Clockmakers Hall of Shame

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by Jerry Kenney, Mar 20, 2007.

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  1. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User
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    The piece that holds the count wheel is involved here. Hard to tell what all is going on. Unless a lathe is available and one is prepared to deal with whatever falls out when that bushing is unsoldered, perhaps it is best to leave it alone unless/until one is ready to turn a proper replacement part.

    RC
     
  2. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    I would tend to agree with you RC. There is some type of bushing or tubing within the cracked/soldered bushing. There doesn't appear to be abnormal wear to the bushing and apparently not on the pivot either (or Billy would have noticed), so considering the time and effort required to remove and clean up what's there, fab and place a new bushing (for a customer's clock) it is probably best to leave it as is. It's a far cry from the re-purposed brass gear teeth/rathbun bushings that he has replaced.
     
  3. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Those things tend to screw in and out when you don't want them to, so maybe the solder was just to lock it in place.
     
  4. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    Feb 22, 2010
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    Replacing Screw-In's definitely requires a lathe.
     
  5. R&A

    R&A Registered User

    Oct 21, 2008
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    Well if this bushing left score marks on the pivot and isn't replaced . It will continue to do so. Plus if you polished the pivot then it would be smaller than before. There for you would have more noticeable wear. Kind of defeating the purpose without doing both the polishing and the bushing.
     
  6. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    I think the OP was talking about scored pivots in the Time Train. If you haven't seen the "bushings" in question go back to his before photos. The discussion has lately centered on S-1 but that wasn't presented as the main area of concern. I'm assuming that pivot wasn't scored (any more than "normal") but I could be wrong.
     
  7. R&A

    R&A Registered User

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    This is what he posted

    [​IMG] Re: Clockmakers Hall of Shame (By: PatH)

    The pivots just had some mild scoring, which cleaned up when I polished them.

    This is where I got it from ​
     
  8. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    #1608 Time After Time, Aug 12, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2017
    I know where it came from friend. He was responding to my question and my question was about the pivots he had re-bushed. (See photo from Post Number 1586, gears T-1B, T-2B & T-3B?). I could be wrong but I don't think he was talking about the S-1 Pivot.

    The question got repeated in #1599 and the OP repeated the answer in #1600, which is what you are quoting

     
  9. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    I once encountered a screw-in bushing that kept un-screwing as I was reaming a hole in it for a real bushing. Red Loc-tite didn't help much and looked horrible. After more experimentation than should have been necessary, I finally took the plate over to visit Mr Hammer. Positioning the screw-in bushing atop a tiny anvil (actually the head of a cold chisel clamped in the vise) I applied several scientifically-placed clops to said bushing, which expanded out and thus locked in place.

    I agree that the winding arbor pivot isn't attractive here, but it's tough to grow new brass. The OP did a good job of getting rid of the worst of the solder.

    M Kinsler
     
  10. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    That doesn't sound like a bad way to approach the problem, especially if the owner doesn't want to pay you to make it "disappear". They can also be staked to the plate which is a method used by manufacturers. I almost wish I had not asked the OP for "after" photos now. I think he did a very nice job but it seems as though folks are more focused on, and critical of, what he didn't do on S-1. Perhaps not, just seems that way to me.
     
  11. Billy

    Billy Registered User

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    Just for the record, because of all the discussion, I did opt to leave the strike side alone because even as ugly as it looks, it is a functioning bushing. There was no slop, the pivot had no scoring and the countwheel is involved. I just did not feel it was worth the effort, in this case, to remove the ugly, just to make it pretty.
    The saw tooth bushings on the time train, however, had finally failed and stopped the clock. Those had to be repaired to get it back to a running clock. Which by the way, is still ticking sweetly away.

    And really, How many times have you heard from a customer, "That much? Anything you can do to lower the cost?".
    Yeah, I can use these special saw tooth bushings. They'll last 20 years or so and I can knock a third of the price off. "Do it". And this is how we end up here.:chuckling:

    Billy
     
  12. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    If you're the last one to handle the movement, the repair will be attributed to you. Not good for the reputation ;)
     
  13. R&A

    R&A Registered User

    Oct 21, 2008
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    I don't know about you per say. But I do this full time. My opinion reflects on how a repair will be looked at in the future, as to my reputation. I would rather tell you what I would do. Than to tell you nothing at all. Funny how we don't know what a guy has as far as tool and equipment. Go through a lengthy instruction on set up approach. And then find out that the poor guy doesn't even have a screw driver. So on that note. I have no Idea what the intention is for this fix. All I'm trying to do is my best to help.
     
  14. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    The circumstances were stated and re-stated/clarified by the OP for our benefit. I don't know about you "per say", but not too many people who are in business can afford to fix a cosmetic issue without charging the customer for their time. If the customer doesn't want to pay for a cosmetic repair/restoration, and if the repairer honestly doesn't think it is necessary, who is the professional? There was no functional reason to replace the bushing. The customer was informed about it and a photo was taken to document and show the owner of the clock. What more do you want? I'm starting to understand members who disagree so strongly with the judgmental aspects of this thread. If the clock is yours, do what you want to with it. If you're getting paid, educate your customer and do what they pay you to do. If you want to donate your time for the "greater good" of clocks, knock yourself out. I'm done on this particular posting and possibly with the thread.
     
  15. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    I think I was confused on which movement we were discussing. I was thinking it was the one with the gear parts for bushings. Sorry! :glasses:
     
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