• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

American Clock Purchased From Pony Express

Michael Goldenberg

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I know this is a topic which was covered in different threads from 2008 - 2015.

In 1974, my parents purchased a "Regulator" clock for me as a college graduation present from the Pony Express, an antique store in Yorktown, N.Y. So, my clock has particular sentimental value. From the threads, apparently this store and its owner had a somewhat colorful history.

The clock has been on my wall in every apartment and home ever since, keeping fairly accurate time. After our last move, I was unpacking the clock from its original box which still has a very nice form fit foam insert and found the instructions which accompanied it. Under maintenance it said to remove the clock movement at least once every two years and oil all pivot points with mineral oil.

Well, we are going on 46+ years and I have neglected to ever undertake this maintenance. Now after that many years I hesitate to mess with a clock which is working so well but at the same time was interested in its provenance . So a quick Google search led me to the threads I mentioned above. Thus, that is how I ended up here today.

I have attached a picture of the clock and the "certificate" hanging on the back. If anyone has more history on these clocks I would be interested. Also, based on your expertise if I truly should oil the pivot points, then I will need some basic instructions on how to remove the movement and what should be oiled.

Thanks for reading.

Cerificate.jpg Clock.jpg
 

bruce linde

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mechanical clocks need servicing every 5-10 years for best results... yours almost certainly needs servicing.

servicing starts with complete disassembly and then moves on to addressing any wear issues, cleaning, reassembly, oiling and testing.

see if there's a reputable clock shop or repair person near you... cover certainly complicates things, but whatever it will cost you is almost certainly going to be more than the clock is worth... except for, as you say, sentimental reasons.

it's a nice enough clock and worth it for that (i think... not my money! :) )

or... you could just let it run until something wears enough to make it stop, and then deal with it.

there is nothing particularly special (or pony express, other than the name) about this clocks... except of course for the personal history.
 

musicguy

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Hi and welcome to the NAWCC Forum.

I don't remember ever being at the Pony Express antique store but I did
grow up not too far from Yorktown but do remember the Triangle movie theater
and some nice Chinese restaurants .


Rob
 

shutterbug

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It looks like a long case school house clock. Not a regulator in the true sense of the word, but a nice looking clock for its age. Those clocks were popular in the schools of old (hence their name), and it might well have graced the walls of a single room country school.
 

Michael Goldenberg

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Thank you for the information. I found a very knowledgeable repair person and had him look it over yesterday. He was amazed regarding the condition of the movement and recommended that we do nothing to it. As he said, yes, it is 43 years over due for a lubrication however since it is working so well, lets not mess with it. Or said another way, let sleeping dogs lie.
 

Ticktocktime100

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Hi,

Lubricating the clock with the appropriate clock oil, which is very inexpensive, would only have a positive affect on the movement. It may be fine now, but leaving the pivots dry will eventually cause wear to the holes they fit into - if this happens, the cost of servicing will outweigh the value of the clock. So on that basis, I would definitely lubricate it - unless I misunderstood and your repair person has already done so.

Regards.
 

musicguy

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As he said, yes, it is 43 years over due for a lubrication however since it is working so well, lets not mess with it. Or said another way, let sleeping dogs lie.
I would get another Clock repair person. Clocks and watches were designed
to be oiled and serviced to function.


Rob
 
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Kevin W.

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Cant really see how just oiling is a good thing. The dirt in the pivot holes will be a good grinding slurry and speed up wear. I would get another opinion.
 
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90 Flhs

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Michael
I have a clock just like yours pictures to follow. Here’s what have been able to find out. Apparently there was a dealer in NY who bought clocks which were reproductions from Japan. He put his pony express label on them as sort of limited production. This advertising as I’m told befitted him greatly. I’m taking the movement apart now because the gear on the time side was stripped. I found a used movement for parts. Just started working on clocks since the Covid scare. Was stuck at home for eight weeks. The people on here are very knowledgeable and I’m sure they will help anyway they can. They helped me get my cuckoo clock going. If it means that much to you I agree the the other posts should be cleaned and oiled. The one in the picture will need bushings which will be a fist for me. I learned so much from these guys. Thanks everyone
4095ABD0-57D9-46A7-83CF-867DACCE1F38.jpeg D65DAA2C-6552-4155-973D-CEDFD2A334A7.jpeg 484AF763-0D02-4F2E-8695-C3100534705C.jpeg
 

lpbp

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There was a very nice article on history of this company in a Bulletin article, they refurbished these Japanese clocks even recased some in new cases, and sold them in shops and by mail order.
 

rgmt79

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I also have one of these clocks which I bought on eBay a few years ago. It was described as a Seth Thomas school clock. In fact someone had glued a paper dial over the original painted dial which I was able to remove and discovered that it was a Seikosha. The trade mark on the movement also confirmed this. Research revealed that these were copies of the ST clocks, but scaled down to 3/4 size to suit the small Japanese homes. When the quartz clock was introduced in Japan they switched from mechanical clocks almost overnight, leaving hundreds of clocks abandoned in warehouses. The founder of Pony Express did a deal and purchased many of these clocks and after some cosmetic changes sold them as genuine American (implied) 100 year old antique clocks. To sell them as "made in Japan" would not have been good marketing in those days. They were well made and whilst Seikosha copied the ST movement, typically for Japan they improved upon it.

Richard
 

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