stand for five days now and is keeping a very steady rate. I'll finish testing it for a full 8-days and will then reassemble the clock and run another 8-day test before I'll even consider shipping the clock back to its Owner.

"Why Hall of Shame?" you may ask? Well, I don't consider myself to be a Clockmaker, but I aspire to do quality work. I'm not proud of the fact that this movement stalled out after only 20 months. I don't know if a fragment of T-2's shoulder fractured off and fouled the bearing or if I simply overlooked the condition of the shoulder. I know that I need to pay closer attention to Pivot Shoulders. I'll make sure they are polished and beveled if they are wide enough to warrant it, as was the case with this Arbor. It really would have been a shame if I had to completely disassemble this movement to address the problem. How could I justify that expense to the Owner? Sure, it was beyond my 1-year warranty, but not by that much.

I am also glad to have the Mill in my shop as it allowed me to re-center, and prep the plate for a new bushing with confidence. If you're considering an investment in Jerry's Mill approach to bushing plates, I highly recommend it. :thumb:

Also, as has been pointed out numerous times by several Clockmakers here (RC for one as I recall), if substandard work gets by you, it becomes your problem if it fails anytime soon after you've worked on the movement.

I think that this Thread offers an opportunity to learn. It also offers an opportunity for lighthearted fun and commiseration for folks who don't want to let substandard work go through their shop.

As the OP clearly stated, the repairs found here are only a "Shame" if they were done by Clockmakers. If you, or your Dad/Mom, Uncle/Aunt, Grandpa/Grandma or Friend ran a "Fix-It" shop in their basement or garage and got a clock running again, there's no shame in their game unless they're presenting themselves as Clockmakers and charging significant fees for their work. (That's just my opinion of course). It may be a shame that you have to spend twice as much time (or more) reversing amateur efforts in order to do a professional job. Someone is going to have to pay for it.

Have fun folks. Learn and enjoy doing quality work that you're proud of.

Regards,

Bruce
 

Berry Greene

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Thanks for that Bruce. Yes it might not actually be your fault. There could be an "event" After all these things happen all by themselves sometimes! I appreciate entirely the will to do good work. There are no arguments against that. However for the sake of discussion I will just offer a little bit of sympathy as we cannot know the pressures the original repairer was under. With unlimited funds to spend - a splendid job can be done. However, how often does it look futile to overspend? The customer might want an estimate or just puts a limit on what he is prepared to spend. What do you do then? A pro cannot always do it all out of love can he? I think the most comfortable place is when the work is your hobby. Once profit comes into play, time becomes a big consideration. If not for you - then your boss. It spoils the game and you get the blame.
What interesting figures you quote from the Laurie Penman book. Another issue quite apart from skill is of course is tools. Having the right equipment can make such a difference. This, surely, is why there is specialisation.
Very interesting read Mr Alexander. Thank you. Rgds BerryG
 

Bruce Alexander

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A pro cannot always do it all out of love can he?
Hi Berry. Thank you for your kind remarks. I can't answer that question. For me, repairing clocks is an avocation, so I can sometimes afford to ignore a working clock while trying to fix one that is broken. That's why I said that someone will have to pay to reverse an amateur, or substandard repair. If not the clock's owner, then the repairer.

I've got an Ansonia "Sonia No. 1" currently on my bench. The Solder Fairy put in some overtime on this one, and reversing some very consequential "repairs" may be beyond my abilities. I might be reporting on that one, and asking for help here in this Thread or elsewhere on the Message Board.

Regards,

Bruce
 

Berry Greene

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Bruce - There are many people on here who are so generous with their knowledge when you ask them any fool question. You'll get super advice and very little cheek! Since finding this web-site I have gained a lot of confidence and managed more than I ever thought I could or would. I really wish it had been around when I still had better eyesight and wasn't so shaky. I have to pick my moments especially with the wristwatches. There's something special about mechanical time-pieces. They are "alive" - I think its that! I talk to them all and I have few that chime in! I'm looking forward to reading about your exploits.
ATB. BerryG
 

Vernon

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Here is a cute little New England Clock Co. cigar box clock that had some issues. One of the pinned pillars had broke off where the pin inserts and was cut flush. There was also a soldered "bush". The wooden movement mounts needed replaced too. They are nailed through the plate. I elected to leave the new wood natural.

IMG_20190811_094840.jpg IMG_20190606_130817.jpg IMG_20190811_094813.jpg IMG_20190907_104501.jpg IMG_20190907_104508.jpg IMG_20190915_120326.jpg
 

Uhralt

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Here is a cute little New England Clock Co. cigar box clock that had some issues. One of the pinned pillars had broke off where the pin inserts and was cut flush. There was also a soldered "bush". The wooden movement mounts needed replaced too. They are nailed through the plate. I elected to leave the new wood natural.

View attachment 568499 View attachment 568500 View attachment 568501 View attachment 568502 View attachment 568503 View attachment 568504
Great job in unshaming these repairs!

Uhralt
 

Bruce Alexander

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One of the pinned pillars had broke off where the pin inserts and was cut flush.
I can't see that in your photos, or I'm just missing it. Can you please expand on what you found and how you addressed it? Was the Taper Pin cut flush or was it the post? Thanks Vernon.
 

Berry Greene

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Wow Vernon! Those pictures bring new meaning to the term "shame." I am beginning to see what you mean now. That soldering is gross. This thread is an eye opener on depravity! Thanks for the post and good luck with the clean up. BerryG
 

Bruce Alexander

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Nevermind Vernon. I see what you're describing in your 3rd and 4th photos. That really is hard to understand why someone would shear off the top of the post like that. They really chewed up the plate doing it too. Nice job. :cool:
 

Bruce Alexander

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These photos were taken of a Herschede Model 217 9-Tube Tall Case Clock from 1942. I think it's a nice looking clock. Herschede must have sold a lot of these because it's a fairly common model.
Front.jpg

It shows 1.4 mm height bushings in plates which are 3.7 mm thick. That is really a pet-peeve of mine. If you're going to work on movements with thick plates, please use appropriately sized bushings!
Short Bushings.JPG

Judging from the original oil sinks, the Centers may be off a little. We're talking about 14 bushings so the total error could be considerable. The movement does operate and I think that I shouldn't have too much trouble with most of the overhaul. At least I hope that I won't. We'll see.

The problem that I would like opinions on is how to go about reversing the accelerated wear caused by placement of a strong gravity-assist spring on the Chime Train's Gathering Pallet. The spring is not part of the movement's original design and it has caused considerable wear to the pivot hole, and most importantly to the fit of the Gathering Pallet on its squared pivot/arbor.
Post Factory Gravity Assist Spring.jpg
I apologize for the "shaky" video but I think it illustrates the problem.

I'm thinking that I should dress the square hole within the Gathering Pallet, re-pivot the wheel for a tight fit, and then bush the plate. Do any of you have alternative suggestions or cautions against my approach? I won't know the whole story until I get the movement taken apart but I think this is a pretty good indication of what I'm up against.

Many thanks!

Bruce
 

shutterbug

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A recent thread mentioned shimming the square if it's loose. Bushing should take care of the rest. It will be interesting to see if everything works right without the spring. Let us know.
 

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