Clock movement identification

cucoclock

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Jul 17, 2005
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Hello,

I would need some help for the identification of this great clock movement.

Can you give me some information about: year, country, company maker, ...?

I think probably this clock movement was made for a regulator clock. The clock movement weight (including wood base), is 3.8 kg. Is a loud mouvement.

The movement has a pin-wheel escapement, and don´t have striking mechanism.

Size: high: 21 cm; brass plates thickness: 3.5 mm

Thank you very much for any help.

Kind regards,
Miguel
www.cucoclock.com

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eskmill

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Aug 24, 2000
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I would guess Miguel that the clock movement was made by a craftsman and not a production made item.

That the wheels are solid and not crossed-out is a clue. Too, the length of the wheel collets are long. Those are characteristics that don't go with a mass produced clock movement.

Also, the porcelain face, a pretty one, has been adapted to fasten to the movement front plate. Again, a technique not used in production systems.

I think the movement was carefully made by a skilled metal worker who had the time and tools to hand-make a nice pin-wheel escampement clock movement. Maybe in France.

It is not uncommon to find these one-off movements which were sometimes made in schools where metal crafts were taught. I note that the rear plate has been "grained" after being polished; a technique taught in metal working schools.

You say that the movement is loud or ticks with a loud sound. I think, then that the escapement may probably be of recoil type driven by a heavy drive weight. Normally, a dead-beat escapement is, because of the precision, not noisy.
 

Scottie-TX

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Apr 6, 2004
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Concurring with all of ECK, I add;
I have here a faux pinwheel clock that performs like a recoil and one of the noisiest I own because of the pins SLAMMING into the pallet faces by design. So very much UNlike that design, a true pinwheel may be among the quietest of tickers because the pin has only a few thousandths drop to accellerate toward the next locking face - a distance that barely can produce a sound.
Watch it perform. Does it behave as a pinwheel with a deadbeat movement?
 

jmclaugh

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Jun 1, 2006
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Interesting movement and as others have said looks a hand made one, though where and when and by whom who knows. Odd that the bottom pillars have what appears to be a stud or nut, one is missing and appears to have been soldered, while the top pillars don't.

Makes no sense to me why anyone would use a pinwheel type escapement and end up with a recoil. :?|
 

cucoclock

Registered User
Jul 17, 2005
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Hello,

Thank you very much for all your answers.

Eckmill, your information are very usefull. When I wrote "loud", I was trying to say "heavy". I´m sorry but my english is not too good.

I´m very curious for knowing clock history. My interest in antiques clocks take me to read clock books and try to find all clock information is possible.

Kind regards,
Miguel
www.cucoclock.com
 

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