Clock installed but out of tune

Duzzy

Registered User
Sep 29, 2018
33
0
6
46
Country
hi

I installed my dads long case clock movement and got it keeping time but because I had to bend the hammers slightly the musical hammers are out of tune, how do I get the sweet spot like I have on the hourly chiming hammers?

Thanks in advance

Regards Darren

A04CE2A3-E9B7-4AC2-947C-FF5FA05BE729.jpeg B975BA26-0F48-4C1E-8378-946511653DF2.jpeg 341611AF-4E9B-4BE1-8F93-261F1EDD90CE.jpeg A107D2B0-F21F-4F6B-813C-6B7E0DA15A71.jpeg
 

bangster

Moderator
NAWCC Member
Jan 1, 2005
19,873
443
83
utah
Country
Region
Bend them so's they hit and bounce, instead of hitting and staying.
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
12,774
987
113
The hammers have nothing to do with the "tune".

If the chime rods are not sounding the right tones, you can take the chime assembly to a piano tuner; they should be able to help you out.

Willie X
 

bruce linde

Technical Admin
NAWCC Member
Nov 13, 2011
7,486
992
113
oakland, ca.
clockhappy.com
Country
Region
The hammers have nothing to do with the "tune".
If the chime rods are not sounding the right tones, you can take the chime assembly to a piano tuner; they should be able to help you out.
Willie X

yes... are you saying that they're flat or sharp musically? the wrong notes? or are you saying that the sound of the hammers hitting is not consistent, or plinky, or clanky, etc.?
 

Duzzy

Registered User
Sep 29, 2018
33
0
6
46
Country
Perhaps I should upload a recording. I bent the hourly chiming hammers and they’re perfect to the ear (not that I’m musical) I bent the musical hammers and they just seem flat.

At rest the hammers should sit about 1/8” or 3.1mm away from the chime rods or bars is that correct?

The hammers should hit the bars flush and dead centre is that correct?

The chime block itself has screws I assume that’s for tuning is that correct?

Can I use a tuner app to tune them if the hammers are right?

Thank you for the help of this forum it has allowed me to mount my first non battery clock, I’m learning so much and whilst putting it in saw the reason behind everyone suggesting buying a used or old mechanism

Regards Duzzy
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
12,774
987
113
The screws have no effect on the "tune" but they do need to be tight in the block and the block should have long machine screws that go all the way through the chime block, spacers, and back board, with a flat washers and nuts. Through bolted is the term.

As already stated, you will need the help of someone who knows how to tune things. These folks usually have a "musical ear" and will know exactly what to do. Although a clock is far from being a musical instrumemt it can be tuned to have a reasonably pleasant sound.

Willie X
 
  • Like
Reactions: Duzzy

bangster

Moderator
NAWCC Member
Jan 1, 2005
19,873
443
83
utah
Country
Region
I think what's heard as "out of tune" is simply bad sound due to bad attack on the chime rods.

Is what I think.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Duzzy

kinsler33

Registered User
Aug 17, 2014
3,486
427
83
73
Lancaster, Ohio, USA
Country
Region
I suspect that the chime rods are in perfectly good condition and haven't changed their pitch at all. Their pitch can be altered by grinding and filing, but that isn't your problem. What is likely happening is that the hammers are resting on the chime rods instead of bouncing off, and/or that at least some of the hammers are bouncing off their rod several times when dropped. So you have to adjust the hammers, using the horological sense of the word "adjust." What you do is bend the things until they sound right.

This is not generally easy, and you can expect to spend an hour or so if you've been blessed by the Chime Spirit, and hours more if you haven't. Note that the part of the chime rod hidden inside the cast-iron block is tapered down to a very small cross-section. This de-couples the rod somewhat, allowing it to vibrate more freely. But it also makes the chime rod rather easy to break off, so don't bend the chime rods around.

One other dandy feature of chime rods is that they have a tendency to bounce around wildly after they're struck and continue to do so when they are struck the next time. This is why the same note may sound different the second and third time it is struck as opposed to the first time. Not much to be done about this except to know about it.

M Kinsler
 
  • Like
Reactions: Duzzy

shutterbug

Moderator
NAWCC Member
Oct 19, 2005
44,295
1,347
113
North Carolina
Country
Region
You can manually lift each hammer and let it fall back and strike the chime bar. Get each one to the place where it sounds good, regardless of where the others have to be for the same effect. After that, if the notes are out of tune (and some clocks I've worked on were horrible!) the best bet is getting a tuned set of rods and replacing the old ones with them.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Duzzy

bruce linde

Technical Admin
NAWCC Member
Nov 13, 2011
7,486
992
113
oakland, ca.
clockhappy.com
Country
Region
yes... but it could be striking flush and too hard, causing the initial attack to immediately get muffled... or too soft, where you don’t get enough tone, or it bounces.

you want to find the right balance of tone and sustain... it’s an experimentation thing
 

Duzzy

Registered User
Sep 29, 2018
33
0
6
46
Country
yes... but it could be striking flush and too hard, causing the initial attack to immediately get muffled... or too soft, where you don’t get enough tone, or it bounces.

you want to find the right balance of tone and sustain... it’s an experimentation thing
Ok thankyou I’ll give it a whirl...
 
Our 2021 National Meeting in Hampton Roads Virginia
Topic related ad experiment
Know Your NAWCC Forums Rules!
RULES & GUIDELINES

Find member

Forum statistics

Threads
160,837
Messages
1,395,472
Members
82,860
Latest member
srhuston
Encyclopedia Pages
1,099
Total wiki contributions
2,778
Last edit
Beat Setting 101 by Tom McIntyre