Clock school

R

Reigenhardt

I am currently laid off. I am 30 years old and am sick of wall street. I have a college education, but this junk is just not cutting it anymore. I am really good with mechanical things. I have been working on cars since I was a kid. I currently live in the NYC metro area and want to move to a more rural habitat. I am seriously thinking about learning about becoming a clock repairman. I would like to specialize in cuckoos. I have always loved them since I was a kid. I looked at the Horology college and am seriously contemplating doing this. What would I need to do, in order to become a clock repairman, and what is the best way to go about this. I appreciate your help.
 
R

Reigenhardt

I am currently laid off. I am 30 years old and am sick of wall street. I have a college education, but this junk is just not cutting it anymore. I am really good with mechanical things. I have been working on cars since I was a kid. I currently live in the NYC metro area and want to move to a more rural habitat. I am seriously thinking about learning about becoming a clock repairman. I would like to specialize in cuckoos. I have always loved them since I was a kid. I looked at the Horology college and am seriously contemplating doing this. What would I need to do, in order to become a clock repairman, and what is the best way to go about this. I appreciate your help.
 

Smudgy

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May 20, 2003
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I think mechanical aptitude would be the most important thing to have, and an intrest in the field wouldn't hurt. I expect that you'll make less money working on clocks than you have on Wall Street (although I don't know what you did on Wall Street). A horological school would probably be tha quickest way into the field. I've been teaching myself, mostly from books but also a lot of experimentation and a little question asking, but I'm not planning to attempt making a living at this. Another avenue is to hire on as an apprentice to a working clockmaker if you could find one that is willing and can afford it (even if you go as a volunteer the shop owner would have to worry about costs related to possibly broken materials and a loss of reputation if it didn't work out). You should check the archives, as this and other related topics have come up and been discussed in the past. You might consider getting and old movement and tinkering to find out how interested you actually are in the subject.
 

Andy Dervan

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Oct 23, 2002
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Hello,

NAWCC School of Horology would probably give you a basic knowledge of clockrepair. It is roughly a 9 month program to complete the nccessary classes. You would probably want to work with another clock repair person as a journyman repair person for sometime to buildup experience base.

Cuckcoo clocks are a bit of a pain to work on - alot of levers to reassemble and movements are so poorly made (thin brass) that is easier to scrap the old movement and install new movement.
Most clock repair folks will not even touch a Cuckoo clock.

You might want to talk with some clock repair folks in your local area about working with them and/or get some insight about clock repair business.

Good Luck....

Andy Dervan
Misc Board Moderator
 

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