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Clock novice - first post (Regula-34)

Paul Helmuth

NAWCC Member
Apr 25, 2019
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All clock mechanisms operate at just above the tiping point between run and stop. A delicate balance between power and load.

If you have a weight of 1260gm (or more) then that's adequate power. So, you have excess load somewhere in the strike train.

Look more closely at what is happening just before the train stops. That's where your problem lies.

A video , straight in like your first photos of the old movement, would probably help more than any amount of additional text.

Is what I think, Willie X
Thanks again Willie X!

I took a much closer look at the lifting levers and their relationship to the strike wheel/bearing disc (?).
Thinking primarily about momentum and how far it should be able to rotate before it begins doing work.

It was obvious that the new movement required some adjustments to have as much "free running" as the original. So, I tried to replicate that.

I don't have a dedicated test stand (using dining room table) so it may take me a few days to get that set up again (with everything else going on).

I will be sure to get photos and a short movie with the results.
Are "movies" posted the same way that photos are? Just attach and insert?

Many many thanks!
-Paul
 

Paul Helmuth

NAWCC Member
Apr 25, 2019
87
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How much do the weights weigh? The Regula 34 uses weights in the 1200-1300 gram range. The Regula 34 on my wall has weights of 1280 grams.

If you pull down on the strike weight to get the train started and then release the pressure, does it continue normally using only the force from the weight? A closeup photo of the strike wheel when it is in its normal locked position would be helpful.
Weight Update:

Got a scale to measure in the appropriate range.

The weights (according to my scale) weigh 1220 grams

-Paul
 

Paul Helmuth

NAWCC Member
Apr 25, 2019
87
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UPDATE:

Following advice from Willie X and others - I went back and made lift-lever adjustments to more closely match the original - and thinking in terms of building momentum.

Following this set of adjustments I was about 95% "there" - meaning that the strike cycle was working as expected with only the original weight.
So, I made one more set of adjustments - very lightly going in the same direction and presto! The strike cycle is running 100% over many days of hour and half-hour strikes.

Here is a picture of the completed installation. I'm sure this looks wretched to you guys (I'm aware that I shouldn't have left so many marks on the movement) but I was only concerning myself with function.

IMG_2374.jpg

And here is a link to a YouTube video of the strike cycle. As you will see - it's from the front - and not of the inside - as I don't think there is any trouble-shooting left to do.

Of course, I could be wrong about that. Please let me know if you see anything to be concerned about.

Many thanks to all that assisted! I couldn't have done it without you.

-Paul
 

Schatznut

NAWCC Member
Sep 26, 2020
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It looks great, Paul - way to go!
 
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Keith Doster

Registered User
Mar 31, 2011
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Thank you sir!

Your input was invaluable.

-Paul
As someone said, a cuckoo clock is certainly not the best introductory movement to clock repair. There are those who simply refuse to work on them. I will repair one begrudgingly. So don't let this experience unfairly influence you to avoid clock repair. The American kitchen clocks, or Connecticut clocks are far easier (in my opinion) to troubleshoot and repair than cuckoos. Even wooden works clocks are more of a joy to restore than the birdie ones. I'd just encourage you not to shy away from them because of this particular patient. They are certainly troublesome for most of us.
 
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Paul Helmuth

NAWCC Member
Apr 25, 2019
87
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As someone said, a cuckoo clock is certainly not the best introductory movement to clock repair. There are those who simply refuse to work on them. I will repair one begrudgingly. So don't let this experience unfairly influence you to avoid clock repair. The American kitchen clocks, or Connecticut clocks are far easier (in my opinion) to troubleshoot and repair than cuckoos. Even wooden works clocks are more of a joy to restore than the birdie ones. I'd just encourage you not to shy away from them because of this particular patient. They are certainly troublesome for most of us.
Thanks Keith.

Appreciate the comments.

I'll keep that in mind if another "clock crisis" comes across my radar.

I still have PLENTY to learn with watchmaking - so will remain focused in that area.

I'm sure at some point I'll probably expand my horizons to include clocks. I'll be sure to start with the most simple movements first.

:)
 
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