• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Clock with wooden platines?

Jaap

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Mar 6, 2013
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Hi all, just acquired this clock today for a bunch of flowers (white tulips).
It has beech wood platines with brass bushings. Sadly the crank is missing
Can anyone date this clock? :screwball:
Thanks,
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Ticktocktime100

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Nov 11, 2012
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Hi,
You have a Black Forest "shield" clock. If it only cost the price of a bunch of flowers, I would say you got a great deal, especially since the dial is in very nice condition. I'm not the best at dating these clocks but I presume it's from around 1850.
Regards.
 

ballistarius

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A good deal, Jaap!:cool: (Mind the woodworm, though)
If the 'chapter ring' is 'domed', not flat, I'd dare to say that the clock is slightly earlier, maybe from the eighties twenties. It's an eight day clock, which is always an improvement over the run-of-the-mill 30 hours chain BF movements.
Check the back of the dial and the backboard in search of handwritten inscriptions. In case they exist, they tend to be hardly legible, though:cuckoo:

Aitor
 

Jaap

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Hi Ticktocktime100,
thanks for dating, the dial has a few small defects which I can repaint.

jaap
 

Jaap

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Hi Ballistarius, I will pay attention to the woodworm. The chaptering is domed, so it is earlier then 1850. I will inspect the back of the dial and backboard. There is some samp at the backboard, which is very hard to read. I'll see if I can make a picture and expand it.

I will let you know what I found.

Thanks.
 

ballistarius

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Oct 26, 2009
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Jaap,
Thinking about it again, I spoke too hastily about the date of your clock, sorry. In the twenties it was common to have residual arabic numerals around the minute ring marking 15, 30, 45 and 60. Most probably, a somehow later date from 1830 to 1850 would be a more realistic one...
The tip of the minute hand is broken and your clock, like most BF, has lost the wooden side doors.
I own two Frisian clocks, a stoelklok and a staartklok. Both non-functional yet.

Aitor
 

Jaap

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Hi Aitor, I have the wooden side doors. I had not noticed the minute hand broken. To busy with other clocks.
Thanks for your date correction.
Jaap
 

Burkhard Rasch

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Jun 1, 2007
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the clock is an nice example of the latest developement of the BF wooden plates clock, it's a so called "vollmessingne Uhr" (full brass clock) meaning that both wheels and pinions as well as the arbors are made of brass/steel, while the earlier type of a "halbmessingne Uhr" (half brass clock) has arbors made of wood, like bobbins,and the wheels/pinions are attached to them. Dating a BF clock should consider a synopsis of different features such as layout of movement,design of shield,hands etc.,the periods of use weren't sharply separated,one maker used an older design longer than another,and the latest characteristic feature can provide a "date" of manufacture in the sense of "not earlier than...." I´d place this one into the region of 1880+-10,allthough wooden plate full metal clocks were built by some old fashioned BF makers up to the beginning of 1900rds.
Best regards
Burkhard
 
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Jaap

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Mar 6, 2013
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the clock is an nice example of the latest developement of the BF wooden plates clock, it's a so called "vollmessingne Uhr" (full brass clock) meaning that both wheels and pinions as well as the arbors are made of brass/steel, while the earlier type of a "halbmessingne Uhr" (half brass clock) has arbors made of wood, like bobbins,and the wheels/pinions are attached to them. Dating a BF clock should consider a synopsis of different features such as layout of movement,design of shield,hands etc.,the periods of use weren't sharply separated,one maker used an older design longer than another,and the latest characteristic feature can provide a "date" of manufacture in the sense of "not earlier than...." I´d place this one into the region of 1880+-10,allthough wooden plate full metal clocks were built by some old fashioned BF makers up to the beginning of 1900rds.
Best regards
Burkhard
Hi Burkhard after searching the internet with the information stamped on the back of the clock, I think the clock was made by the Lorenz Furtwängler Uhrenfabrik.
It is my first clock with wooden platines. Is it difficult to service? I don't want to do any damage.

Jaap
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ballistarius

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Jaap,
After sleeping nine hours again, my brain works in a better fashion now:whistle:
I cannot understand how I didn't realize before that your movement is not a common one with count wheel strike, but one having ratchet and snail strike, which is much rarer!:rolleyes:
About dates, following B. Schaaf's book, Lorenz Furtwaengler was a clockmaker from 1836 to his death in 1866. I believe that your clock cannot be dated after that. Two years after Lorenz's death, his sons established the firma Lorenz Furtwaenglen Soehne (LFS), but there is no trace of the 'S' in the markings on your clock (BTW, where is the stamped signaturae located?)
About dealing with the movement, there is nothing special about the wooden platines if the woodworm has not debilitaded them too much. There are brass (rolled tiny plates, if I recall well) bushings inside the wood and the wheels are common ones made of brass and iron. Cleaning and oiling is like on any other metallic movement.

Aitor
 

Jaap

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Mar 6, 2013
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Hi Aitor, thanks for your valuable information on the rack and snail system, much
appreciated
. The clock is at this moment working and ticking. Is it common for this clock it is only hammering on the full hour? Btw the stamped mark is on the backside at the top. At the front behind the dial plate there is a sign "L F No 4" I will try to repair the minute hand. I'll have to locate some mild steel. Just read your post about the "Wrecked shelf cuckoo". Great work. It's a work of ART.
Jaap
 
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ballistarius

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Hi Jaap,
Many thanks for your kind words about the cuckoo clock :D
I have never had in my hands a snail and ratchet BF clocks, but it is not a strange feature in rather 'ancient' clocks only striking the full hours. Reading now H. Juetemann's book on BF clocks, he says that snail and ratchet strike appeared on BF clocks around 1850 and that only 5% of BF clocks uses that system.
BF shield clock hands are mostly cast brass, but I wouldn't dare to say that yours are not original.

Aitor
 

Jaap

Registered User
Mar 6, 2013
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Hi Jaap,
Many thanks for your kind words about the cuckoo clock :D
I have never had in my hands a snail and ratchet BF clocks, but it is not a strange feature in rather 'ancient' clocks only striking the full hours. Reading now H. Juetemann's book on BF clocks, he says that snail and ratchet strike appeared on BF clocks around 1850 and that only 5% of BF clocks uses that system.
BF shield clock hands are mostly cast brass, but I wouldn't dare to say that yours are not original.

Aitor
Hi Aitor,
The hands are definitely steel, I've tested it with a magnet. So I'll have to make a new minute hand. Maybe I will make 2 new hands of brass. Looks challenging.
Thanks,
Jaap
 

Burkhard Rasch

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Jun 1, 2007
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afaik there are BF hands availiable from Selva/Germany.Google for them "Selva Uhrenteile" and look in their online cathalogue (no affiliation of cause!) Last time when I looked they had three matching pairs(hour and minute) of different lengths,one should be made to fit!
Best regards
Burkhard
 

Jaap

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Mar 6, 2013
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Hi Burkhard,
I just made this afternoon the missing part of the minute hand. All went very well.
Only thing to do now is to paint the hands gold.
Thanks for looking up the BF hands. Much appreciated.

Jaap 303627.jpg
 

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ballistarius

Registered User
Oct 26, 2009
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Nice job, Jaap!:coolsign:
Is there any trace of the hands being originally blued?

Aitor
 

Jaap

Registered User
Mar 6, 2013
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Hi Aitor, the hands were originally steel and painted with a gold paint. I found traces of the paint when I was cleaning off the rust. I will paint them gold color aigain.

Thanks,
Jaap
 
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