Clock returns

richjfran123

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Jan 5, 2020
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Hi Forum members.
On the subject of returning repaired clocks to customers. Once a repair is completed I leave the clock running for a couple of hours to make sure it’s good to go. What do others do? Do you complete the repair and run it for longer prior to handing back to the owner?

thanks
Guys
 

Jaap

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Mar 6, 2013
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We let the clock run for several weeks, to be sure there are no hidden problems anymore, and it is gone through several winding cycles.
 

Ed O'Brien

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At least a complete power rundown (two is better) to catch hidden faults. For sensitive torsion clock like the Atmos I like to run it a few weeks.
 

R. Croswell

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Apr 4, 2006
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Generally two weeks if the movement has been disassembled. Sometimes less if a specific problem unrelated to the internals is identified - replacing a hammer leather, reattaching/replacing a broken hand, tightening a gong stand, replacing a glass, replacing a door hinge, or the like. If the original complaint concerned an intermittent problem or time keeping issue, two weeks after the problem is identified and fixed would be my minimum, especially for an out of town customer.

RC
 

tom427cid

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Mar 23, 2009
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Hi all,
A fortnite at least. Sometimes longer when the complaint has been for an intermittent issue.
Hope this helps.
tom
 

kinsler33

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Aug 17, 2014
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And sometimes nothing works. I've got one German clock that keeps coming back, each time with some other ailment. Not much to be done except to fix it, inspect it for possible future maladies, give it the usual blessing, and send it home at no charge.

Mark Kinsler
 
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lpbp

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Depending on the type of clock, one week minimum.
 

NEW65

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Nov 17, 2010
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Depends- I’ve had some buyers who are not prepared to wait more than a few days. I normally like to let the movements run for at least 5 days after I’ve spilt the plates and rebushed etc having said that I’ve done major overalls on the Hermle’s and delivered the clocks 48 hours later with no issues.
 

kinsler33

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I doubt that anyone ever perished for lack of an antique clock. I've given up trying to think of a business that's less essential than mine.

M Kinsler

Sometimes I'll ask if they need a loaner.
 

novicetimekeeper

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Jul 26, 2015
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The people who restore my clocks leave them on test a minimum of two weeks, one usually a couple of months or longer!
 

RJSoftware

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Apr 15, 2005
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it really depends. Some repairs are instant, others require testing.

The problem for me is separating repairs into different bills.

I dont go to buy car tires and expect a broken motor to be repaired. But people say, just get the clock running. They expect everything to function, so I have to make parts list and I should do job orders. But casual agreeing gets me in the bind.
 

shutterbug

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I put them on the test stand and run them until I'm comfortable with how they are running. At least a week, so I can see how they work on the lower end of the power cycle, if they are spring driven.
 

D.th.munroe

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Feb 15, 2018
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I'm with most here and like to at least run it down a couple times or 2 weeks.
Like NEW65, I have people who don't want to wait more than a few days, seems to be much more of them lately as well, most are appalled at a wait list.
Dan
 

novicetimekeeper

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Jul 26, 2015
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I chatted to a watchmaker who said he had the whole of his area tied up and that the clock customers were happy to wait two years.
I mentioned that to my boss at the time and he said, "I won't clog up the shop with them for that long".
One of the restorers I use takes about a year, you have to apply to have a clock restored, he decides if he wants to work on it. He is now on the third one for me.
 

shutterbug

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Before my move I was running 6 months behind. I had to stop taking in work so I could catch up with the back log before I moved. I'm still in the process of restoring a work shop outside of my new house. I have it insulated now, with heat and A/C installed. Got the bench put together again, and am in the process of organizing it. I find that it's too small to accommodate my accumulated clocks as well as my tools, so have to decide what I can keep and what needs to go. Kinda' fun, but I'm anxious to get back to work!
 
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