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Clock movements technical diagrams or repair publications

BigDon

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Nov 30, 2021
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Hi folks,

Newbie here. Retired at 66 and looking for a new hobbie and found horology may be the ticket!!

I have been searching (probably in all the wrong places!) for a source of technical drawings and specifications for clock movements. For a new guy like me those kinds of resources would be of great benefit, not only from a learning perspective, but for the information about sizes, tolerances, etc.

I am happy to be a member here and look forward to learning a LOT from you experienced folks. I already have a couple of bids in on some clocks that are supposed to be non-working or for repairs. I figure even if I can't get them to work, the experience of disassembling, inspecting and reassembling will be beneficial.

Thanks to you all for your help!
-DON-
 

bruce linde

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there was a guy named 'snow' (as i remember) who did exploded diagrams of a bunch of spring and weight driven clock movements. i thought it if i had a copy it would help me with everything i needed to learn. i was able to xerox (shows you how old i am!) some copies and they didn't really help at all... although they were nice to look at. you might see if you can scrounge up a copy from somewhere.

my recommendation to you is to starting reading every thread in 'clock repair'... and use google to dig deeper by adding 'site:mb.nawcc.org' to your search params to use the power of google to search the message board, i.e.,:

repair bent tooth site:mb.nawcc.org

also figure out which folks here seem to know what they're talking about... and find your own path between 'hobbyist' and 'professional'.

and then... watch as you circle back over time and realize that what you thought were ok repairs at the time no longer pass your muster. part of the process is understanding that it takes a while to recognize what you're looking at, and how best to approach dealing with it.

these are the truest words you'll read on the MB: "there is no such thing as too much observation or attention to detail"

have at it, brother.
 
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BigDon

New User
Nov 30, 2021
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there was a guy named 'snow' (as i remember) who did exploded diagrams of a bunch of spring and weight driven clock movements. i thought it if i had a copy it would help me with everything i needed to learn. i was able to xerox (shows you how old i am!) some copies and they didn't really help at all... although they were nice to look at. you might see if you can scrounge up a copy from somewhere.

my recommendation to you is to starting reading every thread in 'clock repair'... and use google to dig deeper by adding 'site:mb.nawcc.org' to your search params to use the power of google to search the message board, i.e.,:

repair bent tooth site:mb.nawcc.org

also figure out which folks here seem to know what they're talking about... and find your own path between 'hobbyist' and 'professional'.

and then... watch as you circle back over time and realize that what you thought were ok repairs at the time no longer pass your muster. part of the process is understanding that it takes a while to recognize what you're looking at, and how best to approach dealing with it.

these are the truest words you'll read on the MB: "there is no such thing as too much observation or attention to detail"

have at it, brother.
Thanks Bruce. Great advice. I have already purchased several books that I believe will be helpful and have been reading until I think I've worn my glasses out!!!!

-DON-
 

bruce linde

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I forgot to suggest making a special point of reading the sticky threads at the top of this forum… That’s where I’ve learned the bulk of what i’ve cobbled together so far…
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Read books, repair clocks. Read books repair clocks. Repeat as necessary ... :)

You will never learn it all, even if you concentrat on just one type of clock!

Willie.X
 

LaBounty

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The book to which Bruce refers is actually two loose-leaf binders titled "Details on American Spring Driven Clocks" and "Details on American Weight Driven Clocks" by Dick Swan, 1977- 1978. The NAWCC Library has copies, I believe, but they are otherwise very difficult to find.

Hermle also has a "Spare Parts Catalog" which shows exploded views of movements. I believe Amazon has a copy.

Hope that helps!
 

shutterbug

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You'll find that clocks all work similarly. Once you've gotten past the first experiences with time only, time and strike and chiming clocks, you'll be able to recognize the parts. Some movements are more complicated than others but they all have many things in common.
 
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