Clock ID for a clock I'm thinking of buying

Myrten Eyler

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Oct 4, 2013
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I found this at a dealer yesterday. Antique dealer says that it's an Ansonia from the late 1800s. Looks to be in good shape. I even tested it and it runs (ran for over a half hour and was still running when I left). The hourly chime and 1/2 strike works as it should. Was in a hurry at the time so didn't look at the back (other than cursory). Beveled glass is in good shape all around (no cracks or other issues). What are your thoughts as to ID or age?;

Thanks for viewing this.

IMG_1592 (1).JPG
 

bruce linde

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the rules prohibit discussing active for sale or auction items, but... it's a nice looking high quality clock... what it's worth to you is a personal decision but you can certainly price shop on ebay by looking at comparables.

that said, if you don't know when it was last serviced it needs it... and this one's case also needs a bit of love/cleanup. you should factor in the cost of servicing (maybe $200-300? really depends on location and who might be available) when you're thinking about pulling the trigger.
 

Kevin W.

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Nice looking time and strike clock.
 

Salsagev

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But this is private sale, right? Not a auction? My personal price preference for this is 100-150 in that shape. The cheaper you get it for the more money you will have to fix it.
 

Ticktocktime100

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Hi,

A nice clock. Not an Ansonia, but a good quality French four glass clock circa 1890-1900. It will look excellent when restored. If the condition is good and you really like it, you could pay up to about $300-350 plus servicing if you want to keep and enjoy it. If, however, you intend to buy it with a view to investing it would obviously be better to get it for a lower price.

Regards.
 

Dick C

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There is writing on the dial. If you are able to take a better photo it might help to further identify it.
 

ChimeTime

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The pendulum looks to contain mercury vials. One shake of the dismounted pendulum might be an easy way to assess it's original quality level, which could be a good general indicator of its "worthiness" for restoration spending.
 

JTD

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The pendulum looks to contain mercury vials. One shake of the dismounted pendulum might be an easy way to assess it's original quality level, which could be a good general indicator of its "worthiness" for restoration spending.

I don't quite understand how this would indicate the 'worthiness' of the clock, but perhaps I am missing something.

In any case, the pendulum looks to me as if it has 'faux' mercury columns, but I may be wrong.

JTD
 

bruce linde

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mercury pendulums would cost a little more and indicate a higher quality… or at least more expensive… clock.

In this case though those look like solid bars that have rusted or corroded slightly… easy enough to polish up.
 

ChimeTime

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I don't quite understand how this would indicate the 'worthiness' of the clock....
Sorry, that's not what I said.

It either has, or does not have mercury. One shake of the dismounted pendulum would quickly settle the question. Mercury is used in some of the best temperature compensating pendulums. Lack of mercury doesn't prove much, but presence of mercury would likely indicate a clock of very high precision. Thus, regardless of age or ID, a clock probably worth your money, time and effort.

In other words, it's just a quick test you can do on the spot with no other tools or catalogs.
 
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Rob Martinez

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Check for the obvious: slotted screws, consistency/semetry of all hardware, extra holes, metal/glass filings, mix of older/newer looking parts, odd repairs or marks, etc.... Good Luck!
 

Rob Martinez

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Phillips head screws were invented in the 30s and not in wide spread use until the 50s.... Slotted screws (and matching screws/symmetry) are a good thing.
 
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ChimeTime

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Phillips head screws were invented in the 30s and not in wide spread use until the 50s.... Slotted screws (and matching screws/symmetry) are a good thing.
.....AND home repair DIY types don't have parallel tip screwdrivers. The typical wedge type screwdriver most handymen use will cam out of a precision screw and bugger up the screw head in the process.
 

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