Clock identification part two

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by Adam D., Aug 10, 2018 at 9:57 AM.

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  1. Adam D.

    Adam D. Registered User

    Aug 6, 2018
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    I originally posted this elsewhere but, as suggested, I am starting a new thread.

    I have one more clock that I would like the collective wisdom of the group to take a look at. This one has been in our family for much longer than I have been alive. It runs great, but I will be taking it apart soon and giving it a very long overdue cleaning and oiling. The movement has no markings on the back and is very straightforward in its design. There may be some on the dial side but I'm not sure as I have never had this one apart. This is also the clock in my profile picture and the one that gave me an interest in the mechanics and artistry of the trade to begin with.

    I'm not sure if this clock is all original or not. I believe it is another one of my grandfather's restorations. He, like many here, would buy old clocks all over the place and repair them. Sometimes that involved taking parts and pieces from one clock (sometimes entire movements) and using them to repair something else. I do believe he tried his best to keep things as original as possible though.

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  2. new2clocks

    new2clocks Registered User
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    #2 new2clocks, Aug 10, 2018 at 10:20 AM
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2018 at 10:26 AM
    Adam,

    The movement looks German to me, but we have experts who can identify unmarked movements, and they should be along.

    One way to determine if the movement is original to the case is to look at the backboard of the case.

    Are there extra holes where the original movement was attached? Are there shadows where the original movement once lived? Please provide pictures of the movement attached to the case and one of the backboard without the movement, all, of course, with the door open.

    The only comment I can make regarding originality, is that the dial does not seem centered perfectly with respect to the case, specifically, the door of the case. However, this could be because of the camera angle or because the door is not latched and is open a bit.

    Regards.
     
  3. Adam D.

    Adam D. Registered User

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    Good call on the dial. I have actually never noticed that it is slightly left of center. That said, however, the case does have some degree of distortion and warpage and I would put little faith in the alignment of the door as it drags heavily on the bottom. Below are the photos requested. Note the circle in the finish around the mount. This could be a clue. There are no open mounting holes I can see. I am critical of the piece of plywood the movement attaches to. It looks too modern, but the shims behind it look to be original.

    20180810_103133.jpg Screenshot_20180810-104118_Gallery.jpg
     
  4. new2clocks

    new2clocks Registered User
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    I suppose one could argue that the plywood was needed to stabilize the backboard due some type of damage to the backboard, but the thickness of the plywood indicates to me that the movement is not original to the case. In other words, the plywood was needed to properly fit the depth of the movement to the case.

    However, others are more learned in this area and may have different opinions.

    Regards.
     
  5. Adam D.

    Adam D. Registered User

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    I suspect you are correct. Hopefully someone here can confirm this and, if this is the case, identify the case and movement separately.
     
  6. new2clocks

    new2clocks Registered User
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    The case maker will be almost impossible to identify. Many clockmakers contracted with third party case makers, which is why they all tend to have the same look during a particular period. It is possible that someone has a catalog from a clockmaker back in the day that shows your case, but that is not definitive in determining the movement maker. Hopefully, someone will identify your unmarked movement.

    The style of case is typical for Vienna style wall clocks. Just about all of the German and Austrian clockmakers used this style of case. The style of case was popular from 1885 to 1910, or so.

    Regards.
     
  7. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    The original movement and mount has been removed and replaced with a one weight movement, on a plywood spacer, probably from a smaller clock. Odds are that the original movement was a two weight movement. You can improve the situation you have by refinishing the backboard and turning some longer mount spacers, or seek out a mount and movement that will hopefully fit the shadows left by the original mount. Quite a bit of time and work involved either way ... Willie X
     

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