clock found in my grandfathers storage

thdk

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Oct 19, 2020
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Hi all,

I don't know much of clocks myself but I found a nice wall clock in my grandfathers storage (after he passed away a few weeks ago :( )

I just liked the design and thought it would be nice in our house. At home I found out it's a mechanical clock and doesnt work on batteries. So I got intrigued in it and tried to find some info.

So I found this forum :)

Can someone help me identify this (date) and tell me if it's worth something?
I was going to replace the mechanics with cheap china stuff with batteries, but if it's too much of shame for this clock I would prefere someone else to be happy with it.

I found the following engravements / identifications:

Front:

Peter
Made in Germany

Back:

MBL 372

Mechanics:

JBF 989

8505
Germany


Here are some pictures:

IMG_20201019_101354.jpg IMG_20201019_101354.jpg IMG_20201019_101432.jpg IMG_20201019_101915.jpg IMG_20201019_101856.jpg IMG_20201019_101754.jpg IMG_20201019_101737.jpg IMG_20201019_101728.jpg IMG_20201019_101655.jpg
 

JTD

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Sep 27, 2005
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Welcome to the board.

Your clock is German. The logo on the dial is that of Peter-Uhren GmbH., of Niedereschach. The firm was started in 1914 and went out of business in 1996.

The MBL and JBF marks were probably made by repairer men in the past and are of no real significance.

It is rather hard to tell when it was made, as the style was popular for quite a number of years. It is not an old clock but others may have a better idea. The 8505 on the back might be a date code (May 1985) but that is just a guess on my part.

Why do you want to change it to a quartz movement? In my opinion that would be a real shame. The clock has survived for years, so why not keep it as it is? Have you tried winding it up? It is an attractive clock and I agree it would look very good in your home.

As to value, it is not worth much, perhaps € 30-40 if it's in working order.

If it were mine, I would keep it and enjoy it, particularly as you say you do like the appearance.

JTD
 

thdk

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Oct 19, 2020
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Hi, thanks for checking my clock!

I havent tried winding it yet, as i need to find some key to do it. But I'll do. If I don't have to wind it everyday, I might keep it indeed.

8505 is indeed possible to be a date code. Especially because 'germany' is immediately following this code.

Thank you very much for your reply.
 

new2clocks

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I havent tried winding it yet, as i need to find some key to do it. But I'll do. If I don't have to wind it everyday, I might keep it indeed.
Welcome to the forum.

It is most likely an 8 day clock, so you you would need to wind it once a week. but others can advise on this issue.

Keys are inexpensive and can be found at clock supply companies. Others can advise on companies in Belgium that will supply clock keys. A clock repair shop usually has many extra keys and they may be willing to give you one for no cost.

I agree with JTD - it would be a shame to convert your clock to a quartz movement. Should you decide to do so, please ensure that you receive back the original mechanical movement and keep it in a safe place so that it can be reinstalled should the next owner prefer originality.

Regards.
 

jmclaugh

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Jun 1, 2006
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I wouldn't think 8505 is a date code as Germany was 2 separate countries then, East & West. I also agree about a quartz movement.
 

new2clocks

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I wouldn't think 8505 is a date code as Germany was 2 separate countries then, East & West. I also agree about a quartz movement.
The "Made in [Country of Origin]" was a U.S. requirement and during the time that Germany was divided between East and West, either West Germany or Germany was acceptable.

"Made in Germany" indicates the clock was made between 1891 and the current day.

"Made in West Germany" indicates the clock was made between 1949 and 1990.

Regards.
 

JTD

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thdk

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Oct 19, 2020
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Aah, good point!
I also realise that saying it is from the 1930s when selling stuff doesn't mean it is from the 1930s ;)

I was just looking for clocks with similar characteristics, like
  • the font of the numbers
  • the design of the 'clock arms'
  • front cover
  • back cover
  • Peter logo
So far little similar clocks.
 

new2clocks

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Aah, good point!
I also realise that saying it is from the 1930s when selling stuff doesn't mean it is from the 1930s ;)

I was just looking for clocks with similar characteristics, like
  • the font of the numbers
  • the design of the 'clock arms'
  • front cover
  • back cover
  • Peter logo
So far little similar clocks.
If you type Peter-Uhren in the search function (the little magnifying glass in the upper right corner) you will receive quite a few hits from these forums.

Regards.
 

jmclaugh

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The "Made in [Country of Origin]" was a U.S. requirement and during the time that Germany was divided between East and West, either West Germany or Germany was acceptable.

"Made in Germany" indicates the clock was made between 1891 and the current day.

"Made in West Germany" indicates the clock was made between 1949 and 1990.

Regards.
I'd imagined as they were 2 separate countries no to mention the wall it might have been of interest when asking the country of origin but don't you just love bureaucrats.
 

new2clocks

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I'd imagined as they were 2 separate countries no to mention the wall it might have been of interest when asking the country of origin but don't you just love bureaucrats.
I researched the following some time ago, so I am relying on memory and the following is subject to correction.

After WW II, Germany was divided into 4 zones of occupation - the U.S. zone, the British zone, the French zone and the Soviet zone. The German government moved its capital from Berlin to Bonn and the new name of Germany was (in English) the Federal Republic of Germany ("FRG"). The U.S. and the German government in Bonn considered ALL of Germany, including the Soviet zone, as the FRG. The eastern part of Germany was looked upon as the "Soviet occupied / influenced Germany".

In the meantime, the Soviet occupied / influenced part of Germany declared itself the Democratic Republic of Germany ("DRG") and considered itself a country independent from the rest of Germany.

Long story short (this is where my recollection becomes fuzzy and is subject to correction) - I believe that the U.S. and the Bonn government never technically recognized the DRG (or what was conveniently referred to as East Germany). So in effect, from a U.S. and FRG perspective, East and West Germany never technically existed. It was Germany - whose eastern part was Soviet occupied or Soviet influenced. As a result, from a technical perspective, the term Germany was actually more accurate.

However, East and West Germany quickly became part of the vernacular and from a U.S. import perspective, either term - Germany or West Germany or other variations - was acceptable.

After having said all of the above, I usually just take a short cut and state that the term "Germany" or "West Germany or variants of West Germany" were acceptable under the U.S. import laws.:)

Regards.
 

jmclaugh

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Oh I can believe all that, which is why I said bureaucrats and I include politicians in that term. Not to mention the wall.
 
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